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Stupid question but...

Posted by on Sep. 15, 2011 at 9:05 PM
  • 4 Replies

What exactly is an IEP? and what does it have to do with poor articulation?

by on Sep. 15, 2011 at 9:05 PM
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goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 15, 2011 at 9:09 PM

 

In the United States an Individualized Education Program, commonly referred to as an IEP, is mandated by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In Canada and the United Kingdom, an equivalent document is called an Individual Education Plan.

An IEP is designed to meet the unique educational needs of one child, who may have a disability, as defined by federal regulations. The IEP is intended to help children reach educational goals more easily than they otherwise would. 34 CFR 300.320 In all cases the IEP must be tailored to the individual student's needs as identified by the IEP evaluation process, and must especially help teachers and related service providers (such as paraprofessional educators) understand the student's disability and how the disability affects the learning process.

The IEP should describe how the student learns, how the student best demonstrates that learning and what teachers and service providers will do to help the student learn more effectively. Key considerations in developing an IEP include assessing students in all areas related to the known disabilities, simultaneously considering ability to access the general curriculum, considering how the disability affects the student’s learning, developing goals and objectives that correspond to the needs of the student, and ultimately choosing a placement in the least restrictive environment possible for the student.

As long as a student qualifies for special education, the IEP must be regularly maintained and updated over the student's primary educational years (i.e. up to the point of high school graduation, or prior to the 22nd birthday). If a student in special education attends university upon graduation, the university's own system and procedures take over. Placements often occur in "general education", mainstream classes, and specialised classes or sub-specialties taught by a specifically trained individual, such as a special education teacher, sometimes within a resource room.

An IEP is meant to ensure that students receive an appropriate placement, not "only" special education classrooms or special schools. It is meant to give the student a chance to participate in "normal" school culture and academics as much as is possible for that individual student. In this way, the student is able to have specialized assistance only when such assistance is absolutely necessary, and otherwise maintains the freedom to interact with and participate in the activities of his or her more general school peers.

goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 15, 2011 at 9:10 PM

Yeah my dd kinda went through that with poor articulation. She got occupational therapy for it. Still does if needed.

mrsnoble2004
by on Sep. 15, 2011 at 9:16 PM

8 year old dd had hearing problems until she was 6, finally got tubes and it cleared up. Had about a year of speech outside of school but has still been struggling with her reading. I asked for help and instead of working on her reading they want to work on her speech. Idk. I'm hoping if they clear up the speech it will rollover into an improvement in reading skills.

goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 15, 2011 at 9:18 PM

Oh they are doing an IEP for speech. That's what my dd has (amongst other things) but yeah. Go for it. It should help. They might put her in a reading program later.

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