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Homemade Laundry Detergent

Posted by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 11:27 AM
  • 23 Replies

Not sure if anyone in this group is into that sort of thing but I've been making my own laundry soap for awhile now and just Love it. Here's a link to check out: http://tipnut.com/10-homemade-laundry-soap-detergent-recipes/

I do a slightly modified version of recipe 5. I can make between 2 1/2 -3 gallons for about $1 and it takes me less time to make it than it would to drive to the store to buy it.



by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 11:27 AM
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Replies (1-10):
jltplk25
by Gold Member on Sep. 22, 2011 at 11:51 AM
Cool! Is it safe for sensitive skin?
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LindaClement
by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 11:58 AM

Interesting...

Just a pedantic correction, though: none of these are detergents. Soap is distinct from detergent, it has different properties, starting with the presence of soap (a mixture of lye that is neutralized with fats).

Detergents became popular because they're better surfactants (the property of being able to lift oil from surfaces) than soap, especially in hard water, they hold more dirt in suspension in the wash water (to stop it re-soiling the clothes, or being distributed evenly onto all of them rather than washed away), and rinse more cleanly (soap leaves a residue) so fabrics stay cleaner for longer (without needing to be starched, which was not added to clothes to make them stiff, but to make them more dirt-resistant)...

Some of the problems with soaps can be solved by adding sodas, but not all. A lot of people find soap residue extremely irritating to their skin.

The other huge difference is volume: for the same cleaning power, you can use a fraction of detergent compared to soap, although detergent manufacturers are inclined to suggest a much higher use than is necessary. I use 1/8c of regular powdered detergent per extra-capacity load.

hc_ac_jc_nc
by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 12:04 PM
what is washing soda? i wanna make some but never heard of washing soda lol...
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goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 22, 2011 at 12:07 PM

The stuff I make is.

Quoting jltplk25:

Cool! Is it safe for sensitive skin?


goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 22, 2011 at 12:11 PM

It's an Arm & Hammer product. I found it at Walmart and all the grocery stores in town. It's a couple bucks for a big box.

Quoting hc_ac_jc_nc:

what is washing soda? i wanna make some but never heard of washing soda lol...


goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 22, 2011 at 12:18 PM

good points.. The stuff I make doesn't irritate our skin at all. and technically none of our clothes actually get like soil or "dirt" on them: I'm a SAHM, I have a dd and my dh is a white collar worker so I don't really have stains and such to deal with so what I make works for us.

Quoting LindaClement:

Interesting...

Just a pedantic correction, though: none of these are detergents. Soap is distinct from detergent, it has different properties, starting with the presence of soap (a mixture of lye that is neutralized with fats).

Detergents became popular because they're better surfactants (the property of being able to lift oil from surfaces) than soap, especially in hard water, they hold more dirt in suspension in the wash water (to stop it re-soiling the clothes, or being distributed evenly onto all of them rather than washed away), and rinse more cleanly (soap leaves a residue) so fabrics stay cleaner for longer (without needing to be starched, which was not added to clothes to make them stiff, but to make them more dirt-resistant)...

Some of the problems with soaps can be solved by adding sodas, but not all. A lot of people find soap residue extremely irritating to their skin.

The other huge difference is volume: for the same cleaning power, you can use a fraction of detergent compared to soap, although detergent manufacturers are inclined to suggest a much higher use than is necessary. I use 1/8c of regular powdered detergent per extra-capacity load.


LindaClement
by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 12:54 PM

I don't have skin sensitive to soap... I don't use it, but it doesn't bother me.

My sister lives in an area of extremely hard water, even with a water softener her clothes go grey unless she uses about 3x as much detergent as the boxes suggest. 

Two other points about laundry products: 

1. Most people are washing off nothing more than skin oil and dust from most of their clothes, and for that just the agitation and the water are more important than if there is any product added to the water. 

To get our clothes clean here (super-soft water land) I don't have to be careful of how much I pack into the washer, or how much product I use. My sister uses the largest load for half the clothes I can wash at a time, and they still don't come as clean.

2. Mild detergents can be used on many 'dry-clean only' garments, while soaps are not a good idea. 

I don't want to suggest that making your own laundry product is bad or wrong... just that there are some considerations involved.

I hang my clothes out to dry every possible time I can, and have some bleached and faded clothes as a result... just 'cause there's a downside doesn't mean I think I should stop doing it!

Quoting goddess99:

good points.. The stuff I make doesn't irritate our skin at all. and technically none of our clothes actually get like soil or "dirt" on them: I'm a SAHM, I have a dd and my dh is a white collar worker so I don't really have stains and such to deal with so what I make works for us.

Quoting LindaClement:

Interesting...

Just a pedantic correction, though: none of these are detergents. Soap is distinct from detergent, it has different properties, starting with the presence of soap (a mixture of lye that is neutralized with fats).

Detergents became popular because they're better surfactants (the property of being able to lift oil from surfaces) than soap, especially in hard water, they hold more dirt in suspension in the wash water (to stop it re-soiling the clothes, or being distributed evenly onto all of them rather than washed away), and rinse more cleanly (soap leaves a residue) so fabrics stay cleaner for longer (without needing to be starched, which was not added to clothes to make them stiff, but to make them more dirt-resistant)...

Some of the problems with soaps can be solved by adding sodas, but not all. A lot of people find soap residue extremely irritating to their skin.

The other huge difference is volume: for the same cleaning power, you can use a fraction of detergent compared to soap, although detergent manufacturers are inclined to suggest a much higher use than is necessary. I use 1/8c of regular powdered detergent per extra-capacity load.



monkeymamma72
by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 1:31 PM

Definitely gonna have to check into this.  I have a friend that makes all her cleaning supplies herself.  Gonna have to ask her for her recipes in addition to these.  Thanks for sharing!

Meltopia529
by on Sep. 22, 2011 at 3:16 PM

 I've been looking into making my own as well! The recipe I found was slightly different, but pretty much the same. I just need to finish up using a few bottles that I got while they were on sale. Then I will try this!

goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 22, 2011 at 3:24 PM

good and save those containers, so when you make your own, you'll have smaller easier containers to put your soap in. It helps. Once you make it, you'll see what I mean :)

Quoting Meltopia529:

 I've been looking into making my own as well! The recipe I found was slightly different, but pretty much the same. I just need to finish up using a few bottles that I got while they were on sale. Then I will try this!


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