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Don't tell me how to feed MY baby!!!!!!!

So, I've heard all this bad stuff about baby cereal and oatmeal. I even made a post in group asking a question but no one answered my question because they were so intent upon tell me how bad feeding my baby oatmeal was and that I should do "baby led solids" and completly skip baby food all together. I did research it and decided that "bab led solids" just wasn't for me...especially seeing as how we get FREE baby food through my WIC. Why let all that food go to waste? I understand that people have opinions but someone could have at least answered my question before telling me what to feed MY baby. >.>

CafeMom Tickers
by on Jan. 14, 2013 at 12:07 AM
Replies (281-290):
melindabelcher
by Bronze Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 1:02 PM
Actually there is more risk of baby choking on purees since the care taker is controling the spoon(and extremely higher chance.of choking on cereal in a bottle), how far it goes, often over riding their natural gag reflex. It's extremely rare to choke on solids when it's baby led. Id encourage you to look into it, not to necessarily do it but at least learn something new


Quoting angelmj:

Isn't baby-led weaning hazardous sometimes anyways? Choking? 


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
SuDoNim
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 1:03 PM

I agree delaying cord clamping can be beneficial, but as far as I've read, the higher iron levels after delayed clamping only last until 6 months of age; after that the difference is negligable and benefits are theoretical. Again, not all breastfed babies will be deficient without some form of iron supplementation, but the only way to know is to have their levels checked.

As far as the iron used in baby cereal, it is not synthetic; electrolyic iron is simply elemental iron in powdered form. Cereal is not the only way to supplement iron, but is often the easiest and most realistic mode for an infant.      

Quoting SlapItHigh:

This actually isn't true.  Cereal contains no iron, they have to add snythetic iron.  The synthetic iron is poorly absorbed in infant cereals.  The natural iron in breastmilk is much more absorbed even when less is present.  Also, the only reason a baby's iron needs may increase at 6 months is because of the non-evidence based practice of immediate cord clamping.  It's harmful to babies and robs them of their iron stores.  This is an imporant issue that pregnant mothers should take note of.  If they allow their baby's cord to continue to pulsate before clamping, their baby will get their full blood supply and thus, their full iron supply.  

I know, I know....immediate cord clamping is another thing that many want to do blindly b/c their dr said so and "women on the internet are telling me what to do".  Or, they could realize that other mothers want to help by spreading important empowering information.  Ladies, we can become informed too!

Stop allowing the hospital staff to clamp babies cords right away and then let them eat what is healthy for them -- real food not synthetics!

Quoting SuDoNim:

Cereals are a good source of iron, which is really important afer 6 months of age because that's when a baby's iron needs increase. Breastmilk doesn't always provide enough iron (even if mom's iron levels are fine), so it's important to have your baby's iron levels checked if s/he is not eating cereals. All of my babies refused cereals and were exclusively breastfed; my older two never had iron issues, but my youngest was anemic by 8 months. Baby-led solids is a great in theory, but not always in practice; some babies (like my youngest) refuse solids well into the second year, which can cause health and developmental issues if you don't keep an eye on iron and vitamin levels.



gumeshoe
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 1:05 PM

She might as well posted I need an appropriate forward facing car seat for a 7 month old in the car seat group. Since it is legal in many states just not recommended, now why isn't people telling me what the best car seat is for my child? Why are they just telling me I shouldn't? So what there are several posts in that group against forward facing children too early.

The only place she has been bashed is in this post. And it is really funny so many here are willing to believe what she said at face value without checking the other post. It is really easy to find. WIC was never the issue. Bashing has never been the issue. She didn't give the details to answer her about pumping so they answered the big read flag they saw.

Ladies in that group helped me answer my pumping questions. But I gave massive details. What pump I had, when I pumped, what the result was, the issue I needed help with all the background. Too bad she didn't provide the same details.

Quoting piwife:

Exactly, I don't agree with certain stuff, do I go to other groups and complain like a little girl.. nope am a grown as woman. With 3 kids I know what's best for my kids. I do love to learn... and am thankful for the ladies in that other group.
Mel0dy
by Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 1:15 PM

 I don't tell people how to feed there kids, if people want to know how "I" feed my DD I would be glad to tell them but other then that I would not tell someone how or what to feed there kids. so anyway heres how I feed/feed my DD. She was breastfeed till 11 and a half months, I started her on cereal o 6 months but it way to much for her and she started shitting out blood. so we stopped and just feed her baby food (from jar and homemade) we tried cereal again  at about 8 months, she didnt shit out blood but it bugged her tummy. Now shes 14 months (not breastfed anymore) she eats whatever we eat and LOVES food lol. she can be picky at times but alot of kids her age are lol Read up on baby/toddler nutrition and diffrent foods and stuff and do what YOU feel is right. 

SlapItHigh
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 1:52 PM

Even with immediate cord clamping across the board, exclusively breastfed baby's iron stores last until 6 months.  The exception to that is babies born to diabetic mothers and low birth weight babies.  Additionally, we know that delayed cord clamping for 3 minutes (I do longer) "significantly increases serum ferritin levels in infants at 6 months of age".

The iron used in baby cereal is electrolytic iron.  I considered a couple different words before settling on synthetic and I think it was apt.  Unfortunately, I've had to study iron fortification extensively as I have Hemochromatosis and my children are risk as well.

Quoting SuDoNim:

I agree delaying cord clamping can be beneficial, but as far as I've read, the higher iron levels after delayed clamping only last until 6 months of age; after that the difference is negligable and benefits are theoretical. Again, not all breastfed babies will be deficient without some form of iron supplementation, but the only way to know is to have their levels checked.

As far as the iron used in baby cereal, it is not synthetic; electrolyic iron is simply elemental iron in powdered form. Cereal is not the only way to supplement iron, but is often the easiest and most realistic mode for an infant.      

Quoting SlapItHigh:

This actually isn't true.  Cereal contains no iron, they have to add snythetic iron.  The synthetic iron is poorly absorbed in infant cereals.  The natural iron in breastmilk is much more absorbed even when less is present.  Also, the only reason a baby's iron needs may increase at 6 months is because of the non-evidence based practice of immediate cord clamping.  It's harmful to babies and robs them of their iron stores.  This is an imporant issue that pregnant mothers should take note of.  If they allow their baby's cord to continue to pulsate before clamping, their baby will get their full blood supply and thus, their full iron supply.  

I know, I know....immediate cord clamping is another thing that many want to do blindly b/c their dr said so and "women on the internet are telling me what to do".  Or, they could realize that other mothers want to help by spreading important empowering information.  Ladies, we can become informed too!

Stop allowing the hospital staff to clamp babies cords right away and then let them eat what is healthy for them -- real food not synthetics!

Quoting SuDoNim:

Cereals are a good source of iron, which is really important afer 6 months of age because that's when a baby's iron needs increase. Breastmilk doesn't always provide enough iron (even if mom's iron levels are fine), so it's important to have your baby's iron levels checked if s/he is not eating cereals. All of my babies refused cereals and were exclusively breastfed; my older two never had iron issues, but my youngest was anemic by 8 months. Baby-led solids is a great in theory, but not always in practice; some babies (like my youngest) refuse solids well into the second year, which can cause health and developmental issues if you don't keep an eye on iron and vitamin levels.




SuDoNim
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:17 PM

...which is pretty much what I said:

1. Iron stores are sufficient until about 6 months

2. Benefit of higher iron levels after delayed cord cutting until about 6 months

3. Electrocytic iron is not synthetic

Quoting SlapItHigh:

Even with immediate cord clamping across the board, exclusively breastfed baby's iron stores last until 6 months.  The exception to that is babies born to diabetic mothers and low birth weight babies.  Additionally, we know that delayed cord clamping for 3 minutes (I do longer) "significantly increases serum ferritin levels in infants at 6 months of age".

The iron used in baby cereal is electrolytic iron.  I considered a couple different words before settling on synthetic and I think it was apt.  Unfortunately, I've had to study iron fortification extensively as I have Hemochromatosis and my children are risk as well.

Quoting SuDoNim:

I agree delaying cord clamping can be beneficial, but as far as I've read, the higher iron levels after delayed clamping only last until 6 months of age; after that the difference is negligable and benefits are theoretical. Again, not all breastfed babies will be deficient without some form of iron supplementation, but the only way to know is to have their levels checked.

As far as the iron used in baby cereal, it is not synthetic; electrolyic iron is simply elemental iron in powdered form. Cereal is not the only way to supplement iron, but is often the easiest and most realistic mode for an infant.      

Quoting SlapItHigh:

This actually isn't true.  Cereal contains no iron, they have to add snythetic iron.  The synthetic iron is poorly absorbed in infant cereals.  The natural iron in breastmilk is much more absorbed even when less is present.  Also, the only reason a baby's iron needs may increase at 6 months is because of the non-evidence based practice of immediate cord clamping.  It's harmful to babies and robs them of their iron stores.  This is an imporant issue that pregnant mothers should take note of.  If they allow their baby's cord to continue to pulsate before clamping, their baby will get their full blood supply and thus, their full iron supply.  

I know, I know....immediate cord clamping is another thing that many want to do blindly b/c their dr said so and "women on the internet are telling me what to do".  Or, they could realize that other mothers want to help by spreading important empowering information.  Ladies, we can become informed too!

Stop allowing the hospital staff to clamp babies cords right away and then let them eat what is healthy for them -- real food not synthetics!

Quoting SuDoNim:

Cereals are a good source of iron, which is really important afer 6 months of age because that's when a baby's iron needs increase. Breastmilk doesn't always provide enough iron (even if mom's iron levels are fine), so it's important to have your baby's iron levels checked if s/he is not eating cereals. All of my babies refused cereals and were exclusively breastfed; my older two never had iron issues, but my youngest was anemic by 8 months. Baby-led solids is a great in theory, but not always in practice; some babies (like my youngest) refuse solids well into the second year, which can cause health and developmental issues if you don't keep an eye on iron and vitamin levels.





SlapItHigh
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:33 PM

No, you didn't say #1.  As for #2, you claim that they last until 6 months which implies at 6 months they are the same.  At 6 months, they are significantly higher and that doesn't imply how much longer they last.  Are you claiming they just magically disappear the day after 6 months?  Why did you quote my post in the first place to comment on my cord clamping statements?  To agree with me?  You clearly were implying that there's not much difference by 6 months which is not accurate.  The research beyond 6 months simply hasn't been done.  However we know that at 6 months it is much higher.  With immediate cord clamping, babies iron stores last until 6 months and then additional iron intake is warranted.  With delayed cord clamping such is not the case as their iron stores are much higher at 6 months. 

We will have to agree to disagree regarding electrolytic iron.  The process is not as simple as you describe as you are completely ignoring the "electro" part of the process.  The process of electrodeposition is not simply grinding down elemental iron into powder.  My first thought was artificial but then I dismissed that since it does come from natural forms, however the process and the end result is not what would be naturally found in food.  Therefore, it fits the definition:

"devised, arranged, or fabricated for special situations to imitate or replace usual realities"

Quoting SuDoNim:

...which is pretty much what I said:

1. Iron stores are sufficient until about 6 months

2. Benefit of higher iron levels after delayed cord cutting until about 6 months

3. Electrocytic iron is not synthetic

Quoting SlapItHigh:

Even with immediate cord clamping across the board, exclusively breastfed baby's iron stores last until 6 months.  The exception to that is babies born to diabetic mothers and low birth weight babies.  Additionally, we know that delayed cord clamping for 3 minutes (I do longer) "significantly increases serum ferritin levels in infants at 6 months of age".

The iron used in baby cereal is electrolytic iron.  I considered a couple different words before settling on synthetic and I think it was apt.  Unfortunately, I've had to study iron fortification extensively as I have Hemochromatosis and my children are risk as well.

Quoting SuDoNim:

I agree delaying cord clamping can be beneficial, but as far as I've read, the higher iron levels after delayed clamping only last until 6 months of age; after that the difference is negligable and benefits are theoretical. Again, not all breastfed babies will be deficient without some form of iron supplementation, but the only way to know is to have their levels checked.

As far as the iron used in baby cereal, it is not synthetic; electrolyic iron is simply elemental iron in powdered form. Cereal is not the only way to supplement iron, but is often the easiest and most realistic mode for an infant.      

Quoting SlapItHigh:

This actually isn't true.  Cereal contains no iron, they have to add snythetic iron.  The synthetic iron is poorly absorbed in infant cereals.  The natural iron in breastmilk is much more absorbed even when less is present.  Also, the only reason a baby's iron needs may increase at 6 months is because of the non-evidence based practice of immediate cord clamping.  It's harmful to babies and robs them of their iron stores.  This is an imporant issue that pregnant mothers should take note of.  If they allow their baby's cord to continue to pulsate before clamping, their baby will get their full blood supply and thus, their full iron supply.  

I know, I know....immediate cord clamping is another thing that many want to do blindly b/c their dr said so and "women on the internet are telling me what to do".  Or, they could realize that other mothers want to help by spreading important empowering information.  Ladies, we can become informed too!

Stop allowing the hospital staff to clamp babies cords right away and then let them eat what is healthy for them -- real food not synthetics!

Quoting SuDoNim:

Cereals are a good source of iron, which is really important afer 6 months of age because that's when a baby's iron needs increase. Breastmilk doesn't always provide enough iron (even if mom's iron levels are fine), so it's important to have your baby's iron levels checked if s/he is not eating cereals. All of my babies refused cereals and were exclusively breastfed; my older two never had iron issues, but my youngest was anemic by 8 months. Baby-led solids is a great in theory, but not always in practice; some babies (like my youngest) refuse solids well into the second year, which can cause health and developmental issues if you don't keep an eye on iron and vitamin levels.






SuDoNim
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:28 PM

1. Yes, I did (see red text)

2. I implied no such thing. Again, I AGREE that there is a benefit of higher iron levels with delayed cord cutting, but the fact is there is no evidence that the benefits extend past 6 months.

To be honest, I'm not sure why you quoted me in the first place. The OP asked why some claim that cereals are useless or downright "dangerous". We're talking about adding cereal at 6 months, what do iron stores before 6 months have to do with the biological need for more iron after 6 months? Not all breastfed babies will be deficient, but it's dangerous and foolish to assume so without actually having those iron levels checked in the first place. 

Quoting SlapItHigh:

No, you didn't say #1.  As for #2, you claim that they last until 6 months which implies at 6 months they are the same.  At 6 months, they are significantly higher and that doesn't imply how much longer they last.  Are you claiming they just magically disappear the day after 6 months?  Why did you quote my post in the first place to comment on my cord clamping statements?  To agree with me?  You clearly were implying that there's not much difference by 6 months which is not accurate.  The research beyond 6 months simply hasn't been done.  However we know that at 6 months it is much higher.  With immediate cord clamping, babies iron stores last until 6 months and then additional iron intake is warranted.  With delayed cord clamping such is not the case as their iron stores are much higher at 6 months. 

We will have to agree to disagree regarding electrolytic iron.  The process is not as simple as you describe as you are completely ignoring the "electro" part of the process.  The process of electrodeposition is not simply grinding down elemental iron into powder.  My first thought was artificial but then I dismissed that since it does come from natural forms, however the process and the end result is not what would be naturally found in food.  Therefore, it fits the definition:

"devised, arranged, or fabricated for special situations to imitate or replace usual realities"

Quoting SuDoNim:

...which is pretty much what I said:

1. Iron stores are sufficient until about 6 months

2. Benefit of higher iron levels after delayed cord cutting until about 6 months

3. Electrocytic iron is not synthetic

Quoting SlapItHigh:

Even with immediate cord clamping across the board, exclusively breastfed baby's iron stores last until 6 months.  The exception to that is babies born to diabetic mothers and low birth weight babies.  Additionally, we know that delayed cord clamping for 3 minutes (I do longer) "significantly increases serum ferritin levels in infants at 6 months of age".

The iron used in baby cereal is electrolytic iron.  I considered a couple different words before settling on synthetic and I think it was apt.  Unfortunately, I've had to study iron fortification extensively as I have Hemochromatosis and my children are risk as well.

Quoting SuDoNim:

I agree delaying cord clamping can be beneficial, but as far as I've read, the higher iron levels after delayed clamping only last until 6 months of age; after that the difference is negligable and benefits are theoretical. Again, not all breastfed babies will be deficient without some form of iron supplementation, but the only way to know is to have their levels checked.

As far as the iron used in baby cereal, it is not synthetic; electrolyic iron is simply elemental iron in powdered form. Cereal is not the only way to supplement iron, but is often the easiest and most realistic mode for an infant.      

Quoting SlapItHigh:

This actually isn't true.  Cereal contains no iron, they have to add snythetic iron.  The synthetic iron is poorly absorbed in infant cereals.  The natural iron in breastmilk is much more absorbed even when less is present.  Also, the only reason a baby's iron needs may increase at 6 months is because of the non-evidence based practice of immediate cord clamping.  It's harmful to babies and robs them of their iron stores.  This is an imporant issue that pregnant mothers should take note of.  If they allow their baby's cord to continue to pulsate before clamping, their baby will get their full blood supply and thus, their full iron supply.  

I know, I know....immediate cord clamping is another thing that many want to do blindly b/c their dr said so and "women on the internet are telling me what to do".  Or, they could realize that other mothers want to help by spreading important empowering information.  Ladies, we can become informed too!

Stop allowing the hospital staff to clamp babies cords right away and then let them eat what is healthy for them -- real food not synthetics!

Quoting SuDoNim:

Cereals are a good source of iron, which is really important afer 6 months of age because that's when a baby's iron needs increase. Breastmilk doesn't always provide enough iron (even if mom's iron levels are fine), so it's important to have your baby's iron levels checked if s/he is not eating cereals. All of my babies refused cereals and were exclusively breastfed; my older two never had iron issues, but my youngest was anemic by 8 months. Baby-led solids is a great in theory, but not always in practice; some babies (like my youngest) refuse solids well into the second year, which can cause health and developmental issues if you don't keep an eye on iron and vitamin levels.







Sharkgirl7
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:31 PM
1 mom liked this

It's only free to you. It's costly to the WIC office. If you don't buy it with their 'free' checks, then it'll be free to them. 

And cereal has absolutely zero nutrition value.

Sharkgirl7
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:36 PM
4 moms liked this

OMG, I just found your other post. Get off your pedastal about WIC and being free. Post what you posted in the other group. The actual truth. Thanks.

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