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Age and Grades *Another Question

Posted by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:03 PM
  • 18 Replies

So I was studying to be a teacher (and was told to run not walk away from that career path by every teacher I observed.) I noticed in middle schools that there are a lot of kids who have been held back. There was a 17 year old in a 6th grade geography class that I observed. Unless it was an AP or Honors High school class there was always at least one kid who was a minim of 3 to 4 years older than the other students. The boy (man?) in the geography class stood out to me in particular because he was very flirty with some of the girls (some who were 12 and some who were a little bit old 13 or 14 but not 17.) On one hand I feel bad for these kids because they are being grouped in with 12 year olds and are told that these kids are their peers. It's not like you can forbid him from talking to the other students right? But on the other hand, I would not want my 12 year old daughter flirting with or even hanging out with a 17 year old. 

So I guess what I'm asking is: Is it right, if we base when kids enter school on age, to allow older students to be held back more than a few times? I realize there isn't a practical obvious solution but the situation doesn't seem desireable or in anyone's best interest. 

*** If a boy in this situation does end up becoming intamate with a girl and being prosecuted is the school system in some way responcible for setting him up? 

by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:03 PM
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Replies (1-10):
splatz
by Sarah on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:14 PM

It seems odd to me that a 17 year old would be in a middle school classroom. I graduated at 17... 

Maevelyn
by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:20 PM

he wanted to finish and he had been held back multiple times. Where we live you can attend school until your 21 as long as you're enrolled continuously (meaning if he dropped out he couldn't come back) and have a graduation track. They had to fast track him so he would have been able to skip some classes all together (like PE and electives.) I think he was doing half a day at the middle/ junior high and half a day at the high school next door. He had 4 years to finish middle school, junior high and high school. He didn't have any disabilities but was "moved around a lot." Kids that old in middle school class rooms are rare compared to 8th or 9th grade but they aren't unheard of. My county is seriously weird the do not drop kids out. 

Quoting splatz:

It seems odd to me that a 17 year old would be in a middle school classroom. I graduated at 17... 


Kris_PBG
by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:22 PM
What you are reporting is very, very far from the norm in my area...
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ms-superwoman
by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:48 PM

They wouldn't do that here. We have an alternative school for kids who are failing and/or held back. After 20yrs you aren't allowed to go to the high school. After 21 there is adult ed and there is no cap on that. You can go until you are done.

momstermom85
by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 11:51 PM

this

Quoting ms-superwoman:

They wouldn't do that here. We have an alternative school for kids who are failing and/or held back. After 20yrs you aren't even allowed to go to the high school.


Janet
by Ruby Member on Feb. 28, 2013 at 7:43 AM

 This

Quoting Kris_PBG:

What you are reporting is very, very far from the norm in my area...

 

goddess99
by Michelle on Feb. 28, 2013 at 8:42 AM

I think we need better teachers, maybe then the kids wouldn't be held back. I was a senior in high school before I had 1 teacher who gave a shit. My dd isn't fairing any better than I did. Thankfully she's honor roll.

Maevelyn
by on Feb. 28, 2013 at 9:01 AM

It isn't what I'd call the norm. I believe that he was exploiting an exception that was put in place for students with disabilities. He went to a school that accommodated students with sever autism so they were used to schedules like his. It was a school that focused on inclusion, so kids would be slipt up into different classes based on their IEP. Unfortunately, in Duval, when you have a program in place for students with a need it tends to get bogged down with other students who, while facing personal problems, aren't actually who the program was intended for. They basically get every other school's problems. Don't get me wrong, some really good things happen because of these programs but you also end up with stuff that just doesn't feel right too. Inclusion of students who should be on about grade level with other kids is one thing (with many disabilities this has been proven to be the best way for them to form social and life skills) but to have it exploited like that - and upsetting parents so much that they don't want their "normal" kids in an inclusive classroom- I just can't see the benefit. 

Quoting ms-superwoman:

They wouldn't do that here. We have an alternative school for kids who are failing and/or held back. After 20yrs you aren't allowed to go to the high school.


Maevelyn
by on Feb. 28, 2013 at 9:12 AM

In my field experience the biggest complaint was that the curriculum was so micromanaged that you really didn't have the ability to tailor lesson plans for your students. I think the point that I lost faith was when I was observing a junior year English classroom and the kids were working out of workbooks, like you would see in a 2nd or 3rd grade classroom. The teacher explained that she could only teach what was in the workbook, use the handouts and enrichment materials that came with the curriculum and that she had to be with in so many lessons (no more than so many behind or a head) on any given day. I just find both aspects insulting to the teachers and the students. 

Quoting goddess99:

I think we need better teachers, maybe then the kids wouldn't be held back. I was a senior in high school before I had 1 teacher who gave a shit. My dd isn't fairing any better than I did. Thankfully she's honor roll.


goddess99
by Michelle on Feb. 28, 2013 at 9:16 AM

I've heard this complaint as well from teachers at my dd's last school.

Quoting Maevelyn:

In my field experience the biggest complaint was that the curriculum was so micromanaged that you really didn't have the ability to tailor lesson plans for your students. I think the point that I lost faith was when I was observing a junior year English classroom and the kids were working out of workbooks, like you would see in a 2nd or 3rd grade classroom. The teacher explained that she could only teach what was in the workbook, use the handouts and enrichment materials that came with the curriculum and that she had to be with in so many lessons (no more than so many behind or a head) on any given day. I just find both aspects insulting to the teachers and the students. 

Quoting goddess99:

I think we need better teachers, maybe then the kids wouldn't be held back. I was a senior in high school before I had 1 teacher who gave a shit. My dd isn't fairing any better than I did. Thankfully she's honor roll.



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