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My dd school is "peanut safe" which means nothing made from peanuts or tree nuts can enter the building.

Both my dd are picky eaters. They do not like cold
Cut sandwiches and they can't bring in leftovers cause they are not allowed to heat them up....

I understand the deadly affect nuts have on those who unfortunately have the allergy but what about my girls?? I feel as though my girls rights are being infringed upon. If they were able to bring peanut butter I know they would be eating lunch and getting some protein.

One daughter doesn't eat cheese ....what am I supposed to feed them??

Do any of you have this situation at your school? What are your thoughts??
by on Aug. 1, 2013 at 9:54 AM
Replies (71-80):
cindilou13
by on Aug. 6, 2013 at 2:20 PM

Try talking to them.  Showing them the item, I know Wowbutter anyway has a letter template you can send to school with them confirming what it is.  Our school isn't nut free but if they were I would work on making it ok to take the substitutes.  I've never heard of a school with a ban not even allowing PB substitutes as long as you can confirm what it is (not that some don't, just not around here, and seveal districts are nut free in the area).



Quoting rosiemarie:

I know sun nut butter is great but they won't let us bring that either cause its too hard to dicipher if its nut or not so they say

So that's out also!


Quoting SlapItHigh:

Also, we just use sun nut butter made from sunflower seeds.  It tastes just as good!  There is also almond butter and cashew butter and other options.




emsmom627
by on Aug. 6, 2013 at 2:38 PM

the only thing your child eats is peanut buttter?

F_Stathouse
by on Aug. 6, 2013 at 2:46 PM
I have peanut allergies. Sun Butter my kids love and it's crunchy. It's just sunflower seeds. And WowButter is yummy! My SO goes through 5 jars in a week. Wish they made bigger jars; lol.
Quoting cindilou13:

Try talking to them.  Showing them the item, I know Wowbutter anyway has a letter template you can send to school with them confirming what it is.  Our school isn't nut free but if they were I would work on making it ok to take the substitutes.  I've never heard of a school with a ban not even allowing PB substitutes as long as you can confirm what it is (not that some don't, just not around here, and seveal districts are nut free in the area).



Quoting rosiemarie:

I know sun nut butter is great but they won't let us bring that either cause its too hard to dicipher if its nut or not so they say

So that's out also!


Quoting SlapItHigh:

Also, we just use sun nut butter made from sunflower seeds.  It tastes just as good!  There is also almond butter and cashew butter and other options.





Blue231
by on Aug. 6, 2013 at 2:49 PM
1 mom liked this
One meal my son eats is tossed salad. (You can sprinkle any salad topper on the salad like dried cranberries for extra flavor.) He takes Hawaiian whole wheat rolls with butter on salad days, because those are his favorite rolls.

Another meal he likes is crackers with pepperoni and cheese. He hates most cheese, but we experimented with a variety of cheese and found that he likes Babel cheese. Or we send him a drinkable yogurt instead of the cheese.

Ds also eats pita pockets stuffed with shredded lettuce, tomato, shredded carrots. (He does not like lunch meat, so he eats his sandwiches with all veggies.) He takes a little side of either Italian dressing or Taco Sauce to pour into the pocket at lunch time. This is great served with pretzel rods and apple sauce.

As a treat he gets a pizza lunchable with fresh fruit once a week.

Sometimes Ds eats breakfast for lunch: a baggie of cereal, thermos of milk or juice, a poptart, and fresh fruit. If your child feels the need for peanut butter every day, she can have her peanut butter sandwich at breakfast (or peanut butter toast). Just flip the meals and the times you serve them.

Other things we have packed for him include tortilla chips and salsa, sunflower seeds (Some brands are peanut free and some are not peanut free, so check packages), pickles, dried banana chips or other dried fruit, muffins, hard boiled eggs, bagels with jelly or cream cheese, pasta salad with veggies and Italian dressing; etc.

My son hates a lot of foods. It took us time to come up with these options, but we have found some good options. He goes back and forth between what he likes from year to year, so we just keep experimenting.

My Dd eats a larger variety of foods, so her lunches are easier to pack. She enjoys using a thermos for warm leftovers like Mac n Cheese.

She will even eat just plain jelly sandwiches. We use different types of bread, rolls, and wraps so she has variety. (Cookie cutters makes them into shape sandwiches.) I usually send her something crunchy to go with it like honey whole wheat pretzels and carrot sticks.

You can do biscuits with honey (Pack a damp paper towel in a ziplock for sticky fingers, though.), red pears (they are nice and sweet), raisins, and serve along side salted cucumber sticks and sweet colorful peppers.

After a while you'll come up with more ideas. It does help to serve a good breakfast and healthy after school snack to round things out for kiddos that are picky about packed lunches.

If your child doesn't like cold cuts, she might like home grilled strips of chicken breast in a sandwich, cold meatloaf sandwiches in a bun, or home baked sliced or cubed ham instead of the cold cut lunch meat. I think leftover home grilled or baked tastes a lot better than cold cuts. You can cook up extra, slice, freeze, and thaw for lunches.

I hope at least a couple of those suggestions are helpful for you and your daughters. You may find that skipping the peanut butter at lunch helps your kids get interested in eating a larger and healthier variety of foods once they get used to it.
rosiemarie
by on Aug. 6, 2013 at 3:43 PM
Do you know we used to have a peanut free table (still couldn't bring on) but the patents were complaining cause it singled their child out......go figure


Quoting Pammi86:

I work for a school and we simply seperate the kids. We have a peanut free zone and it seems to work well. However I understand stopping it all together bc this has become such a serious issue! Some kids even get a smell and can die from it! I guess it isn't really fair but I understand why some schools are limiting this and making it a peanut free zone! It can kill! However here is something you can try! Our school district no longer serves pb&j! We switched to something called Sun butter! Its made from sun flower seeds and is very similar to pb! Our kids actually seem to not mind it! I would try this for your girls!!!


rosiemarie
by on Aug. 6, 2013 at 3:45 PM
1 mom liked this
Both my girls enjoy salad so I think I will send it with them this year.

You do have many great suggestions I am gonna try quite a few more!


Quoting Blue231:

One meal my son eats is tossed salad. (You can sprinkle any salad topper on the salad like dried cranberries for extra flavor.) He takes Hawaiian whole wheat rolls with butter on salad days, because those are his favorite rolls.



Another meal he likes is crackers with pepperoni and cheese. He hates most cheese, but we experimented with a variety of cheese and found that he likes Babel cheese. Or we send him a drinkable yogurt instead of the cheese.



Ds also eats pita pockets stuffed with shredded lettuce, tomato, shredded carrots. (He does not like lunch meat, so he eats his sandwiches with all veggies.) He takes a little side of either Italian dressing or Taco Sauce to pour into the pocket at lunch time. This is great served with pretzel rods and apple sauce.



As a treat he gets a pizza lunchable with fresh fruit once a week.



Sometimes Ds eats breakfast for lunch: a baggie of cereal, thermos of milk or juice, a poptart, and fresh fruit. If your child feels the need for peanut butter every day, she can have her peanut butter sandwich at breakfast (or peanut butter toast). Just flip the meals and the times you serve them.



Other things we have packed for him include tortilla chips and salsa, sunflower seeds (Some brands are peanut free and some are not peanut free, so check packages), pickles, dried banana chips or other dried fruit, muffins, hard boiled eggs, bagels with jelly or cream cheese, pasta salad with veggies and Italian dressing; etc.



My son hates a lot of foods. It took us time to come up with these options, but we have found some good options. He goes back and forth between what he likes from year to year, so we just keep experimenting.



My Dd eats a larger variety of foods, so her lunches are easier to pack. She enjoys using a thermos for warm leftovers like Mac n Cheese.



She will even eat just plain jelly sandwiches. We use different types of bread, rolls, and wraps so she has variety. (Cookie cutters makes them into shape sandwiches.) I usually send her something crunchy to go with it like honey whole wheat pretzels and carrot sticks.



You can do biscuits with honey (Pack a damp paper towel in a ziplock for sticky fingers, though.), red pears (they are nice and sweet), raisins, and serve along side salted cucumber sticks and sweet colorful peppers.



After a while you'll come up with more ideas. It does help to serve a good breakfast and healthy after school snack to round things out for kiddos that are picky about packed lunches.



If your child doesn't like cold cuts, she might like home grilled strips of chicken breast in a sandwich, cold meatloaf sandwiches in a bun, or home baked sliced or cubed ham instead of the cold cut lunch meat. I think leftover home grilled or baked tastes a lot better than cold cuts. You can cook up extra, slice, freeze, and thaw for lunches.



I hope at least a couple of those suggestions are helpful for you and your daughters. You may find that skipping the peanut butter at lunch helps your kids get interested in eating a larger and healthier variety of foods once they get used to it.

Pammi86
by Pamela on Aug. 6, 2013 at 3:53 PM


Wow! Noone can really win here ya know! But its better your child sits alone than has a reaction! I would talk to your local district about Sun Butter as an option on their school menu! Then maybe your child could buy a few times a week if you can rally some other parents and get it on the menu! Then there is not risk of someone bringing something they are not suppose to! But it really makes me wonder...are the teachers following this for their lunch too? Who's to say they arent going out to lunch and eating it! Its just all around crazy which is why my district made the Sun Butter option!

Quoting rosiemarie:

Do you know we used to have a peanut free table (still couldn't bring on) but the patents were complaining cause it singled their child out......go figure


Quoting Pammi86:

I work for a school and we simply seperate the kids. We have a peanut free zone and it seems to work well. However I understand stopping it all together bc this has become such a serious issue! Some kids even get a smell and can die from it! I guess it isn't really fair but I understand why some schools are limiting this and making it a peanut free zone! It can kill! However here is something you can try! Our school district no longer serves pb&j! We switched to something called Sun butter! Its made from sun flower seeds and is very similar to pb! Our kids actually seem to not mind it! I would try this for your girls!!!




cstargarner
by Member on Aug. 7, 2013 at 12:22 AM

 First, you said "if all my child will eat is PB&J..." so that's how I responded.  And I said "someone" and "if" that was the case...  If that's not the case for you then i'm not talking about you.  Also, you're still saying your kid shouldn't be "penalized" because someone else has an allergy, like your child would be more special or matter more than the other kid.  Personally, I just think of it as what if that was my kid and what could I do as a parent to help that other mom whose life has got to already be so complicated without other parents throwing fits about what their kid can't bring in their lunch for one meal out of the day.  Everyone needs to be nice and try walking in eachother's shoes instead of just worrying about ourselves.  It would be a good thing to teach our kids that example instead of teaching them that they/I/whoever are the only ones who matter and screw the next guy if what they want doesn't work with what we work.  Again, speaking generally.  I don't know you.  If you take offense, maybe something there hit a little close to home? 


Quoting Diane1223:

If a child is so allergic that he is she cannot be around it, why should my child be penalized? I don't think that is fair, either. Don't put words in my mouth, I never said that it was more important than another child living or breathing....WOW!!!....talk about taking it to the extreme!!! Oh, and my kid will like lots of different foods, so it shouldn't be an issue. I am a good parent, so don't question my parenting skills.


Quoting cstargarner:

 your kid's right to a pb&j is more important than someone else's kid's right to breathe or live?  I can't understand that reasoning.  If all someone's kid will eat is pb&j, that's a parenting issue.


 


Quoting Diane1223:

I think it is ridiculous that because one or two children are allergic to peanuts or peanut butter, the whole school is banned from bringing anything with peanuts, peanut butter, or anything that looks like peanut butter. If all my child will eat is PB & J...guess what...that's what she is bringing for lunch, and I will have a talk with the principal.

I think that a lot of alternative suggestions were good to bring, but if your child won't eat tuna salad, egg salad, Ravoli, spaghettios, soup, etc., then I am not sure..

 


 



 

cstargarner
by Member on Aug. 7, 2013 at 12:30 AM

 As I said replying to another poster, I just think we should all try to step in eachothers' shoes and teach our children to think of others and make sacrifices when necessary when it keeps someone else from being sick..  I don't honestly know how they handle it as adults.  Maybe as they get older they grow more immune?  Maybe they just carry an epi pen?  Maybe they never leave their houses?  I'm so blessed to not have a child with an allergy that serious but I 100% support doing what needs to be done to help another mom not worry that her kid won't live through the school day.  Everyone just needs to stop and think- what if this was your kid?  Would you want to just be locked inside all day, have to homeschool your kids when that wasn't the plan, you needed to work..  Is your (or anyone else's) kid's pb&j worth another child's safety?  The parents of these kids are under enough stress without a riot breaking out bc ppl can't teach their kids to eat something else.  We need to teach our kids (and some of us need to learn) to care about others and make sacrifices to help other ppl for no other reason than it's the right thing to do.  As for your silly comment about making the world peanut free- it's ridiculous.  I don't know why you're debating it.  It's a fact that some of these ppl have MAJOR reactions to these allergens.  I'm just putting the info out there for ppl who think it's just about the kid who eats peanuts and don't realize they can have reactions from just being around something.


Quoting MochaBerry24:

So then the rest of the world should also be peanut free as well then? 

Quoting cstargarner:

 some of these kids' throats close up just from walking down the peanut butter aisle at the store... not touching or eating ANYTHING.  Sometimes it's not an issue about being cautious.  No one's right to a pb&j is more important than a kid's right to breathe or live.

 

Quoting MochaBerry24:

I think it's completely ridicilious to ban food from an entire school because someone has an allergy. The person with the allergy needs to be extra cautious and should know how to avoid an allergen. 

 

 



 

rosiemarie
by on Aug. 7, 2013 at 6:53 AM
What does your child/children being to school lunch??


Quoting cstargarner:

 First, you said "if all my child will eat is PB&J..." so that's how I responded.  And I said "someone" and "if" that was the case...  If that's not the case for you then i'm not talking about you.  Also, you're still saying your kid shouldn't be "penalized" because someone else has an allergy, like your child would be more special or matter more than the other kid.  Personally, I just think of it as what if that was my kid and what could I do as a parent to help that other mom whose life has got to already be so complicated without other parents throwing fits about what their kid can't bring in their lunch for one meal out of the day.  Everyone needs to be nice and try walking in eachother's shoes instead of just worrying about ourselves.  It would be a good thing to teach our kids that example instead of teaching them that they/I/whoever are the only ones who matter and screw the next guy if what they want doesn't work with what we work.  Again, speaking generally.  I don't know you.  If you take offense, maybe something there hit a little close to home? 




Quoting Diane1223:

If a child is so allergic that he is she cannot be around it, why should my child be penalized? I don't think that is fair, either. Don't put words in my mouth, I never said that it was more important than another child living or breathing....WOW!!!....talk about taking it to the extreme!!! Oh, and my kid will like lots of different foods, so it shouldn't be an issue. I am a good parent, so don't question my parenting skills.



Quoting cstargarner:


 your kid's right to a pb&j is more important than someone else's kid's right to breathe or live?  I can't understand that reasoning.  If all someone's kid will eat is pb&j, that's a parenting issue.



 



Quoting Diane1223:

I think it is ridiculous that because one or two children are allergic to peanuts or peanut butter, the whole school is banned from bringing anything with peanuts, peanut butter, or anything that looks like peanut butter. If all my child will eat is PB & J...guess what...that's what she is bringing for lunch, and I will have a talk with the principal.

I think that a lot of alternative suggestions were good to bring, but if your child won't eat tuna salad, egg salad, Ravoli, spaghettios, soup, etc., then I am not sure..


 



 





 


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