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Disney Tells Disabled Guest to "Wait in Line"!

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I read earlier today that Disney was going to overhaul their policies for guests with disabilities to curb abuse.

Earlier this year there was a story about wealthy New Yorkers who hire people with disabilites to go to the Disney parks with them, so they can line jump to the front. Instead of waiting in line for say 2 hours for an attraction, it can be a matter of minutes in wait time.

People were of course upset about this and I guess Disney took notice because they are no longer going to allow people with disabilities to line jump. Instead they are going to be more consistent and offer something like the Fast Pass that all guests can access.

Now advocates and families of people with disabilites are upset about the changes brought on by those who abused the system.

What are your thoughts? Do you think it is fair of Disney to essentially punish all persons with disabilites for the abuse of a few?
Do you think that people with disabilities should get preferential treatment or should they have to wait in line like everyone else?


by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 11:28 PM
Replies (181-190):
famiglia_bella
by on Sep. 26, 2013 at 4:16 AM
1 mom liked this
Nail, head, HIT. Several ARE coming off as snobby or uppity, speaking of disabled people wanting to be treated normal but feeling entitled to privileges... WTF? This entire issue had NOTHING to do with disabled people, but greedy people with too much money and time on their hands to hire persons that would help them cut lines. My daughter is disabled and hardly feels entitled to anything. And it's beyond ridiculous to suggest she should skip Disney because it's a "privilege not a right" (reallyduh) and she can't stand for long periods of time. It was hard not to be offended at some of these comments. I had to keep calm and keep it moving.
Quoting NvmbrBean29:

And what some of you are forgetting to remember, if you've even been to Disney is once you rent a wheelchair, and try to take that wheelchair in line like everyone else, they will actually pull you out of the line and make you wait in the designated wheelchair isle. If you are able to walk and stand in line then yes park your wheelchair but if you can't stand on your feet because of a medical condition or because you are severely disabled, then having that line for a wheelchair shouldn't be taken away because some snobby people, like most of you commenting, think that disabled people get a rise out of "jumping the line" that is far from the reason!! I take total offense to this. My best friends brother is disabled and if Disney ever told her that she had to make her son wait in line like everyone else and struggle to get his wheelchair through a crowded line, she would most definitely give Disney a piece of her mind!

Daisy79
by on Sep. 26, 2013 at 5:10 PM

How has no one brought up that many of the lines at Disney involve stairs or other obstacles impassible by a wheelchair (or other disability)?  What would be the solution for  those lines, if you think they should just wait w/ everyone else?

gmoen1977
by on Sep. 27, 2013 at 7:01 PM

Being disabled myself I see no problem with their new policy of take a time and come back at that time to get on the ride.  I see that as still fair.

jessie0221
by on Sep. 27, 2013 at 7:06 PM

I find it completely fair.  Its unfirtunate but all you ever hear from the disabled is how they wish to be treated like a "normal" person.  Well guess what?  Normal people have to wait in line.  Normal people have to walk from the end of a 10 acre parking lot with children in tow.  Don't ask for equal treatment and then bitch because you get it.

jessie0221
by on Sep. 27, 2013 at 7:09 PM


Our nearest theme park is Holiday World in Indiana and the lines for their rides are all ramps that are wide enough to accomodate wheelchairs.  They also have a place to stash your stuff.  It wouldn't be much of a hassle to turn the stairs into ramps I wouldn't think.

Quoting Daisy79:

How has no one brought up that many of the lines at Disney involve stairs or other obstacles impassible by a wheelchair (or other disability)?  What would be the solution for  those lines, if you think they should just wait w/ everyone else?



AngelSinger
by Member on Sep. 28, 2013 at 3:08 AM

I've been to Disneyland twice in the past few years. I am disabled, and was treated very well. You don't really "line jump" in most cases. You go in a different entrance, let the operator know you need help, and they fit you in. I was never immediately put on a ride. I still had to wait. Which is just fine with me.

Did I wait a shorter time? Sometimes. Certainly not always, such as the line for Pixie Hollow or Indiana Jones. Some rides in California Adventure are all-inclusive, with no disabled lines. It was a relief at times, to not have to figure out which line or entrance I was supposed to use. In Fantasyland, you go in the exit. Very easy and convenient.

Maybe it's because my disability is pretty obvious, maybe it's because I was polite and never made demands and always thanked the operators for their help (especially when they had to stop a ride for me, such as Buzz Lightyear Astro Blasters), but I never had any problem. They treated me with the upmost respect and were quick to help if I needed it. They were especially wonderful at the hotel (we stay at the Disneyland). 

I think the only people who are going to notice a change are those who demand to be first or next. That's not fair. Accessibility does not mean favored status. You go in a different way and you will probably wait less (you can make that definite with a fast pass). They treat you politely and help if needed. That's all we as disabled persons have a right to expect. 

celestegood
by Gold Member on Sep. 28, 2013 at 8:39 PM
1 mom liked this
I am sorry they are not doing this, for people like you. You seem very respectful.

Quoting AngelSinger:

I've been to Disneyland twice in the past few years. I am disabled, and was treated very well. You don't really "line jump" in most cases. You go in a different entrance, let the operator know you need help, and they fit you in. I was never immediately put on a ride. I still had to wait. Which is just fine with me.

Did I wait a shorter time? Sometimes. Certainly not always, such as the line for Pixie Hollow or Indiana Jones. Some rides in California Adventure are all-inclusive, with no disabled lines. It was a relief at times, to not have to figure out which line or entrance I was supposed to use. In Fantasyland, you go in the exit. Very easy and convenient.

Maybe it's because my disability is pretty obvious, maybe it's because I was polite and never made demands and always thanked the operators for their help (especially when they had to stop a ride for me, such as Buzz Lightyear Astro Blasters), but I never had any problem. They treated me with the upmost respect and were quick to help if I needed it. They were especially wonderful at the hotel (we stay at the Disneyland). 

I think the only people who are going to notice a change are those who demand to be first or next. That's not fair. Accessibility does not mean favored status. You go in a different way and you will probably wait less (you can make that definite with a fast pass). They treat you politely and help if needed. That's all we as disabled persons have a right to expect. 

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Mrs.Sells
by on Sep. 29, 2013 at 8:27 PM

Then take the money it would cost to take a family to Disney and buy them wheel chairs. 


Quoting NeonGirl9583:

They are too big for a stroller and their insurance wont pay for wheelchairs bc they can walk.


Quoting awesomemommy2:

Disney will make a reasonable accomodation and allow your children to stay in their stroller (or wheelchair) until they get on the ride.  

Problem solved.   



Quoting NeonGirl9583:

I think its bull snot! 2 of my kids can not stand up for more than 15 mins due to low muscle tone. they both wear braces on their feet. ppl shouldnt do what they do.







Mrs.Sells
by on Sep. 29, 2013 at 8:49 PM

DM1 for going on 19 years now. Blood sugars don't just drop that fast for no reason. Either he didn't eat or he gave too high of a bolus. Regardless, if he  didn't feel his BS dropping and it got to the point where he was confused then he has hypoglycemia unawareness. With this he shouldn't be left alone regardless of his age if it is going to be posing a risk to himself or others. 


Quoting Ladywithtwo:

What is your problem? He is a TEEN. I said that in my original reply. Teens get left alone. He will be living alone soon when he starts college. He's not a toddler.

Why don't you read what I've said and research type 1 DM before you keep being so argumentative.


Quoting awesomemommy2:

I'm sorry, I must have misunderstood your post or just assumed that you (or your husband) was with your child.   I didnt realize that you left a diabetic child alone at the park.   



Quoting Ladywithtwo:

He did have what he needed. When his bs drops suddenly (which it rarely does) he cannot think clearly. He was wearing his pack of supplies but was too confused to know what he needed.



Kids like mine are NOT why Disney changed the policy. People that faked an injury to ride in a wheelchair & skip lines are why they changed policies.




Quoting awesomemommy2:

If you know your child is diabetic why would you not have the proper medical/nutritional aides right there for him.   This is one of the reasons that Disney allows soft sided coolers into the parks.   




Quoting Ladywithtwo:

Their current fast pass system works well. I wish you could save your place in more than one line with it though.





We went last year & split up for a ride that my teen wanted to go on but the little one couldn't. He has type 1 diabetes. While in line his blood sugar dropped & he nearly passed out. He was ok but we had to run back across the park, explain our reasons to get to him in the line, and get him out. It worked out but if we could have skipped the lines & stayed together as a group it would have been easier. It's not just wheelchairs.






Quoting Jinxed8:

I'm going to be the devil's advocate here but why is it that if you're in a wheel chair you can't wait like everyone else ?   Any parents who's waited 1 hour in line for any ride at any park with a whiny 4 year old, knows it's hell.   I understand however, giving a person with a handicap more time to embark and disembark a ride, or get on first within their ride group but If you can't handle the lines, the wait, or whatever, sorry but don't go to a theme park !!  You don't want to wait in line buy a speed pass or what ever they are called. 










Mrs.Sells
by on Sep. 29, 2013 at 8:57 PM


Or perhaps the special needs people who accepted their money.......

Quoting Mama2JoshKatie:

If they are going to get mad at anyone it should be the wealthy snobs who think they are better than everyone else just because they have the money to bribe someone to cheat the system. They are the ones who ruined this for everyone else. It's very unfortunate that they have ruined this for the people who really needed it. I do agree with the new policy because it's the only way these idiots will be stopped. It's not like Disney is leavng the disabled high and dry either. Those fast pass type passes will be fine. We love fast pass. When we were there in July we didn't have to wait long at all for the rides we had fast passes for.



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