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Are these teachers crossing the line?

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There is a story about a middle school in Wisconsin that is taking heat for having their students play a game called "Cross the Line"

Basically the students, grades 5th - 8th are asked a series of probing questions and depending on what their answers are, are asked to step forward. A few of the questions were: " Do your parents drink?", "Has anyone in your family been to jail?" "Do you want to commit suicide?" etc

Parents are upset because they believe the 'game' is intrusive and many of these conversations that need to be had, should be left up to the parents. 
The principal was quoted as saying, "The intent of this activity was to build stronger, more respectful relationships between students".

Personally, I think it is too intrusive to ask certain questions and rather than building stronger more respectful relationships as the principal says, I think it is an open platform for bullying. Who is to say that the kids who do admit to having a parent in jail, or who has thought about cutting, won't be bullied as a result of sharing during this 'game'? While I am all for kids being respectful of each other, I don't know that this is the way to go about it.

Would you be upset by this type of 'game' at your kids school?

 

by on Feb. 4, 2014 at 7:05 AM
Replies (21-30):
IAMmomtotrips
by Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:24 AM
I teach high school and I do a similar lesson with my drama kids to teach emotional characterization on stage.

Students are asked to come to class with the most personal sad memory they have. They are asked not to act, but to just tell the memory. To show us the real in the memory.

It is a very hard lesson to do, but as actors, they grow leaps and bounds in their ability to act dramatically. They focus on the way people are when sad. The way the speak, the vocalizations, manners and actions.

It is a tough lesson and the kids and I struggle to make it through each year, but they grow as actors and a department when we do it.

However, this is an individual class and not middle schoolers. I don't know if I would be comfortable with it in middle school. High school would be a much different place.

Although, all I can think of is the scene in Mean Girls where they pull all the mean girls in the gym.
elzingah36
by Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:27 AM
Another proof that schools are entirely out of line. I'm wondering if there were any slips going home to get permission from parents? I highly doubt it. Every time I see something like this I count my and my children's lucky stars we homeschool.
Jenn8604
by Bronze Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:28 AM
1 mom liked this
This is a game the school counselor should be playing with each kid one on one ONLY and recommending other counseling when needed.
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JJJMommyKris
by New Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:36 AM
Too much, who is watching this game? Who is being reported to Cyfd for something that seems innocent? I think it is appropriately named though.
iamnameless
by Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:40 AM
1 mom liked this
Why not ask questions like who likes to go skating? Who likes to draw? Who likes to play football? This will help them find things in common without getting into very deep personal info that should not be shared in this way.
Honestly I would not have been comfortable playing that at that age. I would have refused.
MelanieMans
by Bronze Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:55 AM
2 moms liked this
They can't build stronger relationships between students without asking such personal questions?
Malissa1578
by Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 10:59 AM
Its one thing to make a subject like one of those questions brings up a final term paper or into a report for school and bringing it up in front of everyone... that just hands ammo to cruel kids to use against another kid. Its no one elses business.
Kellileanne
by Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 11:03 AM

 I can understand what they were trying to do, but I'm not sure the execution was successful.

Basherte
by Bronze Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 11:11 AM


Quoting IAMmomtotrips: I teach high school and I do a similar lesson with my drama kids to teach emotional characterization on stage.

Students are asked to come to class with the most personal sad memory they have. They are asked not to act, but to just tell the memory. To show us the real in the memory.

It is a very hard lesson to do, but as actors, they grow leaps and bounds in their ability to act dramatically. They focus on the way people are when sad. The way the speak, the vocalizations, manners and actions.

It is a tough lesson and the kids and I struggle to make it through each year, but they grow as actors and a department when we do it.

However, this is an individual class and not middle schoolers. I don't know if I would be comfortable with it in middle school. High school would be a much different place.

Although, all I can think of is the scene in Mean Girls where they pull all the mean girls in the gym.

I think they pulled all the girls into the gym. Then singled out the mean ones, by asking the rest of the girls if they had been bullied and such.

Loved that scene! 


chanelle25
by New Member on Feb. 4, 2014 at 11:11 AM
I think the idea that they had is good, but I feel they shouldve implemented it differently
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