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Meet the Teacher Night

By TheFamilyPants on Aug. 25, 2014 at 12:35 AM

Tomorrow we go to meet the teacher. It's a rite of passage for each new school year. So here I sit, ugh, I have a list of about 42 questions I want to ask her. When's this? What's that?  I want to convey to her all the amazing things about my child that she must see in him, too. I want to hold his hand the whole time. I want the teacher to tell me exactly what each day will look like. I want a schedule and a room with a 2 way mirror so I can just sit and watch him all day long. I want to jump into the future and already know that he is adjusted and happy to be going to school. 

But I won't do those things. I won't have those things. And I won't say those things. Because it's time for him to fly a little and I have no intention to make things harder on all of us by smothering everybody with my nervous energy and propensity to tear up all the time.


So here is what I WILL do...

1.   I will pare down my insanely long questions list to just two. His teacher will have 15 other parents to talk to tomorrow night. I will somehow find the 2-3 most important questions that I have and ask those.

2.  I will not hold his hand the whole time. I will instead walk in like it's no big deal and ask him to go explore the room alone. He can do it.

3.  After each day at school, I will ask HIM about the schedule and talk with him about his day.

4.  I will simply trust that his teacher will discover those amazing things about him. And she will see them in all of the kids in her class. He will be a part of a class. A team.

5.   I'm gonna have to keep myself calm, cool and collected. I can do that. I will be relaxed and smiling. Our kids take cues from us. My cue for him is that all will be well.  Because it will.

6.   I will NOT forget the school supplies. I will NOT forget the school supplies. I will NOT forget the school supplies.

It will be hard in the next week and honestly, I already have a bit of a lump in my throat. This change is a big deal and change has always been rather difficult for my kiddo. But, and this is important, he can do this and so can I. We've been preparing him for weeks.  Here we go...

Wish us luck!


Help me with my list, what do you ask your child's teacher on Meet the Teacher night?  

Image © iStock.com/ SerrNovik

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Replies (1-10):
  • tossed
  • by New Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 2:08 AM
  • Each day, ask him to tell you one new thing he learned that day.

    If your child tells you about something horrific, don't automatically think it is true. Approach each situation with an open mind and understand that children often misunderstand what they witness.

    Volunteer if it is possible. Children love to see their parents (as long as they are not nuts) at school events.

    Know that school work is increasingly difficult. Be prepared for tears. 

    Do not talk negatively about school assignments, other teachers, the principal, etc. 

    IF there is something that is bothering your child, please let the teacher know and do not assume she will figure it out. If there are family issues, please let the teacher know. You do not have to go into the deep details, but it helps teachers to know if there are family issues, job loss, major illnesses in the family, death of a pet, etc. 

    Good luck and have a great year!



  • Quote Reply
  • LaniBee
  • by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 7:47 AM
  • One of my biggest concerns when my girls were in the younger grades of Elementary school, was making sure we all understood the dismissal routine to go home. We were walkers/biker riders and sometimes they were unsure what to do if it was storming (we live in FL and it happens almost everyday in the afternoon). Once I knew the procedure the teacher would follow, I was able to reassure the girls (and myself!)

    And it can be pretty unsettling to think about your child trying to navigate the bus loop at the end of the day, so ask the teacher how the system works. :)

  • Quote Reply
  • Apr1l
  • by Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 9:49 AM
  • Oh this is helpful

    Quoting LaniBee:

    One of my biggest concerns when my girls were in the younger grades of Elementary school, was making sure we all understood the dismissal routine to go home. We were walkers/biker riders and sometimes they were unsure what to do if it was storming (we live in FL and it happens almost everyday in the afternoon). Once I knew the procedure the teacher would follow, I was able to reassure the girls (and myself!)

    And it can be pretty unsettling to think about your child trying to navigate the bus loop at the end of the day, so ask the teacher how the system works. :)

    Posted on CafeMom Mobile
  • Quote Reply
  • RobynS
  • by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 10:19 AM
  • DS is in 4th grade, so I mainly just listened to the teacher's spiel to see what, if anything, would be different in 4th than any of the other years. Not much, really...

    DD is in kindergarten and has the same teacher DS had. The curriculum is a bit different now (they're pushing kindergartners harder now), but I pretty much know the drill, so I didn't have too many questions.

  • Quote Reply
  • wandep
  • by Bronze Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 10:22 AM
  • We just introduce ourselves and look around the classroom. We only get from 1:30 - 3 pm to meet with 2 teachers. It goes by fast! They usually have open house a few weeks after school starts so you can ask questions then or shoot them an email during the week. Most of the stuff the teachers send home with you (paperwork) will have a detail page and can find most answers to questions in that.

  • Quote Reply
  • Madelaine
  • by Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 10:50 AM
  • Great advice!

    Quoting tossed:

    Each day, ask him to tell you one new thing he learned that day.

    If your child tells you about something horrific, don't automatically think it is true. Approach each situation with an open mind and understand that children often misunderstand what they witness.

    Volunteer if it is possible. Children love to see their parents (as long as they are not nuts) at school events.

    Know that school work is increasingly difficult. Be prepared for tears. 

    Do not talk negatively about school assignments, other teachers, the principal, etc. 

    IF there is something that is bothering your child, please let the teacher know and do not assume she will figure it out. If there are family issues, please let the teacher know. You do not have to go into the deep details, but it helps teachers to know if there are family issues, job loss, major illnesses in the family, death of a pet, etc. 

    Good luck and have a great year!




  • Quote Reply
  • la_bella_vita
  • by Silver Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 12:10 PM
  • My children's teachers prepared so much information for us, that none one of the parents in the room had a question! I was very impressed and felt fully prepared to face this year.

    If they had not been so through, I would have asked about homework policies and e-mail contact.

    Our teachers love to e-mail us and I apperciate that, last year, when an issue popped up with my son, the teacher spent every day e-mailing me until we got it resolved, I really apperciated that.

  • Quote Reply
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