Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Healthy Living Healthy Living

Myth vs. Facts about HFCS - THOUGHTS???????

Posted by on May. 14, 2012 at 10:01 AM
  • 9 Replies

A ha!  I clicked on the little ad right on a CM page....and it brought this up (BTW, notice the page title in the link):

from the site:  http://www.sweetsurprise.com/hfcs-myths-and-facts?utm_source=CafeMom&utm_medium=banner&utm_content=728x90_Group-Targeted-Parenting-Groups&utm_campaign=sweet-surprise

Myth vs. Facts

You’ve probably seen the negative headlines about high fructose corn syrup. Have you ever wondered if the media hype is true? Let us dispel some of the HFCS myths. Here are some of the most common inaccurate statements about this misunderstood sweetener along with the actual reality.

Myth: Sugar is healthier than high fructose corn syrup.
Reality: Afraid not. High fructose corn syrup is basically the same as sugar—both in terms of composition and in the number of calories they contain. Since high fructose corn syrup and sugar are so similar, the human body absorbs them the same way.

Myth: High fructose corn syrup is to blame for obesity and diabetes.
Reality: Nope. There is no scientific evidence that high fructose corn syrup is to blame for obesity and diabetes. In fact, the U.S. Department of Agriculture data shows that consumption of high fructose corn syrup has actually been declining while obesity and diabetes rates continued to rise (see chart). Around the world, obesity levels are also rising even though HFCS consumption is limited outside of the U.S. Many other factors contribute to rising obesity levels including changes in lifestyle, diet and exercise and are unrelated to HFCS.

“High fructose corn syrup is one of the most misunderstood products in the food supply.”
David S. Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School. NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams, April 22, 2009
 

Myth: High fructose corn syrup is not natural.
Reality: Wrong again. High fructose corn syrup is made from corn, a natural grain product and is a natural sweetener. High fructose corn syrup contains no artificial or synthetic ingredients or color additives. It also meets the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s requirements for use of the term “natural.”

Myth: High fructose corn syrup is sweeter than sugar.
Reality: Sorry, no. High fructose corn syrup and sugar have almost the same level of sweetness. HFCS was made to provide the same sweetness as sugar so that consumers would not notice a difference in sweetness or taste. In fact, the type of HFCS commonly used in foods is actually less sweet than sugar.

Myth: High fructose corn syrup is high in fructose.
Reality: Oddly enough, it’s not. Contrary to its name, high fructose corn syrup is not high in fructose. It has levels of fructose to create a similar composition to sugar. It has either 42% or 55% fructose, which is comparable to sugar with 50% fructose.

Myth: Studies conducted with pure fructose can be applied to high fructose corn syrup.
Reality: That is not scientifically feasible. Pure fructose and its effect on the body are extremely different from that of high fructose corn syrup. Most studies conducted with pure fructose have been performed with abnormally high levels of fructose which do not occur naturally in our diet. Fructose and glucose are always consumed in combination, with glucose acting as a moderator to fructose. By analyzing fructose independently, the studies are not representative of normal diets and cannot be applied to high fructose corn syrup which contains both fructose and glucose.

Myth: High fructose corn syrup is metabolized differently and blocks the body’s ability to know when it is full.
Reality: Untrue. In fact, multiple studies have shown that high fructose corn syrup has similar effects on feelings of fullness as sugar and 1% milk. This includes research done by the University of Washington, Maastricht University in the Netherlands, University of Toronto and University of Rhode Island. All of these studies found no differences in the metabolic effects of high fructose corn syrup as compared to sugar.

Myth: High fructose corn syrup contains DNA from genetically modified corn.
Reality: Nope. While the corn used to produce high fructose corn syrup may have been produced using genetically modified corn, existing research indicates that corn DNA cannot be detected in measurable amounts in high fructose corn syrup.

Myths: High fructose corn syrup is banned in the European Union.
Reality: It’s not. In 1977, the EU employed national production quotas to protect domestic sugar producers by limiting the supply of competitive sweeteners including high fructose syrup. The goal of the EU sugar policy regime is to regulate competition afforded by other sweeteners, not to specifically ban the use of HFCS.

Myth: High fructose corn syrup is subsidized.
Reality: Wrong. Manufacturers of high fructose corn syrup do not receive government subsidies. Contrary to what you may have heard, high fructose corn syrup is not a protected commodity. Rather, it is subject to all of the highs and lows of marketplace supply and demand. The corn used to make high fructose corn syrup is purchased on the open market and is subject to trade activity at the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT). The only caloric sweeteners that benefit directly from government support programs in the United States are sugar and honey. While the U.S. Department of Agriculture does not regulate high fructose corn syrup prices or control supply, the Farm Bill provides a safety net to certain corn farmers in the United States if the crop price falls below certain levels. This supports corn growers, not corn refiners. Refiners of these commodities do not receive any government support.

by on May. 14, 2012 at 10:01 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-9):
mandee1503
by Silver Member on May. 14, 2012 at 11:40 AM

Interesting. It's been on the news and on commercials for a while about HFCS, but I like this article because it explains it more.

Rota
by Member on May. 14, 2012 at 7:48 PM
1 mom liked this

And you believe that???? The so called scientific data comes from the corn industry. Do you REALLY think that they would give you unbiased opinions?

The scientists ( the ones that have no vested (mnetary) interest in the corn or sugar industry will tell you that yes, the two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Just like fructose and sucrose are similar in caloric values, their metabolic process is different.

michiganmom116
by Platinum Member on May. 14, 2012 at 7:57 PM


Quoting Rota:

And you believe that???? The so called scientific data comes from the corn industry. Do you REALLY think that they would give you unbiased opinions?

The scientists ( the ones that have no vested (mnetary) interest in the corn or sugar industry will tell you that yes, the two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Just like fructose and sucrose are similar in caloric values, their metabolic process is different.

I agree!

FWIW, sugar can also contribute to high triglyceride levels.

MrsTBailey
by on May. 14, 2012 at 8:36 PM
1 mom liked this
Actually i would have to disagree with you on this one: two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Because i believe that those so called scientists are comparing HFCS with White Sugar which is what they always show on every news documentary and on the today show when they are comparing sugars in everything from soft drinks to processed foods. Now i would agree with you if you were talking about sugar in its rawest forms which is what i buy at the stores sugar in the raw or natural cane turbinado sugar then yes you would be correct in saying that HFCS and this sugar is very different chemically. I try to limit chemically made foods even though somedays i want to eat it. :-)

Quoting Rota:

And you believe that???? The so called scientific data comes from the corn industry. Do you REALLY think that they would give you unbiased opinions?

The scientists ( the ones that have no vested (mnetary) interest in the corn or sugar industry will tell you that yes, the two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Just like fructose and sucrose are similar in caloric values, their metabolic process is different.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
sassymomntx1961
by Yvonne on May. 15, 2012 at 10:38 PM

very interesting

GOD first ppl next things last you cant go wrong and w/ GOD and JESUS around you,you will be a a triple strand rope

celestegood
by Ruby Member on May. 28, 2012 at 6:29 PM
Thank you. Everything you said is true!

Quoting MrsTBailey:

Actually i would have to disagree with you on this one: two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Because i believe that those so called scientists are comparing HFCS with White Sugar which is what they always show on every news documentary and on the today show when they are comparing sugars in everything from soft drinks to processed foods. Now i would agree with you if you were talking about sugar in its rawest forms which is what i buy at the stores sugar in the raw or natural cane turbinado sugar then yes you would be correct in saying that HFCS and this sugar is very different chemically. I try to limit chemically made foods even though somedays i want to eat it. :-)



Quoting Rota:

And you believe that???? The so called scientific data comes from the corn industry. Do you REALLY think that they would give you unbiased opinions?

The scientists ( the ones that have no vested (mnetary) interest in the corn or sugar industry will tell you that yes, the two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Just like fructose and sucrose are similar in caloric values, their metabolic process is different.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
celestegood
by Ruby Member on May. 28, 2012 at 7:34 PM
1 mom liked this
I actually think this is true. The data is from the corn industry. Why else would they do the research? Research can be made to prove anything.

Quoting Rota:

And you believe that???? The so called scientific data comes from the corn industry. Do you REALLY think that they would give you unbiased opinions?

The scientists ( the ones that have no vested (mnetary) interest in the corn or sugar industry will tell you that yes, the two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Just like fructose and sucrose are similar in caloric values, their metabolic process is different.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
celestegood
by Ruby Member on May. 28, 2012 at 7:34 PM
That is true, though.

Quoting michiganmom116:


Quoting Rota:

And you believe that???? The so called scientific data comes from the corn industry. Do you REALLY think that they would give you unbiased opinions?

The scientists ( the ones that have no vested (mnetary) interest in the corn or sugar industry will tell you that yes, the two are similar in caloric values but that is where their similarity ends. HFCS is NOT metabolized the same as  sugar and is quickly converted to triglycerides in the liver. Just like fructose and sucrose are similar in caloric values, their metabolic process is different.

I agree!

FWIW, sugar can also contribute to high triglyceride levels.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
PinkButterfly66
by on Jun. 18, 2012 at 9:12 PM
3 moms liked this

There have been more than a few credible studies that link HFCS to diabetes and yes HFCS is not natural like cane sugar, it is a man-made manufactured product.  Cane sugar (so far) is not GMO.  Beet sugar is GMO, it was approved last year.  HFCS IS made from GMO corn.  And there are studies coming out about just how damaging GMO products are to our bodies--freakin' scary.  

All of this info is from the HFCS manufactures.  Do you really think they would say anything negative?   I avoid all products with HFCS.  

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)