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Family Meal Solutions Family Meal Solutions

How do you make your Thanksgiving Turkey?

Posted by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 4:20 PM
  • 14 Replies

How do you generally roast your turkey each year?

I usually make ours in my rival roaster oven.  It makes the most moist and juicy meat but it doesn't really crisp up on the outside. That isn't a big deal to me though, because I don't really like the skin anyways. Dh does though, so I might give it at shot in the oven this year. 

I usually make a mixture of oil, sage, rosemary, thyme, garlic, salt and pepper. Then I rub it all over the in and outside of the bird, and in between the skin.   Then I put the remaining leafs of seasoning, a quarterd onion, garlic cloves and a lemon in the cavity. 

Share how you usually make your turkey!

by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 4:20 PM
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Replies (1-10):
funglemuggle
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 4:22 PM
In a foil pan in a oven bag. LOL
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RADmomma
by Sara on Nov. 20, 2012 at 4:55 PM

 similar to you. I mix some seasonings with butter & coat the bird under the skin & on top... then I toss some onion, peppers, and garlic inside the bird... then roast in the oven

BelindaDuvessa
by Member on Nov. 20, 2012 at 8:48 PM

Here's a question.....who cooks it breast down as opposed to up?

AmosFarkle
by AmyV on Nov. 21, 2012 at 9:34 PM

I'll never do another one without BRINING it for a day or so.  It makes such a difference in the moistness.  Then I pretty much roast it like a chicken, making sure I oil the outside and stuff the cavity with something....either real "stuffing" or just some big chunks of root veggies.  I do like to put some butter and herbs under the skin.

AmosFarkle
by AmyV on Nov. 21, 2012 at 9:37 PM

Belinda, I've never known anybody who cooked it breast-side-down.  Do you?  How does it turn out?  Do you have it in a cooking bag or on a rack or just in a pan?  Enquiring minds, yanno.... wink

Noni2319
by Chrissy on Nov. 21, 2012 at 10:48 PM
My grandmother makes it. :)
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stellarmom1
by Becca on Nov. 21, 2012 at 10:54 PM
I've need brined one before, how do you do it?

Quoting AmosFarkle:

I'll never do another one without BRINING it for a day or so.  It makes such a difference in the moistness.  Then I pretty much roast it like a chicken, making sure I oil the outside and stuff the cavity with something....either real "stuffing" or just some big chunks of root veggies.  I do like to put some butter and herbs under the skin.

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Family4Eternity
by on Nov. 22, 2012 at 2:23 AM

Reynolds turkey oven bags & foil pans are WONDERFUL!! lol
I place my turkey in it , cover it with butter & seasonings then bake as instructed. I have never had a dry turkey.

AmosFarkle
by AmyV on Nov. 22, 2012 at 7:29 AM
1 mom liked this

Becca, there are several "recipes" out there, but basically it's soaking the bird in a solution of saltwater with sugar and spices.  It needs to stay pretty cold, of course, so I use a big cooler and use ice water --- adding ice every now and then.

After it has soaked for several hours, you pull it out and rinse it off before you proceed with however you usually cook it.

I'll see if I can find a good recipe and post it, although this year it's a little late to start, of course.  That is, unless you plan to have turkey for Christmas or Hanukkah too.

AmosFarkle
by AmyV on Nov. 22, 2012 at 7:35 AM

Here's Alton Brown's version.  It's probably really good, and he goes into detail about how to go about the process.

Ingredients

  • 1 (14 to 16 pound) frozen young turkey

For the brine:

  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 gallon vegetable stock
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons allspice berries
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped candied ginger
  • 1 gallon heavily iced water

For the aromatics:

  • 1 red apple, sliced
  • 1/2 onion, sliced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 cup water
  • 4 sprigs rosemary
  • 6 leaves sage
  • Canola oil

Directions

Click here to see how it's done.

2 to 3 days before roasting:

Begin thawing the turkey in the refrigerator or in a cooler kept at 38 degrees F.

Combine the vegetable stock, salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, allspice berries, and candied ginger in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Stir occasionally to dissolve solids and bring to a boil. Then remove the brine from the heat, cool to room temperature, and refrigerate.

Early on the day or the night before you'd like to eat:

Combine the brine, water and ice in the 5-gallon bucket. Place the thawed turkey (with innards removed) breast side down in brine. If necessary, weigh down the bird to ensure it is fully immersed, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area for 8 to 16 hours, turning the bird once half way through brining.

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Remove the bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard the brine.

Place the bird on roasting rack inside a half sheet pan and pat dry with paper towels.

Combine the apple, onion, cinnamon stick, and 1 cup of water in a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 5 minutes. Add steeped aromatics to the turkey's cavity along with the rosemary and sage. Tuck the wings underneath the bird and coat the skin liberally with canola oil.

Roast the turkey on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F for 30 minutes. Insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Set the thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees F. A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting. Let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil or a large mixing bowl for 15 minutes before carving.

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