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Teaching Kids Healthy Habits Teaching Kids Healthy Habits

Should teachers be able to request that kid's put on deodorant?

Posted by on Jun. 26, 2012 at 5:51 AM
  • 4 Replies

Teacher Asks Kids to Wear Deodorant to School & Causes a Big Stink

Posted by Kiri Blakeley on June 25, 2012 

Should teachers be able to send home notes to parents that touch on the more "intimate" aspects of a child's growth? Such as, you know, putting a sports bra or some deodorant on a young kid? That's the question asked by a mother on the Mouthy Housewives blog on The Huffington Post. Laments the mom:

My daughter is 9-years-old! I am NOT going to give her a complex about her teeny tiny boobs or a little bit of sweat. I don't think it is the teacher's place AT ALL to bring up bras and deodorant. In my opinion, it is a parenting issue.

Woah, hold up, lady! Let's go over the facts here before you send your braless child to school to stink up the classroom.

Your 9-year-old darling is spending eight hours or longer with people who are NOT YOU. You see your daughter when she wakes up, right after a bath or shower, and when she gets home, which is probably right before she bathes or showers. You aren't gonna get the full blast of middle-of-the-day or after-recess underarm perfume like her teachers and other students are.

Sorry, but a 9-year-old is not too young to be introduced to the rituals of womanhood -- not today, when girls are hitting puberty younger and younger. If your daughter gets her period at school and her teacher writes a note asking you to make sure that she has pads, are you going to squawk and cry, "Not my 9-year-old!" Hello?

Nobody is saying to teach your kid to be ashamed of her body. I don't think a bra (if needed) or a swipe of deodorant is any more encouraging a child to be ashamed of her body than is a good scrubbing with a bar of soap or flossing or brushing of teeth. It's basic hygiene and body care.

Additionally, the teacher who sent the note home to the touchy mom was pregnant -- which is WHY she suggested deodorant for those who might need it. Because she doesn't want to puke in the classroom if she gets nausceous from your child's aroma (which I'm sure charms your nose, but probably not everyone's). She's there to teach your kids. Get it?

Must we make everything tiny request into a big stink, parents? If your kid would be traumatized by a little deodorant, then I have no idea how he or she is going to get through the real trials and tribulations of life. Phew!

Should teachers be able to request that kid's put on deodorant?

by on Jun. 26, 2012 at 5:51 AM
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Replies (1-4):
VisionSeeker
by on Jun. 26, 2012 at 7:23 AM

 They do it all the time where I work.  Kids can be cruel and from my experience, most of the teachers that come to me to talk to the kids are more concerned about peer pressure than anything else.

abra
by on Jun. 26, 2012 at 11:32 AM
this. The teachers are only put in that uncomfortable position when parents arent doing their job.

Quoting VisionSeeker:

 They do it all the time where I work.  Kids can be cruel and from my experience, most of the teachers that come to me to talk to the kids are more concerned about peer pressure than anything else.

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sarah824
by on Jun. 26, 2012 at 11:38 AM

I think a teacher is well within their rights to ask for a child to wear deaodorant.  

soccerchik8287
by on Jun. 27, 2012 at 11:39 PM

Ugh this is an issue I faced this past year. We had a 9th grade girl who just stunk. We had to keep the door open in the classroom & sit her by the door (she didn't know she was sitting their on purpose) to try to make it so the smell wasn't too bad. Even then if you got close to her it'd about make you puke. It was awful! We actually brought it up to a guidance counselor & an assistant principal, because no only was it making students (& us teachers) uncomfortable, it was making it so this girl did not have anyone who would talk to her or sit by her & be friendly. I'm sure the poor girl thought it was because no one liked her, but in truth it was because if you got too close you got sick. We were told though that there was nothing we could do. They said it was not the schools job to make sure students wore deodorant & showered it was the schools job to provide the kids with an education.

I just think it's really sad because it wouldn't take much to change that girls life for the better!

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