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SAT Reading Scores LOWEST in 40 years

http://news.yahoo.com/sat-reading-scores-lowest-theyve-40-years-204658542.html

Do you read to your kids? How often?

Do you think the scores are the result of migration to the US, two working parents, genetic/inability, technology/TV, apathetic attitude or another reason?

Granted, English is a tough language but other countries are teaching children native and English languages. So if other kids are learning more than one language, then why can't US kids make the grade??

by on Sep. 25, 2012 at 10:16 AM
Replies (11-20):
Kris_PBG
by on Sep. 27, 2012 at 6:30 AM
Quoting littleswampfox:

I'm mobile, or I would upload the video, but you (general) need to go to YouTube and watch "Why High School Students Don't Read What's Assigned In Class" by Penny Kittle. It has changed the way that our English department structures our classes. I have repeaters this semester, some who would have never touched a book last year, who are reading, avidly, because they've been given a choice--no strings attached. "Eyes on text" is one of the biggest things a language teacher can do. Not everybody is going to love and appreciate classics or even more modern class reading. But, every person can find at least ONE book that appeals to him/her. From there, it's a matter of steering, helping, and providing.



That is great.

"Eyes on text" and choice of text time is a big part of the reason the Daily 5 is becoming so popular in elementary schools.
seahorsebaby11
by on Sep. 27, 2012 at 12:46 PM


After reading this about 10 times, I realized this is NOT a joke.  Fascinating, really, because in many circles, NCLB is viewed as the worst thing that has happened to education and a whole decade/generation lost, as a result. In fact, one parent once told me it meant that they are all promoted to the next grade.

I am very sad about the state of education and give most of the credit to NCLB.  Provoking better qualified teachers in some really bad regions might have been a positive feature, but that's about it.

Quoting Kris_PBG:



 

Thank goodness we implemented NCLB - that worked SO well for our country's education plan.

 

My kids read or are read to probably 6/7 days a week...  (There is usually one night where they either fall asleep early or some activity that gets in our way.)


Kris_PBG
by on Sep. 27, 2012 at 8:07 PM
3 moms liked this

Oh no - I assure you - that is my dry sarcasm.

I think NCLB is the devil in disguise.

Quoting seahorsebaby11:


After reading this about 10 times, I realized this is NOT a joke.  Fascinating, really, because in many circles, NCLB is viewed as the worst thing that has happened to education and a whole decade/generation lost, as a result. In fact, one parent once told me it meant that they are all promoted to the next grade.

I am very sad about the state of education and give most of the credit to NCLB.  Provoking better qualified teachers in some really bad regions might have been a positive feature, but that's about it.

Quoting Kris_PBG:



 

Thank goodness we implemented NCLB - that worked SO well for our country's education plan.


My kids read or are read to probably 6/7 days a week...  (There is usually one night where they either fall asleep early or some activity that gets in our way.)



Bmat
by on Nov. 5, 2012 at 9:05 AM

I am sorry to hear this.  Yes I read to my children all the time.  Weekly trips to the library, books for gifts, and so forth.

Hannahsmommy816
by on Nov. 5, 2012 at 12:42 PM

 oh wow. i read to the kids every day if possible! idk about the reason for the scores, i'm sure there are a lot of reasons and factors

slw123
by on Nov. 5, 2012 at 1:00 PM
1 mom liked this

My kids read a lot.  I hate the reading tests my kids take.  They always ask questions like "What was the authors purpose?"  Then it will give a choice of 4 answers, two will be obviously wrong and two will look like possibilities.  To me, unless the answer is obvious to the person who actually read it.....the authors purpose is up for interpretation.  Did they actually ASK the author what their purpose was when they wrote a story? 

kirbymom
by on Nov. 5, 2012 at 1:34 PM


Quoting littleswampfox:

I'm mobile, or I would upload the video, but you (general) need to go to YouTube and watch "Why High School Students Don't Read What's Assigned In Class" by Penny Kittle. It has changed the way that our English department structures our classes.

I have repeaters this semester, some who would have never touched a book last year, who are reading, avidly, because they've been given a choice--no strings attached.

"Eyes on text" is one of the biggest things a language teacher can do. Not everybody is going to love and appreciate classics or even more modern class reading. But, every person can find at least ONE book that appeals to him/her. From there, it's a matter of steering, helping, and providing.

I so agree with you here.  

lifesadream83
by on Nov. 5, 2012 at 6:05 PM


One of the reason's I decided to homeschool was due to the school district we lived in.  The reason I will continue to homeschool is because of the state of the education system in general and how well homeschooling is working for our family.  (Mind you I am getting my certification in K-8 as well just so I can feel secure in what I am doing with my own child.)  I have to say I have learned more from actually schooling my child then taking these classes.  

 

Looking back all the way to elementary school I cannot remember being made to read books, not the classics, nothing so I am now enjoying most of them for the first time!  I have to scour web pages and reviews to ensure that books my daughter are reading are not only reading level appropriate but also age appropriate now that her reading level has well surpassed her grade level.  The curriculums I am using now with my daughter for most of her subjects are literature based.  Not to mention we do a read aloud everyday and she reads me her independent reader so that I know she is not struggling.  We address difficult vocabulary and pronunciation on the spot.  


One of the main problems I think schools face is that they cater to the demand for technology.  Kids want things at internet or visual speed.  So they don't want to read a book that may take a few days to get through when they can watch a movie.  


Personally, not a huge fan of NCLB.  IMO Education is poorly run in America and we could stand to look elsewhere for a better example.  NC requires your child to take a standardized test every year.  Last year we did the CAT.  I was extremely suprised to see how low the expectation of knowledge was for a 2nd grader.  



batjmom
by on Nov. 6, 2012 at 9:00 AM
Reading has always been an important part of the day. I read to the boys a lot when they were younger. Our entire family reads before bed. We talk about books
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bellabeanxox
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 12:11 AM

I am so sad to hear when kids say that they hate to read. It breaks my heart. My daughter is a bookworm, and I couldn't be happier that she's a reader. Even still, we've had to work on her vocab more than I would've expected.

There was actually an interesting study I read the other day on how focusing on vocabulary when your children are young will help them to become better readers, which will in turn help them to do better on the SAT later in life. I don't know enough about our elementary school system anymore, but I wonder if they do not focus enough on vocabulary during reading? I always wondered if there was a cut off age, or if we can learn these necessary things even as we get older (and whether it will be enough to help).

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