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Common Core State Standards - has your state/district adopted?

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Our state has adopted the new common core state standards. Based on everything I have seen it is a better way to measure success in school! 

Has your school adopted/have they talked about it with parents/what are your thougths....

by on Nov. 7, 2012 at 6:07 PM
Replies (21-30):
ScarletRose4488
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:42 PM

So maybe you should be yelling at your state instead of me.   I am not going to be sorry that we have the resources where I live.  I pay a hell of a lot in taxes for them.  Your problem is with your school district. 

Clearly you know nothing about the program, have no intreast in learning anything about the program, and didn't bother to look at any of the links for FREE resources that I put on my comment.  So I am not going to waste any more time on this.   You can be as angry as you want.   The world is not going to sit around and wait for you to be happy.

Good luck


Quoting SusanTheWriter:

What resources? We haven't gotten any new resources. The state hasn't even fully funded our district for the last four years - they sure aren't going to start just because we got Common Core. If there are new resources necessary to teach CC, we'll have to see how many staff and faculty jobs have to go in order to finance it. I already live in one of the most highly taxed states in the nation. The school board has slashed everything to the bone in order to avoid raising property taxes, but if new tools are needed, they won't have a choice but to put a bigger burden on an already burdened community.

My kids do score over 90% on previous standardized tests. As I said, I don't worry about them individually. But I think you misunderstood my point.

Schools that don't score well are punished. Funding (which we aren't getting now, even as a fairly high-ranking district) will drop. More regulations will be enacted in order to meet the new standards.

The time factor DOES matter because 1) the new curriculum for the new standards is not in place. 2) If new tools/resources are necessary for the new standards, we don't have them. Teaching to the test - for math or LA or any other subject - hasn't happened because the infrastructure was not in place. That's like telling a community that what used to be a gravel lane needs to be turned into an airport, not providing any funding or necessary tools, and, oh by the way, we'll be landing the first planes there in 9 weeks. Good luck!

I think that poor planning, zero funding, and the state dept of education and the NEA's blind following of whatever trend blows their way is cause for concern.

My kids have been in Everyday Math since the beginning. I have seen firsthand the utter failure of that as a program. My dd got As in math every year. When she hit Pre-Algebra, she was failing. EM did NOTHING to prepare her for higher level maths. They didn't even require that multiplication tables be learned! She spent all her time in Pre-Alg doing simple problems in the most complicated way possible and didn't have time to absorb the concepts. The teacher spent most of the first semester teaching an entire Honors Pre-Algebra class of students how to multiply and divide because the entire generation of students had never learned it.

If I never see another of those stupid lattices, it will be too soon. I forbade my son from doing them, and wrote a note to his math teacher letting him know that my kid was actually going to learn math - not number art.

Everday Math has been disputed by mathematicians who are Nobel Prize winners and Fields prize winners. You can read their objections here.

I may not be a teacher by profession, but that doesn't mean I blindly follow what "educational experts" say. They can be as wrong as anyone else. The timing, the implementation, and some of the subject matter (they're totally on the EM bandwagon) are badly executed.

Quoting ScarletRose4488:

I do have a very favorable view of Common Core because having the resources available has made a huge improvement in my life.  My daughter is hearing impaired.  Having the ability to have extra help, examples, demonstrations, ect at home is huge for her.  It has been good for her math but just as important it has been good for her self-esteem.  It has given her more independance in learning which in turn give her more confidence. 

It is a shame that you just got the standards at your school.   But you are being a bit dramatic.   How would more resources and better tools hurt your kids?   Regardless of whether your school did anything with Common Core your children would be tested in math.   Common Core does not change the fact that all our children are tested and compared.  The fact is that when our children go to college they all take the same tests.   If children in school "A" are taught at a different level than children at school "B" no one is going to say it's ok because school A didn't have enough time.  

Math is the one subject where the kids do need to be taught to the test.   There is no wiggle room in math.  You either know how to do a math problem correctly or you do not.   Every year our kids are tested and if you look at those tests they have a state ranking and a national ranking.   How is it not of benefit for you to have the standards that other schools, other states, and other countries hold?   I am curious if you know where your children fall in national ranking.   If they are up in the 90th percent then your children already know Common Core it just wasn't called Common Core.   If your children are below that then be grateful you now have a better shot of getting them caught up. 

Perhaps your teacher, school, or district is going about Common Core badly.   Have you looked into Common Core at all?  You mentioned the teachers, administrators, & school board all being "drop-kicked" but everyone in education should know exactly where their kids and their curriculum is ranking.   None of this sould be a surprise to any of them.  As for the consequenses that is a very good question.   Will you hold your school responsible if they are doing a bad job?  I would imagine the consequenses might be wide-ranging.  This goes back to a much bigger problem of why it is we allow failing teachers to continue teaching.  Now I will admit that I am not a teacher for a very good reason.  I would not have the patience for it.  So I give teachers a whole lot of respect.  It is hard work, it is under-paid, and they deal with a whole lot of red-tape stupidity.  Having said that it is not good enough to sit back and let the status-quo continue.   I don't want a failing teacher to teach my kids.  I grew up in a bad school in a bad neighborhood with teachers that just didn't care.   I had teachers who did not show up for class.  Almost everyone (including me) in my freshman math class failed because the teacher didn't bother to teach anything.  I know of 5 instances where teachers at my school were arrested.  Not just fired for inappropriate conduct but arrested.  Which is why I fought tooth & nail to find a way to move into a very good school district.  Guess what?  My 5th grader can do things in math I didn't see until college. 

But I have gotten side-tracked.   The bottom line is as a parent I want to have resources available to help my children, me as a parent, and the teachers.   That is a GOOD thing. 

There are soooo many resources that have been created with this.  Many of those resources are online and even include online lesson reviews, videos, animated problem-solving examples, and parent tips.   I will put some of them below in case you would like to look.   These are the sites that I think you can gain access without school passwords.  (Most require the passwords).  

Learnzillion.com

http://everydaymath.uchicago.edu/parents/

https://www.khanacademy.org

https://www.xtramath.org/





Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I certainly don't. They were dropped on our schools in late November. No big deal until we foundyesterday that we have to test with them in late February. If the idea is to bring the curriculum up to snuff, then this is an epic fail.
My kids always test well, so I'm not concerned about them individually, but the parents, the school board, the administrators, and the teachers all got drop-kicked. No discussion, no recourse. That feels a lot more like government standardization and not the Gates Foundation to me.
We complain when teachers teach to the test, but what will the consequences be when they don't have time to do that this year?


Quoting Kris_PBG:

Many do not hold such high opinions of the common core.








Quoting ScarletRose4488:

Yes and then some.  It is a great program that makes huge improvements to struggling teachers and schools.  The reason that Common Core is so much better is because in the past it has always been government giving our most standards.   The whole Common Core concept was started by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation not the government.   This was a very well researched and constructed program.  Most important they have put out a ton of tools, tips, and resources directly for the teachers & schools.   It is not just "you have to do this" but it is "this is what we should do, why we should do it, and how you can make it happen".







Jen
~ I speak from the heart because the truth is always the best - even if you don't know it yet. ~
SusanTheWriter
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 8:25 AM
2 moms liked this
I'm not especially angry at you, just pointing out that when the educational establishment says "Woohoo!" I don't start dancing.

I've seen and used all your links before. Not sure there was any new information there. Are you saying that the awesome new resource for CC math is Khan Academy? We've been using that in our house for years because it's a good resource, not because of any standards.

Did you read the link I provided about Everyday Math?

I guess I was upset that you assume this is going to be such an amazing thing for everyone and we should all just sit back and be happy. Maybe this is the best thing for your child. I hope so. It's honestly unlikely to change things much for my children.

I simply urge folks to look carefully before jumping onto any bandwagon.


Quoting ScarletRose4488:

So maybe you should be yelling at your state instead of me.   I am not going to be sorry that we have the resources where I live.  I pay a hell of a lot in taxes for them.  Your problem is with your school district. 

Clearly you know nothing about the program, have no intreast in learning anything about the program, and didn't bother to look at any of the links for FREE resources that I put on my comment.  So I am not going to waste any more time on this.   You can be as angry as you want.   The world is not going to sit around and wait for you to be happy.

Good luck



Quoting SusanTheWriter:

What resources? We haven't gotten any new resources. The state hasn't even fully funded our district for the last four years - they sure aren't going to start just because we got Common Core. If there are new resources necessary to teach CC, we'll have to see how many staff and faculty jobs have to go in order to finance it. I already live in one of the most highly taxed states in the nation. The school board has slashed everything to the bone in order to avoid raising property taxes, but if new tools are needed, they won't have a choice but to put a bigger burden on an already burdened community.

My kids do score over 90% on previous standardized tests. As I said, I don't worry about them individually. But I think you misunderstood my point.

Schools that don't score well are punished. Funding (which we aren't getting now, even as a fairly high-ranking district) will drop. More regulations will be enacted in order to meet the new standards.

The time factor DOES matter because 1) the new curriculum for the new standards is not in place. 2) If new tools/resources are necessary for the new standards, we don't have them. Teaching to the test - for math or LA or any other subject - hasn't happened because the infrastructure was not in place. That's like telling a community that what used to be a gravel lane needs to be turned into an airport, not providing any funding or necessary tools, and, oh by the way, we'll be landing the first planes there in 9 weeks. Good luck!

I think that poor planning, zero funding, and the state dept of education and the NEA's blind following of whatever trend blows their way is cause for concern.

My kids have been in Everyday Math since the beginning. I have seen firsthand the utter failure of that as a program. My dd got As in math every year. When she hit Pre-Algebra, she was failing. EM did NOTHING to prepare her for higher level maths. They didn't even require that multiplication tables be learned! She spent all her time in Pre-Alg doing simple problems in the most complicated way possible and didn't have time to absorb the concepts. The teacher spent most of the first semester teaching an entire Honors Pre-Algebra class of students how to multiply and divide because the entire generation of students had never learned it.

If I never see another of those stupid lattices, it will be too soon. I forbade my son from doing them, and wrote a note to his math teacher letting him know that my kid was actually going to learn math - not number art.

Everday Math has been disputed by mathematicians who are Nobel Prize winners and Fields prize winners. You can read their objections here.

I may not be a teacher by profession, but that doesn't mean I blindly follow what "educational experts" say. They can be as wrong as anyone else. The timing, the implementation, and some of the subject matter (they're totally on the EM bandwagon) are badly executed.

Quoting ScarletRose4488:

I do have a very favorable view of Common Core because having the resources available has made a huge improvement in my life.  My daughter is hearing impaired.  Having the ability to have extra help, examples, demonstrations, ect at home is huge for her.  It has been good for her math but just as important it has been good for her self-esteem.  It has given her more independance in learning which in turn give her more confidence. 

It is a shame that you just got the standards at your school.   But you are being a bit dramatic.   How would more resources and better tools hurt your kids?   Regardless of whether your school did anything with Common Core your children would be tested in math.   Common Core does not change the fact that all our children are tested and compared.  The fact is that when our children go to college they all take the same tests.   If children in school "A" are taught at a different level than children at school "B" no one is going to say it's ok because school A didn't have enough time.  

Math is the one subject where the kids do need to be taught to the test.   There is no wiggle room in math.  You either know how to do a math problem correctly or you do not.   Every year our kids are tested and if you look at those tests they have a state ranking and a national ranking.   How is it not of benefit for you to have the standards that other schools, other states, and other countries hold?   I am curious if you know where your children fall in national ranking.   If they are up in the 90th percent then your children already know Common Core it just wasn't called Common Core.   If your children are below that then be grateful you now have a better shot of getting them caught up. 

Perhaps your teacher, school, or district is going about Common Core badly.   Have you looked into Common Core at all?  You mentioned the teachers, administrators, & school board all being "drop-kicked" but everyone in education should know exactly where their kids and their curriculum is ranking.   None of this sould be a surprise to any of them.  As for the consequenses that is a very good question.   Will you hold your school responsible if they are doing a bad job?  I would imagine the consequenses might be wide-ranging.  This goes back to a much bigger problem of why it is we allow failing teachers to continue teaching.  Now I will admit that I am not a teacher for a very good reason.  I would not have the patience for it.  So I give teachers a whole lot of respect.  It is hard work, it is under-paid, and they deal with a whole lot of red-tape stupidity.  Having said that it is not good enough to sit back and let the status-quo continue.   I don't want a failing teacher to teach my kids.  I grew up in a bad school in a bad neighborhood with teachers that just didn't care.   I had teachers who did not show up for class.  Almost everyone (including me) in my freshman math class failed because the teacher didn't bother to teach anything.  I know of 5 instances where teachers at my school were arrested.  Not just fired for inappropriate conduct but arrested.  Which is why I fought tooth & nail to find a way to move into a very good school district.  Guess what?  My 5th grader can do things in math I didn't see until college. 

But I have gotten side-tracked.   The bottom line is as a parent I want to have resources available to help my children, me as a parent, and the teachers.   That is a GOOD thing. 

There are soooo many resources that have been created with this.  Many of those resources are online and even include online lesson reviews, videos, animated problem-solving examples, and parent tips.   I will put some of them below in case you would like to look.   These are the sites that I think you can gain access without school passwords.  (Most require the passwords).  

Learnzillion.com

http://everydaymath.uchicago.edu/parents/

https://www.khanacademy.org

https://www.xtramath.org/





Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I certainly don't. They were dropped on our schools in late November. No big deal until we foundyesterday that we have to test with them in late February. If the idea is to bring the curriculum up to snuff, then this is an epic fail.

My kids always test well, so I'm not concerned about them individually, but the parents, the school board, the administrators, and the teachers all got drop-kicked. No discussion, no recourse. That feels a lot more like government standardization and not the Gates Foundation to me.

We complain when teachers teach to the test, but what will the consequences be when they don't have time to do that this year?




Quoting Kris_PBG:

Many do not hold such high opinions of the common core.













Quoting ScarletRose4488:

Yes and then some.  It is a great program that makes huge improvements to struggling teachers and schools.  The reason that Common Core is so much better is because in the past it has always been government giving our most standards.   The whole Common Core concept was started by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation not the government.   This was a very well researched and constructed program.  Most important they have put out a ton of tools, tips, and resources directly for the teachers & schools.   It is not just "you have to do this" but it is "this is what we should do, why we should do it, and how you can make it happen".










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SlightlyPerfect
Report
5 nominations, and my answer is still no.
Yesterday at 9:03 AM
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 8:37 PM

Yes. PA is not an open-territory state.

slightlyperfect

MansfieldMama
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:23 AM

No, Texas has not adopted CC standards.  Our education system in Texas is a mess.  I don't know if CC is what we need, but what we're doing is not working.  I teach AP English, and I am very frustrated with the decline of our education system over the past 20 years; I've been teaching almost that long.

magsrobsmom
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 8:14 PM

 

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

What resources? We haven't gotten any new resources. The state hasn't even fully funded our district for the last four years - they sure aren't going to start just because we got Common Core. If there are new resources necessary to teach CC, we'll have to see how many staff and faculty jobs have to go in order to finance it. I already live in one of the most highly taxed states in the nation. The school board has slashed everything to the bone in order to avoid raising property taxes, but if new tools are needed, they won't have a choice but to put a bigger burden on an already burdened community.

My kids do score over 90% on previous standardized tests. As I said, I don't worry about them individually. But I think you misunderstood my point.

Schools that don't score well are punished. Funding (which we aren't getting now, even as a fairly high-ranking district) will drop. More regulations will be enacted in order to meet the new standards.

The time factor DOES matter because 1) the new curriculum for the new standards is not in place. 2) If new tools/resources are necessary for the new standards, we don't have them. Teaching to the test - for math or LA or any other subject - hasn't happened because the infrastructure was not in place. That's like telling a community that what used to be a gravel lane needs to be turned into an airport, not providing any funding or necessary tools, and, oh by the way, we'll be landing the first planes there in 9 weeks. Good luck!

I think that poor planning, zero funding, and the state dept of education and the NEA's blind following of whatever trend blows their way is cause for concern.

My kids have been in Everyday Math since the beginning. I have seen firsthand the utter failure of that as a program. My dd got As in math every year. When she hit Pre-Algebra, she was failing. EM did NOTHING to prepare her for higher level maths. They didn't even require that multiplication tables be learned! She spent all her time in Pre-Alg doing simple problems in the most complicated way possible and didn't have time to absorb the concepts. The teacher spent most of the first semester teaching an entire Honors Pre-Algebra class of students how to multiply and divide because the entire generation of students had never learned it.

If I never see another of those stupid lattices, it will be too soon. I forbade my son from doing them, and wrote a note to his math teacher letting him know that my kid was actually going to learn math - not number art.

Everday Math has been disputed by mathematicians who are Nobel Prize winners and Fields prize winners. You can read their objections here.

I may not be a teacher by profession, but that doesn't mean I blindly follow what "educational experts" say. They can be as wrong as anyone else. The timing, the implementation, and some of the subject matter (they're totally on the EM bandwagon) are badly executed.


 Are you in Oregon, because this sounds exactly like what I'm experiencing with my 3rd grader and 8th grader! It is sooo frustrating! I also told my older child's teacher something similar about the lattice program when she was in elementary school and now we'll have to face it again with my 3rd grader. And, my 8th grader is also going through the exact same scenerio you mentioned about constant 'A's in math until pre-Algebra; now she's struggling. The high school my 8th grader is supposed to attend in the fall is completely revamping their program because their "small schools" program (backed by the Gates Foundation) failed miserably and now they are scrambling to put together a new program by September. Needless to say, after a meeting at the middle school last night, many parents are looking at other schools in the area.

Kris_PBG
by on Feb. 10, 2013 at 9:28 AM
1 mom liked this
The Gates Foundation makes me ill.

:(


Quoting magsrobsmom:

 


Quoting SusanTheWriter:


What resources? We haven't gotten any new resources. The state hasn't even fully funded our district for the last four years - they sure aren't going to start just because we got Common Core. If there are new resources necessary to teach CC, we'll have to see how many staff and faculty jobs have to go in order to finance it. I already live in one of the most highly taxed states in the nation. The school board has slashed everything to the bone in order to avoid raising property taxes, but if new tools are needed, they won't have a choice but to put a bigger burden on an already burdened community.


My kids do score over 90% on previous standardized tests. As I said, I don't worry about them individually. But I think you misunderstood my point.


Schools that don't score well are punished. Funding (which we aren't getting now, even as a fairly high-ranking district) will drop. More regulations will be enacted in order to meet the new standards.


The time factor DOES matter because 1) the new curriculum for the new standards is not in place. 2) If new tools/resources are necessary for the new standards, we don't have them. Teaching to the test - for math or LA or any other subject - hasn't happened because the infrastructure was not in place. That's like telling a community that what used to be a gravel lane needs to be turned into an airport, not providing any funding or necessary tools, and, oh by the way, we'll be landing the first planes there in 9 weeks. Good luck!


I think that poor planning, zero funding, and the state dept of education and the NEA's blind following of whatever trend blows their way is cause for concern.


My kids have been in Everyday Math since the beginning. I have seen firsthand the utter failure of that as a program. My dd got As in math every year. When she hit Pre-Algebra, she was failing. EM did NOTHING to prepare her for higher level maths. They didn't even require that multiplication tables be learned! She spent all her time in Pre-Alg doing simple problems in the most complicated way possible and didn't have time to absorb the concepts. The teacher spent most of the first semester teaching an entire Honors Pre-Algebra class of students how to multiply and divide because the entire generation of students had never learned it.


If I never see another of those stupid lattices, it will be too soon. I forbade my son from doing them, and wrote a note to his math teacher letting him know that my kid was actually going to learn math - not number art.


Everday Math has been disputed by mathematicians who are Nobel Prize winners and Fields prize winners. You can read their objections here.


I may not be a teacher by profession, but that doesn't mean I blindly follow what "educational experts" say. They can be as wrong as anyone else. The timing, the implementation, and some of the subject matter (they're totally on the EM bandwagon) are badly executed.




 Are you in Oregon, because this sounds exactly like what I'm experiencing with my 3rd grader and 8th grader! It is sooo frustrating! I also told my older child's teacher something similar about the lattice program when she was in elementary school and now we'll have to face it again with my 3rd grader. And, my 8th grader is also going through the exact same scenerio you mentioned about constant 'A's in math until pre-Algebra; now she's struggling. The high school my 8th grader is supposed to attend in the fall is completely revamping their program because their "small schools" program (backed by the Gates Foundation) failed miserably and now they are scrambling to put together a new program by September. Needless to say, after a meeting at the middle school last night, many parents are looking at other schools in the area.


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AutymsMommy
by on Mar. 18, 2013 at 11:09 PM

I believe our state has adopted them, yes. I believe our district will implement them fully by next year (don't quote me on that, lol).

I'm not personally adopting them at home though and most of the homeschool curricula publishers I currently use aren't aligning to the Common Core Standards either (although others are). Thank God.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 19, 2013 at 12:16 AM
Vey curious - what standards do homeschoolers follow? (And you know me well enough to know that is a serious question - not a cheeky/nasty one!). Lol!


Quoting AutymsMommy:

I believe our state has adopted them, yes. I believe our district will implement them fully by next year (don't quote me on that, lol).

I'm not personally adopting them at home though and most of the homeschool curricula publishers I currently use aren't aligning to the Common Core Standards either (although others are). Thank God.


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
AutymsMommy
by on Mar. 19, 2013 at 12:39 AM

Our state doesn't require homeschoolers to participate in standardized testing, like some states do require, so we do not follow any one set of standards.

I half jokingly/half seriously call our standards "The Mastery Standard" - I have the luxury to work on age appropriate, developmentally appropriate material until mastery, never needing to take into consideration what *he* is doing or *she* is doing, or what *they* say we should be doing.

Most homeschool curricula is written by experts in that field (so, a linguist may write a history of the english language text, a mathematician may write the math curriculum we purchase, a working scientist works with a child's author to write a science curriculum, etc).

Because there are no "standard" for homeschoolers to follow, many of us have to look hard and long at curriculum before buying it - I tend to steer clear of programs written by other homeschool parents, who have no expert experience in that field (but sometimes that information isn't clear at first).

I'm rambling. Lol. I enjoy that we have no federal standards, but it can get difficult to sort through; many of us do look to see that we are at least meeting local school standards, just *in case* our children ever go back to school (in my case, I keep an eye on our local Catholic schools standards - not bound to Common Core).

ETA: We do actually have a state standard we have to meet, but I've never thought about it until you asked because it just seemed like common sense to me that most parents would *do it*, lol. We are required to teach certain subjects - math, science, history or social studies, language arts (including literature and comp in grades 7 and up).


Quoting Kris_PBG:

Vey curious - what standards do homeschoolers follow? (And you know me well enough to know that is a serious question - not a cheeky/nasty one!). Lol!


Quoting AutymsMommy:

I believe our state has adopted them, yes. I believe our district will implement them fully by next year (don't quote me on that, lol).

I'm not personally adopting them at home though and most of the homeschool curricula publishers I currently use aren't aligning to the Common Core Standards either (although others are). Thank God.




I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














SusanTheWriter
by on Mar. 20, 2013 at 10:13 AM

I'm homeschooling my 10th grader, and our state has no standardized testing and only requires that we teach the main subjects. Since she is preparing to return to high school next year, I've made sure that the materials we're using are preparing her to do well in honors level classes. She took the PSAT this year and is preparing for the SAT/ACT next year. All standard high school stuff. :)

Also, my 6th grader who attends public school took his ISATs a couple of weeks ago - the new Common Core aligned state tests that were sprung on them without prep. He said they were pretty easy. :) Because it takes the state almost a full year to grade the tests, I won't find out his scores for some time, but I'm not too worried about him. I do still worry about the overall scores from the school. I hate that the scores of other children influence how my kids are taught. But until we can come to a universal agreement that each child is an individual and requires an individualized method of instruction, it is what it is.

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