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Moms for Education Moms for Education

I believe that teachers who don't have patient for children with a disability shouldn't be teaching those type of children.

 

by on Nov. 11, 2012 at 1:27 PM
Replies (21-30):
MissyB1011
by Missy on Feb. 13, 2013 at 2:15 PM
My aunt let her certificate in special education lapse because she was burning out. She asked to be moved out for a couple of years to regroup. They didn't do it until they needed her in a class where they were trying to mainstream a couple of kids who weren't quite ready yet. She actually considered quitting teaching after that year. She now teaches 3rd grade and loves it.

Quoting mamavalor:

So true.  But sadly, many teachers, experienced or not, don't want to teach disabled students.  Too much work.  There is a high burn out rate for special education teachers too.

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mamavalor
by on Feb. 13, 2013 at 3:42 PM
1 mom liked this

Happy to hear that your aunt stayed in education and found happiness in teaching 3rd grade.  

If parents think parenting special needs children is difficult, just think about educating a bunch (at the same time) with bureaucracy and parents breathing down your neck. 


Quoting MissyB1011:

My aunt let her certificate in special education lapse because she was burning out. She asked to be moved out for a couple of years to regroup. They didn't do it until they needed her in a class where they were trying to mainstream a couple of kids who weren't quite ready yet. She actually considered quitting teaching after that year. She now teaches 3rd grade and loves it.

Quoting mamavalor:

So true.  But sadly, many teachers, experienced or not, don't want to teach disabled students.  Too much work.  There is a high burn out rate for special education teachers too.


 

mjande4
by Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:08 AM
1 mom liked this

This might be the most ridiculous thing I have read on this site this week and that's saying A LOT!  NO TEACHER gets into education for the lack of money.  LMAO


Quoting sally310:

I have a special ed daughter and has a horrific experience with the ps in our district.  We finally just go out and moved.  I saw a few dedicated special ed teachers, but most were just in it for the money.  Really they were making 80k for working half a year.  Did not have to show any results, insulted my child at every meeting, and could never get fired.  Sorry, but they are not having such a tough time.

On the other hand my daughter was learning nothing, except how to misbehave.  I now have to pay to send  her to private school, or home school.  I know that the teachers in our district had no training, but there was nothing to stop them doing a little research in their own time.  There is so much information out there, I find useful new stuff practically every day.  They could devote a little of their time to that, or ask the district to provide them with training.  As a parent it is beyond frustrating to see these people with no clue, when all they need to know is out there, they just can't be bothered to look.  I even took in information for them, but they refused to look at it.  I appealed to them to consult with experts, they just didn't want to know.  What ever happened to going the extra mile for your students?



MissyB1011
by Missy on Feb. 15, 2013 at 7:41 PM
I started taking elementary/special ed in college. I just didn't think I could handle it. There is a lot of reaponsibility!

Quoting mamavalor:

Happy to hear that your aunt stayed in education and found happiness in teaching 3rd grade.  


If parents think parenting special needs children is difficult, just think about educating a bunch (at the same time) with bureaucracy and parents breathing down your neck. 




Quoting MissyB1011:

My aunt let her certificate in special education lapse because she was burning out. She asked to be moved out for a couple of years to regroup. They didn't do it until they needed her in a class where they were trying to mainstream a couple of kids who weren't quite ready yet. She actually considered quitting teaching after that year. She now teaches 3rd grade and loves it.


Quoting mamavalor:


So true.  But sadly, many teachers, experienced or not, don't want to teach disabled students.  Too much work.  There is a high burn out rate for special education teachers too.




 

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maxswolfsuit
by on Feb. 16, 2013 at 12:00 PM
1 mom liked this

Plus, it's not like you get more money for teaching ESE kids. Harder job, same pay...  but they're in it for the money?

Quoting mjande4:

This might be the most ridiculous thing I have read on this site this week and that's saying A LOT!  NO TEACHER gets into education for the lack of money.  LMAO


Quoting sally310:

I have a special ed daughter and has a horrific experience with the ps in our district.  We finally just go out and moved.  I saw a few dedicated special ed teachers, but most were just in it for the money.  Really they were making 80k for working half a year.  Did not have to show any results, insulted my child at every meeting, and could never get fired.  Sorry, but they are not having such a tough time.

On the other hand my daughter was learning nothing, except how to misbehave.  I now have to pay to send  her to private school, or home school.  I know that the teachers in our district had no training, but there was nothing to stop them doing a little research in their own time.  There is so much information out there, I find useful new stuff practically every day.  They could devote a little of their time to that, or ask the district to provide them with training.  As a parent it is beyond frustrating to see these people with no clue, when all they need to know is out there, they just can't be bothered to look.  I even took in information for them, but they refused to look at it.  I appealed to them to consult with experts, they just didn't want to know.  What ever happened to going the extra mile for your students?




mamavalor
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:22 AM

 

It's the district's fault for hiring such teachers.  It's also the district's responsibility to make sure teachers are kept up-to-date with their field of expertise.  That's why teachers' in-service days are build into the schedule.  I don't know your situation so I can't explain why those teachers treated your daughter in that fashion.  I do know that teachers hate parents coming in feeling entitled and their child can do no wrong. 

If you feel your daughter has been mistreated, complaining to the principal and to the superintedent would be the next best thing.

Quoting sally310:

I have a special ed daughter and has a horrific experience with the ps in our district.  We finally just go out and moved.  I saw a few dedicated special ed teachers, but most were just in it for the money.  Really they were making 80k for working half a year.  Did not have to show any results, insulted my child at every meeting, and could never get fired.  Sorry, but they are not having such a tough time.

On the other hand my daughter was learning nothing, except how to misbehave.  I now have to pay to send  her to private school, or home school.  I know that the teachers in our district had no training, but there was nothing to stop them doing a little research in their own time.  There is so much information out there, I find useful new stuff practically every day.  They could devote a little of their time to that, or ask the district to provide them with training.  As a parent it is beyond frustrating to see these people with no clue, when all they need to know is out there, they just can't be bothered to look.  I even took in information for them, but they refused to look at it.  I appealed to them to consult with experts, they just didn't want to know.  What ever happened to going the extra mile for your students?


 

mamavalor
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:45 AM

 It's a lot of work but for some people this line of work comes more natural.  What did you end up majoring/doing?

DD2 has a 4th grade teacher who parents either love or hate.  He's a very enthusiastic, fun-loving, down-to-earth kind of teacher.  He makes everything fun and exciting.  It's great for DD2 because she's more on the serious/intense side.  Other parents don't like this teacher because they prefer a teacher who is more serious and...I guess get them ready for college...ivy league perhaps.  Who knows.  Too bad parents don't seem to realize that they have the power to sour a year for a kid too.

 

 

Quoting MissyB1011:

I started taking elementary/special ed in college. I just didn't think I could handle it. There is a lot of reaponsibility!

Quoting mamavalor:

Happy to hear that your aunt stayed in education and found happiness in teaching 3rd grade.  


If parents think parenting special needs children is difficult, just think about educating a bunch (at the same time) with bureaucracy and parents breathing down your neck. 


 


Quoting MissyB1011:

My aunt let her certificate in special education lapse because she was burning out. She asked to be moved out for a couple of years to regroup. They didn't do it until they needed her in a class where they were trying to mainstream a couple of kids who weren't quite ready yet. She actually considered quitting teaching after that year. She now teaches 3rd grade and loves it.


Quoting mamavalor:


So true.  But sadly, many teachers, experienced or not, don't want to teach disabled students.  Too much work.  There is a high burn out rate for special education teachers too.


 


 


 

mamavalor
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:49 AM

No, we certainly don't get more money.  Heck, we barely get any recognition at all in the school. We aren't popular like the male gym teacher or the G/T teacher.  Most students and parents ignore you, knowing there is a stigma associated with special education. 


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Plus, it's not like you get more money for teaching ESE kids. Harder job, same pay...  but they're in it for the money?

Quoting mjande4:

This might be the most ridiculous thing I have read on this site this week and that's saying A LOT!  NO TEACHER gets into education for the lack of money.  LMAO

 

Quoting sally310:

I have a special ed daughter and has a horrific experience with the ps in our district.  We finally just go out and moved.  I saw a few dedicated special ed teachers, but most were just in it for the money.  Really they were making 80k for working half a year.  Did not have to show any results, insulted my child at every meeting, and could never get fired.  Sorry, but they are not having such a tough time.

On the other hand my daughter was learning nothing, except how to misbehave.  I now have to pay to send  her to private school, or home school.  I know that the teachers in our district had no training, but there was nothing to stop them doing a little research in their own time.  There is so much information out there, I find useful new stuff practically every day.  They could devote a little of their time to that, or ask the district to provide them with training.  As a parent it is beyond frustrating to see these people with no clue, when all they need to know is out there, they just can't be bothered to look.  I even took in information for them, but they refused to look at it.  I appealed to them to consult with experts, they just didn't want to know.  What ever happened to going the extra mile for your students?

 

 



 

maxswolfsuit
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:37 PM

I'm so sorry to hear that. 

Our school does so much inclusion the ESE teachers and students are involved in everything. 

Quoting mamavalor:

No, we certainly don't get more money.  Heck, we barely get any recognition at all in the school. We aren't popular like the male gym teacher or the G/T teacher.  Most students and parents ignore you, knowing there is a stigma associated with special education. 


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Plus, it's not like you get more money for teaching ESE kids. Harder job, same pay...  but they're in it for the money?

Quoting mjande4:

This might be the most ridiculous thing I have read on this site this week and that's saying A LOT!  NO TEACHER gets into education for the lack of money.  LMAO


Quoting sally310:

I have a special ed daughter and has a horrific experience with the ps in our district.  We finally just go out and moved.  I saw a few dedicated special ed teachers, but most were just in it for the money.  Really they were making 80k for working half a year.  Did not have to show any results, insulted my child at every meeting, and could never get fired.  Sorry, but they are not having such a tough time.

On the other hand my daughter was learning nothing, except how to misbehave.  I now have to pay to send  her to private school, or home school.  I know that the teachers in our district had no training, but there was nothing to stop them doing a little research in their own time.  There is so much information out there, I find useful new stuff practically every day.  They could devote a little of their time to that, or ask the district to provide them with training.  As a parent it is beyond frustrating to see these people with no clue, when all they need to know is out there, they just can't be bothered to look.  I even took in information for them, but they refused to look at it.  I appealed to them to consult with experts, they just didn't want to know.  What ever happened to going the extra mile for your students?







MissyB1011
by Missy on Feb. 19, 2013 at 7:10 PM
I switched to business admin with the intention of going into accounting. After a layoff, I ended up in kitchen design and loved it. I worked for 2 different companies doing design. Now I am mostly a SAHM but work 2 days a week at an in-home daycare.

Quoting mamavalor:

 It's a lot of work but for some people this line of work comes more natural.  What did you end up majoring/doing?


DD2 has a 4th grade teacher who parents either love or hate.  He's a very enthusiastic, fun-loving, down-to-earth kind of teacher.  He makes everything fun and exciting.  It's great for DD2 because she's more on the serious/intense side.  Other parents don't like this teacher because they prefer a teacher who is more serious and...I guess get them ready for college...ivy league perhaps.  Who knows.  Too bad parents don't seem to realize that they have the power to sour a year for a kid too.


 


 


Quoting MissyB1011:

I started taking elementary/special ed in college. I just didn't think I could handle it. There is a lot of reaponsibility!



Quoting mamavalor:


Happy to hear that your aunt stayed in education and found happiness in teaching 3rd grade.  



If parents think parenting special needs children is difficult, just think about educating a bunch (at the same time) with bureaucracy and parents breathing down your neck. 



 



Quoting MissyB1011:

My aunt let her certificate in special education lapse because she was burning out. She asked to be moved out for a couple of years to regroup. They didn't do it until they needed her in a class where they were trying to mainstream a couple of kids who weren't quite ready yet. She actually considered quitting teaching after that year. She now teaches 3rd grade and loves it.



Quoting mamavalor:



So true.  But sadly, many teachers, experienced or not, don't want to teach disabled students.  Too much work.  There is a high burn out rate for special education teachers too.



 



 




 

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