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What has your child's school told you? PIOG

Posted by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:23 AM
  • 26 Replies

Do you know the standards for education are changing in the states all over the country?

Most states across the country, have adopted the Common Core Standards for education. 

There will be some pretty significant changes to how children are taught and what they are expected to be able to do. State tests are on their way out. But they will be replaced by the PARCC in grades K-12.

Has your school done anything to let parents know about the changes taking place?

We are trying to find the best way to convey this to parents at our school. 

by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:23 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 11:10 PM
Yup -definitely a topic covered at back to school night, conferences, at SAC meetings, etc...
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TranquilMind
by Member on Mar. 30, 2013 at 11:52 PM
1 mom liked this

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  

Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 

It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.

There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 

Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.

No, just no. 

 

Losers will be students. 

Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:12 AM
How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?

Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.

While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.




Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  


Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 


It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.


There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 


Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.


No, just no. 


 


Losers will be students. 


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
maxswolfsuit
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:25 AM

I do wonder how much money they really are making. 

The big states are on regular cycles of text book adoption anyway. So the companies would have been selling tons of new text books regardless of the standards. But with the changes they should have spent more time and money in the development of the the materials. (We'll see about that, we're waiting for reading text book samples as we speak)  We've been given the specifications the publishers were given. Assuming they're followed (and I think they have to be to get on the state approved list) the new texts should be greatly improved. 

I know many states don't get new text books as often. I wonder what the actual difference will be when comes to how much they actually sell compared to historical sales. 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?

Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.

While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.




Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  


Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 


It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.


There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 


Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.


No, just no. 




Losers will be students. 



maxswolfsuit
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:27 AM

Also, 

While I understand your dislike of the theory of the common core. How do you feel about the standards themselves?

I actually think the changes will be very positive. They definitely address some of the shortcoming of the current curriculum and standards.  

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?

Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.

While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.




Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  


Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 


It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.


There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 


Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.


No, just no. 




Losers will be students. 



Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:33 AM
We are also waiting for our new reading series...

Right now there are rumors as to whether some grades are getting new math series, bc our series we adopted a couple years ago do not align with CC... Right now, it is a mystery, as two competing good sources in the district are saying different things... We were not due for new math series yet, so we shall see.

I have read some interesting articles on some numbers in regards to profits from CC by some... If I come across them again ill post them..




Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I do wonder how much money they really are making. 

The big states are on regular cycles of text book adoption anyway. So the companies would have been selling tons of new text books regardless of the standards. But with the changes they should have spent more time and money in the development of the the materials. (We'll see about that, we're waiting for reading text book samples as we speak)  We've been given the specifications the publishers were given. Assuming they're followed (and I think they have to be to get on the state approved list) the new texts should be greatly improved. 

I know many states don't get new text books as often. I wonder what the actual difference will be when comes to how much they actually sell compared to historical sales. 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?



Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.



While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.









Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  



Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 



It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.



There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 



Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.



No, just no. 






Losers will be students. 





Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
maxswolfsuit
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:38 AM

Our district has decided to hold off on math until next year. They knew that doing new math and reading the same year would make it really difficult for teachers to really do either as effectively as possible. 


Quoting Kris_PBG:

We are also waiting for our new reading series...

Right now there are rumors as to whether some grades are getting new math series, bc our series we adopted a couple years ago do not align with CC... Right now, it is a mystery, as two competing good sources in the district are saying different things... We were not due for new math series yet, so we shall see.

I have read some interesting articles on some numbers in regards to profits from CC by some... If I come across them again ill post them..




Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I do wonder how much money they really are making. 

The big states are on regular cycles of text book adoption anyway. So the companies would have been selling tons of new text books regardless of the standards. But with the changes they should have spent more time and money in the development of the the materials. (We'll see about that, we're waiting for reading text book samples as we speak)  We've been given the specifications the publishers were given. Assuming they're followed (and I think they have to be to get on the state approved list) the new texts should be greatly improved. 

I know many states don't get new text books as often. I wonder what the actual difference will be when comes to how much they actually sell compared to historical sales. 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?



Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.



While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.









Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  



Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 



It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.



There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 



Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.



No, just no. 






Losers will be students. 






Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:43 AM
I am not a lover of them. While I don't think they are the worst things ever, I find issues with some of the primary grades CC... There are some skills missing that I think should be more explicitly stated and I have an issue with the vagueness of some of the standards. A lot of them read "with prompting and support...", which in K drives us nuts, as we joke we could prompt and support nearly anyone - what is the level we are looking for? It is an ongoing conversation...

That being said, I don't understand why people think the standards take away or diminish from great lessons or teachable moments. In some ways, CC does have some positive aspects as well...

I have not read upper grade CC standards, but I have read articles that says CC was developed without any actual early education teachers, which is kind of how it feels...

They don't limit what I can do in the class though and I am curious to see the new curriculum.



Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Also, 

While I understand your dislike of the theory of the common core. How do you feel about the standards themselves?

I actually think the changes will be very positive. They definitely address some of the shortcoming of the current curriculum and standards.  

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?



Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.



While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.









Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  



Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 



It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.



There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 



Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.



No, just no. 






Losers will be students. 





Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:47 AM
I hear you... I doubt we are getting new math to be honest... But it is very annoying to have curriculum that does not match the standards. Oh well - we've dealt with it this long... Lol!


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Our district has decided to hold off on math until next year. They knew that doing new math and reading the same year would make it really difficult for teachers to really do either as effectively as possible. 


Quoting Kris_PBG:

We are also waiting for our new reading series...



Right now there are rumors as to whether some grades are getting new math series, bc our series we adopted a couple years ago do not align with CC... Right now, it is a mystery, as two competing good sources in the district are saying different things... We were not due for new math series yet, so we shall see.



I have read some interesting articles on some numbers in regards to profits from CC by some... If I come across them again ill post them..









Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I do wonder how much money they really are making. 

The big states are on regular cycles of text book adoption anyway. So the companies would have been selling tons of new text books regardless of the standards. But with the changes they should have spent more time and money in the development of the the materials. (We'll see about that, we're waiting for reading text book samples as we speak)  We've been given the specifications the publishers were given. Assuming they're followed (and I think they have to be to get on the state approved list) the new texts should be greatly improved. 

I know many states don't get new text books as often. I wonder what the actual difference will be when comes to how much they actually sell compared to historical sales. 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?





Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.





While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.














Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  




Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 




It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.




There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 




Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.




No, just no. 








Losers will be students. 









Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
maxswolfsuit
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:50 AM

I see what you're saying. They certainly aren't perfect. 

But I do see several significant improvements. The increased expectations in problem solving skills and text complexity are two things I've been saying for a long time. So I'm glad to see those changes. 

This is the third set of standards introduced since I started teaching. Every time they change people freak out and expect the worst. In reality it doesn't change nearly as much of the day to day instruction people thin it will. I totally agree that there's no way new standards should ruin the learning going on in the classroom. Great teachers will continue to great things. 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

I am not a lover of them. While I don't think they are the worst things ever, I find issues with some of the primary grades CC... There are some skills missing that I think should be more explicitly stated and I have an issue with the vagueness of some of the standards. A lot of them read "with prompting and support...", which in K drives us nuts, as we joke we could prompt and support nearly anyone - what is the level we are looking for? It is an ongoing conversation...

That being said, I don't understand why people think the standards take away or diminish from great lessons or teachable moments. In some ways, CC does have some positive aspects as well...

I have not read upper grade CC standards, but I have read articles that says CC was developed without any actual early education teachers, which is kind of how it feels...

They don't limit what I can do in the class though and I am curious to see the new curriculum.



Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Also, 

While I understand your dislike of the theory of the common core. How do you feel about the standards themselves?

I actually think the changes will be very positive. They definitely address some of the shortcoming of the current curriculum and standards.  

Quoting Kris_PBG:

How do you know what the schools are saying if your child does not attend?



Our discussions happened during conferences. Uses you had a child for a conference, you would have no clue what was said.



While I am no fan of common core in theory, they are standards, not entirely different than we had before. I agree it is a great money making venture for Pearson and the like, but they in no way take away from great teaching moments in classrooms.









Quoting TranquilMind:

Oh, yeah.  Since my state has some higher standards than the Common Core, and since I know that I personally do as a homeschooler, I'm not particularly a fan.  



Schools are saying nothing here.  You have to follow the political debates. 



It's just another means to create perfect cogs in the wheel, which is what a standardized education is designed to do.  The beneficiaries will be curriculum developers,. College Board, ACT,  ETS, Pearson and Pearson, and other enforcers and testing services.



There will be no more room for those great moments where a class takes on a life of its own and the teacher and kids go with it.  They will just slog through the same material at the same pace on the same day....no thanks. 



Where I really draw the line is the freaking database gathering and disseminating information on every student nationally from preschool to at least the end of high school.



No, just no. 






Losers will be students. 






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You must be a member to reply to this post.
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