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Eating Lunch at School...

Posted by on Aug. 21, 2011 at 11:07 AM
  • 10 Replies

I know it's his first week in school, but Mehdi is having a really hard time with lunch at school.

He doesn't like the cafeteria because the sound bothers him a lot.  But he doesn't like milk, and that is all they offer him.  So I stared sending juice to school with him.  Then one day he forgot his juice and he was so upset and they didn't get it for him, so he couldn't eat anything.

I'm going to start sending his lunch to school with him starting tomorrow.  But then there is the time and I know it's normal.  But he can't eat that fast.  They have like 25 minutes and he never ate that fast.

And socially, I am trying to get him to meet another child at his table so he won't feel so alone, but I don't think he has yet because he keeps telling me he doesn't know anyone at his table.

I'm venting and hoping it will get better.  But I'm not really happy with the school right now.  I think he should have a little help.  He does fine getting his meal etc...but they need more than 2 lunch monitors in the cafeteria for all those kindergartners!!!  

by on Aug. 21, 2011 at 11:07 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Elayna90
by on Aug. 21, 2011 at 3:55 PM
Can you have it put in his IEP? My son had it in his IEP that he needed assistance at lunch.
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newmommy-again
by on Aug. 21, 2011 at 11:30 PM

You can add extra time into the IEP too and maybe deal with the noise issue and maybe the milk/juice thing too.

sukainah
by on Aug. 22, 2011 at 12:04 AM

Perhaps we can.  I emailed his special ed teacher and we are discussing what we can do.  I need to be on top of this because she said she will have the lunch room monitors keep an eye on him.  I don't like that.  Are they trained?  

We will be working on this.  

Elayna90
by on Aug. 22, 2011 at 1:30 AM
Many times the moniters are trained to assist or at least trained to watch for those who might need assistance.
A lot of children need help at mealtimes, with the feeding, eating, and social aspect, and that is what they are there for.
I will explain how it worked for my son last year so maybe you can get an idea.
At the beginning of the year, they had a monitet who helped him through most of lunch. She didn't sit with him but stayed close by. She would help him to the table and getting him started eating. He is a slow eater too so she would frequently stop by to remind him to eat and make sure he was doing ok.
As he progressed, she helped less and less, just keeping an eye out and providing assistance when needed.
Toward the end of the year and this year, there is an older student assigned to be his " helper" and she helps to get his lunch and get it open or get him settled.
The moniters know to keep an eye out and sometimes remind him that he needs to eat.
Part of what they teach them is to eat in the amount of time given. If they are not able to eat that quickly for some reason, an IEP can give that time.
Also, here anyway, they don't encourage socialization much in the lunchroom. They focus more on the eating part of things. If the children finish, then they can talk, but they prefer that for the playground.
It is part of teaching time management.
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sukainah
by on Aug. 23, 2011 at 1:43 AM

This is helpful!

I wrote an email to his special ed teacher and asked if they can do this to help him adjust.  And I'd be fine if the monitors would help him somewhat and just make sure he's doing okay.  

Will let you know what I hear.

Quoting Elayna90:

Many times the moniters are trained to assist or at least trained to watch for those who might need assistance.
A lot of children need help at mealtimes, with the feeding, eating, and social aspect, and that is what they are there for.
I will explain how it worked for my son last year so maybe you can get an idea.
At the beginning of the year, they had a monitet who helped him through most of lunch. She didn't sit with him but stayed close by. She would help him to the table and getting him started eating. He is a slow eater too so she would frequently stop by to remind him to eat and make sure he was doing ok.
As he progressed, she helped less and less, just keeping an eye out and providing assistance when needed.
Toward the end of the year and this year, there is an older student assigned to be his " helper" and she helps to get his lunch and get it open or get him settled.
The moniters know to keep an eye out and sometimes remind him that he needs to eat.
Part of what they teach them is to eat in the amount of time given. If they are not able to eat that quickly for some reason, an IEP can give that time.
Also, here anyway, they don't encourage socialization much in the lunchroom. They focus more on the eating part of things. If the children finish, then they can talk, but they prefer that for the playground.
It is part of teaching time management.


sukainah
by on Aug. 23, 2011 at 7:21 PM

He did so much better today.  The let him eat longer and he still was able to go to recess.

Yesterday he was sad because he was no able to finish his lunch, dropped his PB&J and got jelly and his pants and that upset him, then at recess, he was still hungry and was crying.  Well this morning, his classmates mother told me that her daughter told her that when Mehdi was crying, he had some snot come out of his nose and some kids were laughing at him.  I cried so much this morning because of that.  I mean, if this is the socialization he is getting by going to school, then why?  I was almost ready to pull him out, but we will see how it goes. I know it's good for him to have the speech therapy and everything.  I'm just so sad today and hope it did not bother him.  He did not mention it at all.

Elayna90
by on Aug. 23, 2011 at 7:47 PM
I am glad he did better today.
The rest of it made me sad for him. It is one of our biggest fears when it comes to our kids and school. Hopefully he didn't notice but maybe try talking to him about it and see if he brings the other kids up.
You should also talk to someone about the whole incident. There are so many things wrong with it.
Is he in a regular classroom?

(((hugs))) It does get better, momma. Last year, when my oldest started school I dreaded it and just wanted to pull him out. Everything settled down and it has been the best possible thing for him, for more than just the therapies.
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newmommy-again
by on Aug. 24, 2011 at 9:09 AM

The playground incident is very disturbing - but at least the little girl told her mother who then told you.  Without that, you never would have known and things may have gotten worse.  But now you know, so you can work on some things.

sukainah
by on Aug. 24, 2011 at 12:36 PM

Exactly.  I emailed them immediately and hope that they will pay more attention.

Quoting newmommy-again:

The playground incident is very disturbing - but at least the little girl told her mother who then told you.  Without that, you never would have known and things may have gotten worse.  But now you know, so you can work on some things.


sukainah
by on Aug. 24, 2011 at 12:39 PM

He went to PreK last year, but they stayed in the classroom for everything and they didn't mix with the other classes.  They helped him so much in PreK.  

And Yes, he is in a regular class and the special teachers visit with him during the week.

Quoting Elayna90:

I am glad he did better today.
The rest of it made me sad for him. It is one of our biggest fears when it comes to our kids and school. Hopefully he didn't notice but maybe try talking to him about it and see if he brings the other kids up.
You should also talk to someone about the whole incident. There are so many things wrong with it.
Is he in a regular classroom?

(((hugs))) It does get better, momma. Last year, when my oldest started school I dreaded it and just wanted to pull him out. Everything settled down and it has been the best possible thing for him, for more than just the therapies.


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