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Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

Mixed Receptive Expressive Language Disorder (MRELD)

Posted by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 6:59 AM
  • 17 Replies
1 mom liked this

 My 3 year old daughter, Cara, was recently diagnosed with a sever case of developmental Mixed Receptive Expressive Language Disorder (MRELD).  They have started her in an Early Childhood Special Education program.  She goes 1/2 days, 4 days a week and works with a Speech Therapist 2-3 times a week for 30 minutes.

Cara's problem isn't with Speech or Articulation.  She has a difficult time understanding the concepts of language. I've been told that when people talk to her it's as if they are speaking a foreign language. She is very intelligent and has managed to teach herself colors, numbers, shapes and a few letters. A few examples of day to day "complications"..   Cara can respond to her name when she is spoken to, but if you ask her what her name is she can't or doesn't know how to answer you.  She can point to an object and tell you what color it is but if you turn it around and ask her what color it is, she doesn't know how to respond.

We recently contacted Western Michigan University's Speech Pathology Clinic with hopes that we can get her some extra, much needed assistance.

I was wondering if anyone knows anything about MRELD or the best way to go about teaching her.  I've been trying to find information but it appears as though there isn't all that much info on it out there.

by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 6:59 AM
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Replies (1-10):
jjamom
by Michele on Dec. 21, 2012 at 8:55 AM

I have never heard of it.  But here is a bump.  Good luck!

LDennany
by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 10:04 AM

 Thank you!

Quoting jjamom:

I have never heard of it.  But here is a bump.  Good luck!

 

TheGiggleGang
by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 11:46 AM

So Sorry about your little Girl I know what it's like for everyday Struggles with Speech My son 6 Stutters ALOT use to be so bad that he would REfuse to talk at all after many weeks of Daily Speech we are improving but not completely back to Normal 

LDennany
by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 12:01 PM

 Thank you.  I'm trying very hard to stay positive.  She's only been there for a little over a month but so far we haven't had much progress.  At this point she is at a 24 month olds ability to understand language.  The Speech Therapists goal is to get her to a 3 year olds ability by the end of a year.  So, I guess that means we are going to try to keep her at least a year behind.  Which is okay...I think.  I just worry for her in the long run.  I guess we'll just have to see where this very interesting road is going to take us and decide what to do when the times arise. 

I'm glad your son is improving.  It's very difficult having a child that has a hard time communicating.  Keep with it!!

Quoting TheGiggleGang:

So Sorry about your little Girl I know what it's like for everyday Struggles with Speech My son 6 Stutters ALOT use to be so bad that he would REfuse to talk at all after many weeks of Daily Speech we are improving but not completely back to Normal 

 

jjamom
by Michele on Dec. 21, 2012 at 1:09 PM
1 mom liked this

My son sort of has the opposite issue, he understands most of what is said (receptive) but his expressive language skills are very delayed.  He is 7 and we are working on 3-4 word phrases, but also still working on a variety of sounds that he still cannot make and some other things he does like "backing", where for example, any word beginning with "s" will have the s sound at the end instead of the beginning and often an "h" sound at the front.  For example, he says "hi hers" for scissors.   He calls my daughter, CC "Hee hees".   He does that with a few different letters.  A lot of his language is still incomprehensible.  People who do not know him can not often tell what he is saying.  Some is clear, some not so much.  He has been in speech therapy since he was 2 and in private as well as school-based speech since age 3-4.  It is definitely a long road, at least for us, but we do see improvements over time.  The thing with the goals is that it needs to be a goal that they feel is attainable in the given period of time.  If she achieves her goal, they will add more.  When it comes to kids with speech delays or issues of vsrying kinda, it is often baby steps, but every step forward is a step in the right direction!

Quoting LDennany:

 Thank you.  I'm trying very hard to stay positive.  She's only been there for a little over a month but so far we haven't had much progress.  At this point she is at a 24 month olds ability to understand language.  The Speech Therapists goal is to get her to a 3 year olds ability by the end of a year.  So, I guess that means we are going to try to keep her at least a year behind.  Which is okay...I think.  I just worry for her in the long run.  I guess we'll just have to see where this very interesting road is going to take us and decide what to do when the times arise. 

I'm glad your son is improving.  It's very difficult having a child that has a hard time communicating.  Keep with it!!

Quoting TheGiggleGang:

So Sorry about your little Girl I know what it's like for everyday Struggles with Speech My son 6 Stutters ALOT use to be so bad that he would REfuse to talk at all after many weeks of Daily Speech we are improving but not completely back to Normal 

 


scarykiddiemom
by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 1:22 PM

I have never heard of MRELD but my 4 year old son definitely has the characteristics of it that you describe.   Usually these language deficits are associated with the autism spectrum.  Has anyone mentioned it to you or are her play skills, social, fine and gross motor skills age appropriate?  I guess if those areas of development are not delayed then you can rule out autism.  Does she have issues with basic pronoun usage (she's only 3).  For example saying "you want this" instead of "I want this".  Typical children learn immediately a sense of self in language.  For children with autism related language disorders pronouns are an issue.  

LDennany
by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 1:27 PM

 We have had her tested and she doesn't fall on the spectrum.  She doesn't usually refer to herself at all.  She will say "you take this" to us.  The only time we ever hear her refer to herself is (recently) if we show her a picture of her and ask "Who is this?"  She'll respond, "Nooo, that's a Cara."  Which means she is beginning to recognize herself (Yay). 

Quoting scarykiddiemom:

I have never heard of MRELD but my 4 year old son definitely has the characteristics of it that you describe.   Usually these language deficits are associated with the autism spectrum.  Has anyone mentioned it to you or are her play skills, social, fine and gross motor skills age appropriate?  I guess if those areas of development are not delayed then you can rule out autism.  Does she have issues with basic pronoun usage (she's only 3).  For example saying "you want this" instead of "I want this".  Typical children learn immediately a sense of self in language.  For children with autism related language disorders pronouns are an issue.  

 

megandwade
by Member on Dec. 21, 2012 at 3:34 PM
1 mom liked this

I know exactly how you feel!! My son is also diagnosed with severe receptive/expressive language disorder! He is 2 years old and completely non verbal. At first we were concerned that he was deaf because he was completely unresponsive but after having his hearing tested and getting involved in the different therapies he has made much improvement! He now makes sounds like woo woo (for a train) and woof woof) for a puppy but no words. We are also involved with the Early Intervention program. He has a speech, occupational, and special interest therapist that come into the home each once a week for an hour and work with him. We also have him enrolled in an early headstart program. They have socials 3 or 4 times a month where he can go to the facility and play with other kids. They've told me getting him around other kids can help tremendously! We also saw a speech therapist at our Speech Pathology clinic once a week for about 6 months and those session also made a noticeable improvement.

I have so much information that I can share with you! Does your daughter have any other issues besides the speech? For example my son also has some sensory issues... and the social issues that go along with not being able to communicate. Is she a picky eater? This can also be related to the communication disorder as the muscles we use to eat are the same we use to talk. We have an awesome speech therapist that does a lot of work trying to strengthen my sons muscles in his jaw and his awareness of his tongue. This has made a big difference in his eating habits and the sounds he makes!

I know the thing that has helped my son the most has been learning sign language. We are now up to about 20 signs that he uses appropriately and regularly. Once he figured out he could use the signs to communicate they just started taking off and he picks them up fairly easily! We are now working on signing colors!

My biggest worry with my son is that people are going to perceive him as "stupid" because he is unable to communicate and that other kids tend to ignore him and not interact with him. He is actually extremely intelligent but is often dismissed because he doesnt speak.

Good Luck to you and Cara! Its nice to find someone who can relate with this disorder!



darbyakeep45
by Darby on Dec. 22, 2012 at 4:52 AM

Welcome and glad these ladies have some good thoughts for you:)  Hugs mama!

Liveron
by on Dec. 22, 2012 at 7:32 AM
1 mom liked this

My daughter started receiving Speech/Language services at age 3 and she continues now at age 8. Her rate of progress has seemed very slow at times, especially when she was younger, and I see that you're worried about that with your daughter. The brain is a very, very complex organ. The good news is that they CAN address this problem, and she WILL improve. So much progress will come by her just getting older. There may be times where you wonder if she will ever progress--those are the times you just have to hang in there. She'll get there, mom!

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