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My high functioning autistic child will not try any new foods. I need advice from moms who have been through this. I've been putting food on her plate for years and she won't try carrot sticks or spinach leaves for example. I'm really tired of this and I'm sure you guys are tired of the topic of this post but I don't know what to do. I'm tired of trying to hide veggies in her food and really you only get so many veggies when they are hidden. She just will not try anything new. Please feel free to share recipies, tips..whatever. It will be appreciated. Thanks

by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 6:41 PM
Replies (31-34):
AylinsMom
by on Feb. 3, 2013 at 6:45 PM

hmmm I'm not sure if she likes raisins for the taste or texture but probably the texture since she won't touch a grape to save her life. lol


Quoting Kalic0:

Does she like raisins for the taste or the texture?  I ask because my moderately effected son is a very picky but texture drives most of his food choices (more then taste). If texture is a big deal for her then the advice of trying new things with similar textures to what she already eats will work. The funny thing for me is that my son will not eat much in the way of meat.  I can get him to eat any vegetable or fruit if it is chewy, crunchy or crispy.  If it is too mushy to squishy he will refuse it.  He does not like the texture of most meat so the only way I can get him to eat it is if it is crispy or breaded.  

Take heart though, sometimes they will go back to things they used to like that they rejected when they were toddlers or pre-school age.  My son originally ate cooked carrots and bananas and then later refused them.  He will now eat them again - even if only sometimes.

Oh, also, if she prefers mushy, maybe try cooked versions.  Even though raw has more nutrician, cooked is better then not eating any (even well cooked).



AylinsMom
by on Feb. 3, 2013 at 6:47 PM

I occassionally buy the Pediasure sidekicks...thank God for those but they are so expensive.

Quoting Autism_Momx2:

My 3 1/2 year old will not eat any real food. He only eats pepperonis, yogurt, and the ocasional chicken nugget or pb&j. Nothing has worked for us so far, we use pediasure to help him get the nutrients he needs



grammajuie
by Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 1:30 PM

My grandson is 5 1/2 and has aspergers, amoung other special needs.  He is very picky too.  His parents never push food on him.  They offer it and accept his answer.  They willl often get him to "kiss" the new food and then let him decide if he wants to taste it.  They never preasure him.  Yes, it means cooking two different meals, but it is worth it in the long run.  Over time, he has suddenly asked for a new food and they always show great excitement.  As was said by others, you must be flexible.  Remember, your daughter has an illness.  She can't help the way she was born.  If she had an illness that affected her legs, you wouldn't be angry that she didn't walk.  You would support her and encourage her efforts, but not push her past what she was capable of at that time.  The best thing you can do for her and yourself is learn all you can about what the effect of apergers is on your daughter and how you can best help her.

Love and patience is the best medicine.  Good Luck.

AylinsMom
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 8:25 PM

Well...she helped me bake zuchinni coins today and when they were done she pushed the plate away. She wouldn't try them but I knew she wouldn't because I've only made them a few times. I heard of  the "kissing the food" thing but she wouldn't do that today. Yes, I do have to remind myself that she has autism. It does get frustrating at times. I gave her grapes today and she won't eat those. I'm going to see if she'll eat frozen ones (they say picky eaters like them).


Quoting grammajuie:

My grandson is 5 1/2 and has aspergers, amoung other special needs.  He is very picky too.  His parents never push food on him.  They offer it and accept his answer.  They willl often get him to "kiss" the new food and then let him decide if he wants to taste it.  They never preasure him.  Yes, it means cooking two different meals, but it is worth it in the long run.  Over time, he has suddenly asked for a new food and they always show great excitement.  As was said by others, you must be flexible.  Remember, your daughter has an illness.  She can't help the way she was born.  If she had an illness that affected her legs, you wouldn't be angry that she didn't walk.  You would support her and encourage her efforts, but not push her past what she was capable of at that time.  The best thing you can do for her and yourself is learn all you can about what the effect of apergers is on your daughter and how you can best help her.

Love and patience is the best medicine.  Good Luck.



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