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Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

Homebound schooling vs. Homeschooling

Posted by on Sep. 10, 2013 at 2:14 PM
  • 11 Replies
Ok, we really do not want to homeschool Ty. I know we've been back and forth on it for various reasons though. Overall, Ty *thrives* on a school setting. And its the only socialization he gets with other kids. It provides structure for him and he also learns a ton from his peers which has been so beneficial in his development.

However, in school they are only "allowed" to miss 10 days and then they start trying to figure out what's going on. At 18, you get truancy crap started. Some letter about facing truancy chargers or whatever. As of today, Ty has missed 11 days of school already and its only been one month. Now it is in his IEP/504 (he has both) that he will miss more days than usual. we spoke with the school yesterday and we are meeting Monday to adjust his plans cuz he has food restrictions and the GJ now. We are also keeping him home this week (oh, we are getting released today!) Which the school knows. So we are going to discuss his schooling Monday and talk about homebound if we need to do it.

So my question is: what is the difference between homebound and homeschooling?
by on Sep. 10, 2013 at 2:14 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Sep. 10, 2013 at 5:15 PM

I'm not sure but my guess is that with homebound schooling, you have someone in charge of your son's education and materials. Someone from the school or board of education whereas with homeschooling, as long as you are within the laws of your state, you can do it anyway you want.

jjamom
by Michele on Sep. 10, 2013 at 5:28 PM
I believe (but it may vary from place to place) that homeschooling is the option where you withdraw your child from the public schools and teach them yourself at home or through a homeschool coop.

Home bound would be where a teacher from the school system would come into your home to work with Ty when he cannot (for medical reasons) attend school.

It sounds like you would want option 2, if it comes to that.

Also, I didn't think the truancy laws could be enforced with a child with SN who has an IEP and known medical issues? Surely when your son is hospitalized or home on the advice of a doctor, they cannot expect you to send him to school!
Bluecalm
by Silver Member on Sep. 10, 2013 at 5:52 PM
2 moms liked this
I know this one! For attendance you will send in paperwork from his doctor about his medical condition. Then every time he is absent you reference that medical condition and the info you sent them. He will need a dr's note each time.

Homebound means his teacher prepares lessons for Ty. She'll make a packet of work for the homebound teacher who will meet with him, maybe twice a week, and present the lessons to him. She'll assign homework based on the teacher's work and will take his completed work to his classroom teacher to grade. Or some similar version depending on your district. Homeschool means you withdraw him and teach him yourself.
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darbyakeep45
by Darby on Sep. 10, 2013 at 6:46 PM

I agree 100% here!  Hugs mama!  Glad you guys get to go home today:)

Quoting jjamom:

I believe (but it may vary from place to place) that homeschooling is the option where you withdraw your child from the public schools and teach them yourself at home or through a homeschool coop.

Home bound would be where a teacher from the school system would come into your home to work with Ty when he cannot (for medical reasons) attend school.

It sounds like you would want option 2, if it comes to that.

Also, I didn't think the truancy laws could be enforced with a child with SN who has an IEP and known medical issues? Surely when your son is hospitalized or home on the advice of a doctor, they cannot expect you to send him to school!


Mipsy
by Chelle on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:22 AM
You guys rock!!! I would want homebound over homeschooling it sounds like.


Jja, I dunno if truancy laws can/will affect us, but I worry about it. At the same time, we have government people and drs in our life all the time who can attest to his condition and whereabouts. This is just my first child in school, so I get paranoid. We work with him when he misses school and always do his homework, so we try hard to keep him caught up. He's just going through some bad stuff, we may need to keep him home til this settles. But hopefully he will feel up to school by Monday
Bluecalm
by Silver Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 5:14 AM
I'd address the absence issue upfront with the school and also with the schoolboard's attendance clerk. Ask exactly how to document so there are no problems later. A friend of mine 's son spent two years on homebound and really wanted to be in school his senior year. He missed more than 5 days the first semester and even with him having a serious health problem she still was threatened with jail for him being truant. I think the problem was she did not take him to the doctor every single time he was out for sickness and didn't have a dr's note so it wasn't excused.


Quoting Mipsy:

You guys rock!!! I would want homebound over homeschooling it sounds like.





Jja, I dunno if truancy laws can/will affect us, but I worry about it. At the same time, we have government people and drs in our life all the time who can attest to his condition and whereabouts. This is just my first child in school, so I get paranoid. We work with him when he misses school and always do his homework, so we try hard to keep him caught up. He's just going through some bad stuff, we may need to keep him home til this settles. But hopefully he will feel up to school by Monday

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mandee1503
by Amanda on Sep. 11, 2013 at 5:55 AM
Sounds like good advice from these ladies. Glad he's being released!
MamaLauri
by Bronze Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 8:48 AM

I would encourage you to find out your school districts specific rules on homebound schooling. Long term homebound schooling is expensive for the school. Since he has an IEP, he is in the IDEA program and the school does recieve extra federal money for that. Even so, some schools do not like special conditions, so make it hard for you to live with.   

In one case, "students approved for homebound instruction receive at least one hour of instructional service, provided by a certified teacher, for each day of eligible absence from school, but a student qualifying for homebound instruction must complete all approved homebound hours. Hours not completed revert to absences."

How the instructional service is provided is not defined. It could be just an email of today's material. So the parents must provide proof of completion of hours and are essentially homeschooling under the direction of the remote teacher with limited support. Other schools provide tutors that directly interact with your child, under the guidance of the teacher. Attendance is not strictly hours based. Giving more needed flexibility.  

It is important that your son be able to attend school when he can. It is essential to know your rights through IDEA and the schools homebound rules up front, so you can negotiate a plan with the school and teacher with no nasty surprises, and figure out what you can live with.

Good luck!

Linagma03
by Gold Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 4:29 PM

I don't know the difference but it sounds like the other Mom's know what it is. Lina has missed more than the alloted days the last couple of years I get a computer phone call telling me my kid was not in school and to send a note if it was excused. I've never been questioned by the school/district or CPS or anyone. Sometimes I don't call the school before we leave for a morning appt if I think she is going to be at school later, then I tell attendance when I get there. Most of the time I send a note to school for the teacher and tell the bus driver that she won't be at school the next day. I tell the bus driver because then she won't have to drive the extra 10 miles to pick up Lina. 

DDDaysh
by on Sep. 11, 2013 at 4:39 PM

I was a public school teacher for a while.  

You want to look into homebound and get it written into his IEP.  Even though they might give you difficulty about it, you can actually move in and out of homebound as needed.  

I had one student who had a serious neurological condition.  Some days his nerves would act up and he'd be writhing on the floor in pain that even morphine couldn't help.  Other days he'd be fine.  

His IEP was written to where he came to school when he could and got put on the Homebound teacher's visit schedule any time he missed more than two consecutive days.  

You should also be aware that IEPs can allow you to modify his daily schedule.  For instance, if he tires too easily to attend a full day, he can start late or end early.  

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