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Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

Dyscalculia?

Posted by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM
  • 25 Replies

Have any of your children been diagnosed with this? I never even heard of it until they diagnosed DD after doing her Neuropsych eval. I just thought she was really bad at math...and she is lol but I didn't know that there was actually a name for this. She has a very hard time reading a clock, writes money with time symbols ex. $4.25 would be written 4:25. She has  the hardest time deciding to add, subtract, multipy or divide when doing a word problem. She is 11 and strangely enough she scored very, very low when it came to picking out the two same numbers when in a group: like this: 1 7 4 7 . I just could really belive it. She reads on almost an 8th grade level but is closer to a 3rd grade level in math.

If your child has this how are you helping them? What have you noticed works best for them?



by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mlogsdon
by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:11 AM
I've never heard of this, sorry. I hope you're able to get helpful information though.
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DDDaysh
by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:13 AM

I've never heard of it either, sorry!  

What is the school suggesting?  How is she with every day tasks that require math, like baking or shopping?  

Decemberlov
by Member on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:14 AM

Thank you...yeah I didn't either until yesterday lol.

It was basically explained to me as math dyslexia.

Quoting mlogsdon:

I've never heard of this, sorry. I hope you're able to get helpful information though.


Decemberlov
by Member on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:20 AM

I haven't spoke with the school yet. The neurologist is suggesting they let her use a calculator for math class. Also highliting the symbols on any problems to help eliminate confusion.

The only thing she has ever really made on her own is rice krispi treats and memorized - use 6 of this and one of this sort of thing. Last week when making them she told me she needed "6 inces of butter" for the recipe lol.

Shopping not so good...she can not rememeber what the coin values are.

Quoting DDDaysh:

I've never heard of it either, sorry!  

What is the school suggesting?  How is she with every day tasks that require math, like baking or shopping?  


darbyakeep45
by Darby on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:22 AM

Hugs mama...I've never heard of it!

jjamom
by Michele on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:23 AM
1 mom liked this

I have heard of it, since I was an Elem school teacher, but I never had a student with it, so I have never seen it first hand.  

Decemberlov
by Member on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:26 AM

Thank you :)

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Hugs mama...I've never heard of it!


DDDaysh
by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 11:41 AM

Well, while the calculator may help with the arithmetic, it isn't really a solution to the larger problem.  Sure if they highlight the symbols and give her a calculator she can probably figure out what numbers to push, but what's the point in that.  

The real problem here seems to be the lack of problem solving skills.  You can get through life pretty easily without knowing your multiplication tables, after all most cell phones now have calculators, but she isn't going to be able to live independently very easily without some basic problem solving abilities, the school equivilant of which are word problems.  

Which is why I don't think highlighting the operations and handing her a calculator is a real solution to the problem.  I think she needs to be identified as LD in Math and an IEP with very specific goals needs to be established that will help her develop those skills.  Unfortunately, I'm not very familiar with how you bridge this gap specifically, but I think the issue is severe enough that it will probably require having her out of the general ed classroom for math so they can really focus on the things she needs to learn.  At 11, her classmates will soon be doing Algebra, and no amount of calculators or aids in the classroom are going to help jump the gap from where she is now to what they're going to be doing.  

At home, I think you need to work on alot of manipulatives and "Every Day Math" concepts.  If she likes to make rice crispies, make a double batch one day and see how well she can figure that out.  Make a half-batch another day.  Set aside every day to do a few problems with manipulatives.  I'd do it a couple of different ways.  A few times give her a specific word problem, "Jan has 6 bracelets and Kim has two, how many do they have all together?" and let her work it out with manipulatives.  

Also go the other way around.  Use flash cards as a tool to demonstrate what the problem is, then walk her through making a word problem that matches it.  So for instance if you had 4+5, you would help her come up with a problem like, "There are 4 apples in Tom's bucket, he picks 5 more.  How many apples does he have?"  Or if the flashcard said 10-3 you could help her come up with, "Carol had $10.  She spent $3 on a slice of Pizza.  How much money does she have left?"  Creating the problems based on the actual problem in front of her can help build different connections in her brain.  

Quoting Decemberlov:

I haven't spoke with the school yet. The neurologist is suggesting they let her use a calculator for math class. Also highliting the symbols on any problems to help eliminate confusion.

She the only thing she has ever really made on her own is rice krispi treats and memorized - use 6 of this and one of this. Last week when making them she told me she needed "6 inces of butter" for the recipe lol.

Shopping not so good...she can not rememeber what the coin values are.

Quoting DDDaysh:

I've never heard of it either, sorry!  

What is the school suggesting?  How is she with every day tasks that require math, like baking or shopping?  



Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Oct. 2, 2013 at 12:43 PM

*hugs*

We homeschooled my son from 4th grade on. He has this issue. I didn't get him tested for learning disabilities until the summer before college. He had won a very good athletic scholarship.

All during school I noticed that he could grasp math concepts quickly and easily but he could not do the calculations very well and it frustrated him to the point he didn't even want to try. He has memory issues too so though he could grasp these issues, he also didn't retain them long.

I wish I'd have known about this earlier so I could have found the right resources to help him all along. We did use math manipulables. We used Math U See which I'm disappointed with the results on college prep tests from. I wish I'd tried Jacobs Math and maybe Teaching Textbooks but he would only use Math U See after we found it.

Dyscalculia affects different students in different ways. Here is a link to some information.

http://www.ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/dyscalculia/what-is-dyscalculia

Decemberlov
by Member on Oct. 2, 2013 at 12:51 PM
1 mom liked this

Thank you for the link. I did notice that she could never really grasp the concept that if 2+4 = 6 that must mean that 4+2 also equals 6. Now it makes sense.

It's frustrating to us both - once I feel like I finnally get her to understand a problem, she can move on to the next problem that is basically the same and she just forgets it that quick. She will just start guessing numbers out of thin air.

She is in 5th grade now and we are also considering homeschooling.

Quoting Bleacheddecay:

*hugs*

We homeschooled my son from 4th grade on. He has this issue. I didn't get him tested for learning disabilities until the summer before college. He had won a very good athletic scholarship.

All during school I noticed that he could grasp math concepts quickly and easily but he could not do the calculations very well and it frustrated him to the point he didn't even want to try. He has memory issues too so though he could grasp these issues, he also didn't retain them long.

I wish I'd have known about this earlier so I could have found the right resources to help him all along. We did use math manipulables. We used Math U See which I'm disappointed with the results on college prep tests from. I wish I'd tried Jacobs Math and maybe Teaching Textbooks but he would only use Math U See after we found it.

Dyscalculia affects different students in different ways. Here is a link to some information.

http://www.ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/dyscalculia/what-is-dyscalculia


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