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Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

Sensory Questionnaire

Posted by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 10:25 PM
  • 15 Replies
My daughter had a evaluation by a physical therapist (three months after I requested one) and because she is currently doing/feeling better she passed with no concerns. Three months ago she was falling all the time and had no upper body strength. The physical therapist was wonderful and started asking about sensory issues. Today she dropped off a questionnaire for me to complete. I went through and answered it (pretty much yes/no questions) and am going to have my mom and sister do it too to see if we all see the same things. I just don't know where this will take us. I was wondering how many yeses in each category are needed for early intervention to agree there is an issue. I couldn't answer yes to every question in each of the groups but I could to maybe 3/4 in some of the groups. The interesting thing is the therapist followed us down the hall at daycare and watched my daughter spin in circles down for as long as she could and told me that was a sensory thing. I am not familiar with the sensory issues so this is all very new to me. I am just wondering what to expect.
by on Oct. 2, 2013 at 10:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
arkansasmama08
by Gold Member on Oct. 3, 2013 at 12:43 AM
Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.
Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.
Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?
2010twingirls
by on Oct. 3, 2013 at 5:56 AM
She gets speech now and also an educational component since she is over 3 yrs now. She constantly touches everything - even random people. So if we are in a checkout line she will touch the person in front of us. Her newest phase is to lick and/or kiss everything. When she opened her birthday presents she kissed them all. She licks people too. Her other issue is the moving, spinning, jumping, running, roughousing. She calmed down a lot this summer when she was sick, but now all of the behaviors are reappearing.


Quoting arkansasmama08:

Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.

Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.

Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?

darbyakeep45
by Darby on Oct. 3, 2013 at 6:32 AM

Exactly this.  Hugs mama!

Quoting arkansasmama08:

Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.
Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.
Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?


letstalk747
by Joy on Oct. 3, 2013 at 12:02 PM

yup , sensory seeking

crazy4chapstick
by Member on Oct. 3, 2013 at 7:37 PM

you just described my daughter.....she doesn't really spin but she is afraid of loud noises... bites her nails... rubs blankets, couches, etc..... freaks out in crowds/busy places or even just close quarters...pulls at her pants if she gets over excited.


Quoting arkansasmama08:

Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.
Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.
Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?


 

arkansasmama08
by Gold Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 9:07 AM
Sensory issues are a lot more involved and common than you'd believe. All 3 of mine have different sensory needs. My oldest is a seeker, constantly moving abd will literally throw himself against the wall and fall down. Yeah. My daughter is a seeker and avoider, though mostly avoider. She hates loud noises, big groups, crowded spaces, or bright paint and lights. My youngest is a seeker mostly. He spins, bounces, runs, picks at everything, chews on everything, constantly needs to be snuggled, and has a high pain tolerance. Our house can get crazy lol. Me? I'm an avoider ;). I get stressed out when the kids are all running in different directions and yelling all the time lol


Quoting crazy4chapstick:

you just described my daughter.....she doesn't really spin but she is afraid of loud noises... bites her nails... rubs blankets, couches, etc..... freaks out in crowds/busy places or even just close quarters...pulls at her pants if she gets over excited.




Quoting arkansasmama08:

Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.
Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.
Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?



 


2010twingirls
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:10 PM
If she does have a sensory issue, what do I do to help her - especially if early intervention can't help her? My other daughter has sound issues. I can't even pry her hands off her ears in a public bathroom to wash them. They go on the ears when we walk in the door and won't come off until we are out.


Quoting arkansasmama08:

Sensory issues are a lot more involved and common than you'd believe. All 3 of mine have different sensory needs. My oldest is a seeker, constantly moving abd will literally throw himself against the wall and fall down. Yeah. My daughter is a seeker and avoider, though mostly avoider. She hates loud noises, big groups, crowded spaces, or bright paint and lights. My youngest is a seeker mostly. He spins, bounces, runs, picks at everything, chews on everything, constantly needs to be snuggled, and has a high pain tolerance. Our house can get crazy lol. Me? I'm an avoider ;). I get stressed out when the kids are all running in different directions and yelling all the time lol




Quoting crazy4chapstick:

you just described my daughter.....she doesn't really spin but she is afraid of loud noises... bites her nails... rubs blankets, couches, etc..... freaks out in crowds/busy places or even just close quarters...pulls at her pants if she gets over excited.






Quoting arkansasmama08:

Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.
Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.
Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?





 



arkansasmama08
by Gold Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 7:10 PM
Find what bothers her and yet to compensate. If public bathrooms are too loud, let her wear headphones to the store. (My daughter does too, she's afraid of the toilets flushing). If bright lights bother her, try sunglasses. If she's a seeker, try things that work her large muscles or heavy work. Jumping, pulling a wagon with somebody in it, bike rides, swimming, all help.
2010twingirls
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 8:30 PM
Thank you. I have been trying to do something right :). I bought them a little trampoline for the house and a little play structure with climbing and a slide for inside. They also have bikes and wagons and are currently enrolled in swimming and dance. Soccer this summer was a big hit with them. I have a tendency to try to downplay things hoping they will learn to cope with things they don't like, but as they are getting older, it isn't working well. They just get more upset.


Quoting arkansasmama08:

Find what bothers her and yet to compensate. If public bathrooms are too loud, let her wear headphones to the store. (My daughter does too, she's afraid of the toilets flushing). If bright lights bother her, try sunglasses. If she's a seeker, try things that work her large muscles or heavy work. Jumping, pulling a wagon with somebody in it, bike rides, swimming, all help.

Linagma03
by Gold Member on Oct. 5, 2013 at 12:46 AM

 What you said about your youngest is what Lina has been doing. You described her behavior to a T. Does he get rough with animals? Not the wanting to hurt them rough but the touching them always, playing with their ears, hugging to tight? I think she hugs to tight because she likes the feel of the fur. I'm going to ask about one of those surveys.

Quoting arkansasmama08:

Sensory issues are a lot more involved and common than you'd believe. All 3 of mine have different sensory needs. My oldest is a seeker, constantly moving abd will literally throw himself against the wall and fall down. Yeah. My daughter is a seeker and avoider, though mostly avoider. She hates loud noises, big groups, crowded spaces, or bright paint and lights. My youngest is a seeker mostly. He spins, bounces, runs, picks at everything, chews on everything, constantly needs to be snuggled, and has a high pain tolerance. Our house can get crazy lol. Me? I'm an avoider ;). I get stressed out when the kids are all running in different directions and yelling all the time lol


Quoting crazy4chapstick:

you just described my daughter.....she doesn't really spin but she is afraid of loud noises... bites her nails... rubs blankets, couches, etc..... freaks out in crowds/busy places or even just close quarters...pulls at her pants if she gets over excited.


 


Quoting arkansasmama08:

Ahh, the sensory profiles. We know them well lol. Just try to answer as best you can abd key the therapist score them. They may not always make sense if you try to figure it out yourself.
Usually sensory issues will not get you ei by themselves. If she has sensory, cognitive, gross motor, or fine motor issues as well you may qualify. But the sensory needs have to be pretty extreme to go off them alone.
Spinning is sensory. That usually means they're either over excited and trying to burn it off, or under stimulated and seeking input. Look for other signs. Is she afraid of loud noises? Hates socks or tags? Picks at herself or other things? Bounces off the walls, furniture or people? Avoid or get antsy in crowds or busy places? Prefer the dark?

 


 


 

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