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Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by on Oct. 24, 2013 at 8:59 PM
  • 20 Replies
Help!!!

My son for the past few weeks has been on a sensory overload. He claps, pats his chest repeatedly, or stomps his foot. I need calming techniques that I can use at home and ones I can pass on to his teacher and assistants at his school.

Thanks in Advance!!
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by on Oct. 24, 2013 at 8:59 PM
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Replies (1-10):
poshkat
by on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:01 PM
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I took a soft towel and rubbed his legs, arms, and stomach. They have deep tissue brushes but I didn't have one so I used a towel
Momof4AEMW
by Silver Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 10:39 PM
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My son has SPD and responds well to deep pressure hugs, sensory toys, 'taco' roll-ups in a blanket, lining up cars, swinging, running and being tickled.  Or sometimes it is the more quiet bath, down time in his room, quiet, slow music.  It depends on what part of his system is off to what one he goes for but normally we can find one that clicks for him.  Good luck!

arkansasmama08
by Gold Member on Oct. 25, 2013 at 9:49 AM
1 mom liked this
These suggestions are great. Have you tried weighted vests or lap pads? Jumping on a trampoline or bouncing on a ball might help too
DyslexiaParent
by Member on Oct. 25, 2013 at 7:00 PM
1 mom liked this

Rocking.. It can help.  Otherwise, looks like you have good suggestions from others.

darbyakeep45
by Darby on Oct. 25, 2013 at 7:28 PM

These ladies have some great advice...good luck!

Basherte
by Bronze Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 9:11 AM
1 mom liked this

You can pat his chest for him, pat his head (if he likes that kind of thing)


Anything that works to help calm him down. Sometimes when my son has a sensory overload, I allow him to just watch his favorite movie or put him in his room where it's quiet to let him calm down.

His favorite movie because there isn't anything there that he hasn't seen and it helps to calm him down when the world is just too much at that time. Seeing the same thing that he is used to and likes for a period of time really seems to dispel that overload. 

I'm not exactly sure how it works to do that, I just know that it works.

Good luck Momma.

Sending calming energies to you and your little one. Hopefully, the sensory overload doesn't last too much longer and your son can calm down.

I also squish him against the couch at times as well. That tends to help.

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SamMom912
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 8:58 PM

Check out

http://sensorysmarts.com/sensory_diet_activities.html

theres a list of TONS of activities! 

raysma07
by Bronze Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 10:11 PM
1 mom liked this

We use a weighted vest, pressure vest and brushing I have a sensory brush. I also give him jump on the bed time.  Also I have a weighted blanket he sleeps with. and a weighted exersise ball he can roll on when he wants something more quiet and relaxing!


Quoting arkansasmama08:

These suggestions are great. Have you tried weighted vests or lap pads? Jumping on a trampoline or bouncing on a ball might help too



CBMama06
by Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 10:08 PM
Sooooo sorry for the late response but yes we've tried trampolines.. I was recently told by his OT about weighted vests and backpacks... We are looking to order one

Quoting arkansasmama08:

These suggestions are great. Have you tried weighted vests or lap pads? Jumping on a trampoline or bouncing on a ball might help too
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CBMama06
by Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 10:10 PM
He loves and needs deep pressure hugs and swinging.. That seems to work outside. I was wanting to know of techniques for when he is in the class room.. But thank you for your advice!!

Quoting Momof4AEMW:

My son has SPD and responds well to deep pressure hugs, sensory toys, 'taco' roll-ups in a blanket, lining up cars, swinging, running and being tickled.  Or sometimes it is the more quiet bath, down time in his room, quiet, slow music.  It depends on what part of his system is off to what one he goes for but normally we can find one that clicks for him.  Good luck!

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