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Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

Intellectual Disability??

Posted by on Nov. 25, 2013 at 4:59 PM
  • 32 Replies

Many of us have children with several diagnosis.  How many of your kids have a child dx with intellectual disability (mental retardation if going old school) and to what degree; mild, moderate, severe?  Have you seen them go up and down on the severity scale over time or do they pretty much stay the same?

My daughters is severe, probably always will be.

My son had always been listed as mild but today was dx as moderate.  The psych said really he was always moderate per the test result number classifications, but the prior therapist just verbally said mild as she didn't want to be the one to label and hoped he'd outgrow it.  Yea, because that's oh so helpful!  She also said to expect this to be there long term, in addition to his autism we already knew would always be there.

 

by on Nov. 25, 2013 at 4:59 PM
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lancet98
by Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 5:25 PM
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Level of intellectual delay can change, as a child develops, that much is true.   But generally, it's the milder end of the spectrum where you see the changes in the level of disability, and the changes themselves, are slight.

There are exceptions of course, but it is not at all unusual to hear of a child moving from 'moderate' to 'mild' or 'mild' to 'moderate'.   As a child gets older what things they have trouble doing, usually get more obvious.

Kind of like the example given, the diagnosis of 'severe' developmental delay is more likely to be stable, it's the 'moderate' and 'mild' that tend to trade places in diagnoses.

In all honesty the intellectual delay diagnosis is a tough one, because most kids actually have some things they do well, and other things they have trouble with.   A friend who volunteers with me was stunned when one of our kids was diligently stringing beads and tying knots as part of the older kid's activities.

She came over and was so surprised, did we notice that?   He was doing a much more complex activity than his diagnosis level indicated he should be able to do????   Well????

The older volunteer/mom/chief cook and bottle washer stared at her like she had two heads.  Then she said, 'He's good at that'.

It was hard for me to get used to too at first, though.   Basically the ONLY thing that word tells you is one's best current guess about what programs might most help him right at this moment.   He's going to be doing some things more typical of 'mild' and some things more typical of 'moderate' basically.

Of course...you know...that in the 'moderate' and 'mild' group, the group designation, even the IQ test result....is a very POOR indicator of how happy, independent, and FUN a youngster or adult is.

 

Cindy18
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 6:13 PM
1 mom liked this

I absolutely LOVE how you said this!! AND really that's all that matters in the long run, now isn't it!

Quoting lancet98:


Of course...you know...that in the 'moderate' and 'mild' group, the group designation, even the IQ test result....is a very POOR indicator of how happy, independent, and FUN a youngster or adult is.



darbyakeep45
by Darby on Nov. 25, 2013 at 6:45 PM
3 moms liked this

Brady definitely has an intellectual disability...on the severe end.  But, we don't really care.  He's happy and that's all that matters to me:)

jjamom
by Michele on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:26 PM
My son's code on his IEP is ID. His score was on the high end of moderate. However, I really feel his testing was flawed and have never been satisfied with his score. Don't get me wrong, I know he has ID, but I also see so much potential. He has a phenomenal memory and shows higher thinking skills much of the time. His testing was done by a psychologist whom he had never met and quite frankly she had a bad attitude. So, I am actually thinking my son's scores may change, simply because of what I believe was an inaccurate measure the first time.

In general, I believe I recall from college psych classes that IQ should not change over time, but of course that does not mean the individual will not continue to grow and learn.
Momof4AEMW
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:38 PM
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I totally agree!  Two of my kids have ID, and I don't care at all as long as they are happy!  I just am almost more surprised at how many kids have several developmental disabilities, but then not the ID, I don't know why.  I was just curious in the groups how many did or didn't.  Seems like a lot don't unless the nature of the child's disability is along the lines with ID (like downs for example).

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Brady definitely has an intellectual disability...on the severe end.  But, we don't really care.  He's happy and that's all that matters to me:)

 

Momof4AEMW
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:42 PM

I agree with you!  We have seen 3 psychiatrist/psychologists and 1 developmental pedi in 14 months.  It is definitely luck of the draw on who you get and how much weight you can put to their input!  I hope next time he needs an evaluation you get a good one!  My son has had evals annually now for 3 years to assess this and track progress.  My daughter, obviously ID also, only had 1 eval at like 10 months or something and at 5 has not been evaluated again.  I'm not even sure when she comes due again, but she is also severe so I think it they go longer before re-evaluating.  Regardless they are amazing, happy kids!!

Thanks. Did not know IQ should not change over time.  Really hadn't thought about it either way, but guess I figured it did some as they keep testing.  Maybe it is just to get a more accurate test.

Quoting jjamom:

My son's code on his IEP is ID. His score was on the high end of moderate. However, I really feel his testing was flawed and have never been satisfied with his score. Don't get me wrong, I know he has ID, but I also see so much potential. He has a phenomenal memory and shows higher thinking skills much of the time. His testing was done by a psychologist whom he had never met and quite frankly she had a bad attitude. So, I am actually thinking my son's scores may change, simply because of what I believe was an inaccurate measure the first time.

In general, I believe I recall from college psych classes that IQ should not change over time, but of course that does not mean the individual will not continue to grow and learn.

 

Momof4AEMW
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:50 PM

most definitely! 

Quoting Cindy18:

I absolutely LOVE how you said this!! AND really that's all that matters in the long run, now isn't it!

Quoting lancet98:

 

Of course...you know...that in the 'moderate' and 'mild' group, the group designation, even the IQ test result....is a very POOR indicator of how happy, independent, and FUN a youngster or adult is.

 


 

Elyssa414
by Elyssa on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:53 PM
1 mom liked this
Elijah has a diagnosed intellectual disability. Considered moderate, (IQ 52)
Momof4AEMW
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:56 PM

I think we were 51 today, I had not paid attention to exact numbers before today's analysis.  I'm curious now to know my daughters, hers is severe. 

Quoting Elyssa414:

Elijah has a diagnosed intellectual disability. Considered moderate, (IQ 52)

 

Elyssa414
by Elyssa on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:57 PM
Yes, I'm sure Lion would be severe as well- but he hasn't been tested.

Quoting Momof4AEMW:

I think we were 51 today, I had not paid attention to exact numbers before today's analysis.  I'm curious now to know my daughters, hers is severe. 


Quoting Elyssa414:

Elijah has a diagnosed intellectual disability. Considered moderate, (IQ 52)

 

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