Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Raising Special Needs Kids Raising Special Needs Kids

1:1 Aides

Posted by on Mar. 1, 2014 at 9:54 PM
  • 34 Replies

Wondering ladies, how many of your children have 1:1 aides, and what did you have to do/say to get them?  I'm looking for good lingo that emphasizes their rights and validates their safety concerns that I can use in my IEP meetings this week and next.  All year my kids prek teacher and I have known once we got to this point of going into kinder and the big school that 2 if my children would each need their own aide.  Now this past week, we have both talked to our AEA psych, and she's like, yea that's going to be a hard one, resources, blah, blah, blah.  But here's my beef...

My daughter is non-verbal, hearing impaired, severe intellectual disability (developmentally 12-24 months), down syndrome, limited understanding, no following direction, needs help for all toileting/feeding/instruction, is a flight risk for any open door or a closed one she can sneak out of if no one is watching her - also on playground would wander away, has physical safety concerns due to a neck instability so has restrictions in play and body movements, and she's 3 ft tall, 28 lbs and is going to be in a school up to 5th grade with kids 2-4x her size.  She is not safe, period.  Completely defenseless.

My son has ASD, SPD, brain injury with moderate intellectual disability (functionally 2-3 years old), motor/speech delays, still requires help with toileting, needs someone to keep his attention on task, requires sensory breaks, has a severe peanut allergy where the school is not peanut free which means he can break out just from minimal touch (to give you an idea, my hubs decided it was a good idea to have pb toast at work for breakfast on Thursday.  After coming home 9 hours later with eating and drinking all day it only took 1 kiss to send my son into a peanut frenzy.  And no, my son's intelligence is not yet to the point where he can have any responsibility about his safety in this.).  He's also a flight risk both in school and play ground, and needs help/escape with sensory overload often.

And the new school tells me just upon reading their current IEPs that they will be their 2 most complex/challenging kids next year.  And I know there are other kids with 1:1 aides in the school, so why the heck would mine not qualify, and how do I get them.  I flat out told the psych that if they don't get approved my daughter will not be coming, and we will need to see about my son.  Thanks for the help ladies!

by on Mar. 1, 2014 at 9:54 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Linagma03
by Gold Member on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:01 PM
1 mom liked this

All I can do is give you a bump. Good Luck! I have no experience at all with this.

Lina is a velcro kid and prefers adults so there is no flight risk. Maybe getting stepped on lol. 

Cindy18
by Gold Member on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:01 PM
1 mom liked this

Please don't take this the wrong way and believe me that what I'm about to say is strictly from a safety perspective, but it sounds to me like your children need to be in a special needs school. Not in an elementary setting. 

Is that an option?

Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:07 PM

Don't worry, I don't offend easily.  I understand what you are saying, and I am in no way in denial over my kids challenges, but I also hope the best for all their abilities to shine through.  We do not have a special needs school or autism school/classroom here.  I'm Iowa, not a small town by any means, but not the up to date appropriate sn accommodations.  Iowa is still behind where sns are concerned. 

Quoting Cindy18:

Please don't take this the wrong way and believe me that what I'm about to say is strictly from a safety perspective, but it sounds to me like your children need to be in a special needs school. Not in an elementary setting. 

Is that an option?

 

Mipsy
by Chelle on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:17 PM
1 mom liked this
I dunno, maybe tell them its a liability on their end and in THEIR best interest as well to have 1:1 aides. Schools don't like being held responsible for stuff, at least thats how it has been in our experience. But honestly I can't see how they could deny it. They'd be downright stupid!

I am still new to the school thing but I don't understand how they don't have resources for sn kids. They get funding specifically for them, where's that money going?
Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:20 PM

My point EXACTLY!!!  I think they get like $52 a month or something for NT kids, and it's like $800 for SN kids.  Then spend it on my kids, you idiots and hire an aide!!!  I just keep thinking about Avonte from NY in my head.   

Quoting Mipsy: I dunno, maybe tell them its a liability on their end and in THEIR best interest as well to have 1:1 aides. Schools don't like being held responsible for stuff, at least thats how it has been in our experience. But honestly I can't see how they could deny it. They'd be downright stupid! I am still new to the school thing but I don't understand how they don't have resources for sn kids. They get funding specifically for them, where's that money going?

 

nicki.hemingway
by Nicki on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:43 PM
1 mom liked this

Our district will not do 1:1 aids at all.  Hence my ds stays home and we homeschool him.  I can't see my son being remotely safe in a classroom.  He went to our EI and had 2 accidents (was physically hurt) and got out once in a two week period.  It was ridiculous. 

Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:44 PM

Yikes!  Glad he is home safe with you!! 

Quoting nicki.hemingway:

Our district will not do 1:1 aids at all.  Hence my ds stays home and we homeschool him.  I can't see my son being remotely safe in a classroom.  He went to our EI and had 2 accidents (was physically hurt) and got out once in a two week period.  It was ridiculous. 

 

nicki.hemingway
by Nicki on Mar. 1, 2014 at 10:53 PM

My son is autistic but has an above average IQ.  They had him in an intellectual support room which was a poor fit and then on top of it completely ignored his safety issues.  It was a mess.

Quoting Momof4AEMW:

Yikes!  Glad he is home safe with you!! 

Quoting nicki.hemingway:

Our district will not do 1:1 aids at all.  Hence my ds stays home and we homeschool him.  I can't see my son being remotely safe in a classroom.  He went to our EI and had 2 accidents (was physically hurt) and got out once in a two week period.  It was ridiculous. 

 


Lilypie Fourth Birthday tickersLilypie Third Birthday tickers

Daisypath Anniversary tickersLilySlim Weight loss tickers
jjamom
by Michele on Mar. 2, 2014 at 7:50 AM
2 moms liked this
I apologize, I didn't read all of the replies, so I hope this is not redundant.

First, they CANNOT legally use the lack of resources (money) as an excuse. It is always about what the child needs. With that being said, I did see a situation locally where a Mom was being paid as her son's 1:1 because they could not find one. Mom really didn't want to do this, but there was no one else available, at least they claimed. Sounds crazy to me.

Second, be prepared if you want full inclusion because they may likely push for a more restrictive setting given their needs. If you are on Facebook, there is a group there called Inclusion for Down Syndrome that helps answer a lot of questions just like this, from parents who have been through it all.

Lastly, know IDEA inside and out.

Hugs!
Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on Mar. 2, 2014 at 7:59 AM

That would be crazy if I had to be her 1:1.   Thing is, the aide/para that she's had the last 2 years in prek wants to go with her and was hired for her originally so is tagged to her name, but prek and k-12 are different program so not sure how all that will work out.

I'm not on FB but sounds like a good read.  They will not be full inclusion at that time, they are now, but again is prek and much more free play time in current setting.  It would be more 1/2 and 1/2 to give them time for the peer modeling and socializaton and the rest to work on their needs.  Eventually I think my son will be able to do full gen ed, but only if he's kept in there some of the day now to get use to it and they get the right approaches to working with him during his other time.  So far I can not get them to address his sensory needs with therapy (teacher and I are both fighting for it), and if it is not addressed you might as well shut down his whole day.  But if current teacher does it (not her job, should be ot) then he is just a dream in class.  Love how school board does not listen to parents.

I do need to read IDEA before our meetings start this week!  Thanks for the reminder! 

Quoting jjamom: I apologize, I didn't read all of the replies, so I hope this is not redundant. First, they CANNOT legally use the lack of resources (money) as an excuse. It is always about what the child needs. With that being said, I did see a situation locally where a Mom was being paid as her son's 1:1 because they could not find one. Mom really didn't want to do this, but there was no one else available, at least they claimed. Sounds crazy to me. Second, be prepared if you want full inclusion because they may likely push for a more restrictive setting given their needs. If you are on Facebook, there is a group there called Inclusion for Down Syndrome that helps answer a lot of questions just like this, from parents who have been through it all. Lastly, know IDEA inside and out. Hugs!

 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN