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Advice with hearing aids?

Posted by on May. 4, 2014 at 4:43 PM
  • 12 Replies

My oldest son is six years old, and we found out a month ago that he has bilateral sensorineural hearing loss... The ear specialist thinks his hearing loss may be genetic, as I have a great aunt who was born with it, but the specialist wants to do a genetic panel to see if he has markers for it.... He was already fitted for hearing aids, and he has an appointment on the 8th to get them. He picked out the style and the colors for them. Do any of you mamas have children with hearing aids? If so, do you have any tips? I've talked to my son about them, but he doesn't seem to quite understand that they will be something he has to wear on a daily basis. His hearing loss is moderate if that helps any. Thanks in advance :)

by on May. 4, 2014 at 4:43 PM
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Linagma03
by Platinum Member on May. 4, 2014 at 5:56 PM
1 mom liked this

Lina has a mild/moderate bilateral hearing loss also. She was diagnosed at 5 and got her hearing aids then. She got to pick the color and all too. I thought she would have a problem leaving them in but since she was able to hear she left them in. 

2 things that have worked for me.

1) have them lock the volume control on the hearing aid or he'll have a hard time hearing after he finds it and begins to mess around. My audiologist talked to me about that and we decided until she was cognitively old enough we'd leave it locked at the volume that works.

2) ask if they have rolls of double sided tape. My clinic carries that and I get a roll when we go in and it lasts us a year or better.  You cut a piece of tape and place it on the back of the hearing aid and attach it to the side of the head. It works for us because she has strangely shaped ears and wears glasses. The hearing aids won't be pushed off by the arms of her glasses and they won't fall over her ears when she is playing. 

As for cleaning them they will show you how to use the little tool to clear the mold of wax. About once a month I take an alcohol wipe and gently wipe off the mold to get all the oil & wax residue off make sure that you dry them right after wiping them. The body of the hearing aid I wipe off with the alcohol wipe when the plastic feels sticky from the tape. Most of the time the tape comes off with no sticky residue. You don't want to wipe either one down often when it is really needed. 

The battery tester that comes in the kit isn't usually the best at telling you when the batteries are really low. What I did with that is test them every day, then I know where the battery is on the meter so when she tells me that it was beeping (dying) I know now when the lines are at a certain place even if it is supposed to mean that there is 80% left that it really means CHANGE the battery so I don't get a call from the school to come change the batteries. If I shut them off every night then the batteries are lasting 3-4 weeks. I also change both batteries not just one that way I know they are both good. 

I hope that this is helpful for you. After you've dealt with them for a little while it will be a breeze.

Cindy18
by on May. 4, 2014 at 6:04 PM

Great advice!

Quoting Linagma03:

Lina has a mild/moderate bilateral hearing loss also. She was diagnosed at 5 and got her hearing aids then. She got to pick the color and all too. I thought she would have a problem leaving them in but since she was able to hear she left them in. 

2 things that have worked for me.

1) have them lock the volume control on the hearing aid or he'll have a hard time hearing after he finds it and begins to mess around. My audiologist talked to me about that and we decided until she was cognitively old enough we'd leave it locked at the volume that works.

2) ask if they have rolls of double sided tape. My clinic carries that and I get a roll when we go in and it lasts us a year or better.  You cut a piece of tape and place it on the back of the hearing aid and attach it to the side of the head. It works for us because she has strangely shaped ears and wears glasses. The hearing aids won't be pushed off by the arms of her glasses and they won't fall over her ears when she is playing. 

As for cleaning them they will show you how to use the little tool to clear the mold of wax. About once a month I take an alcohol wipe and gently wipe off the mold to get all the oil & wax residue off make sure that you dry them right after wiping them. The body of the hearing aid I wipe off with the alcohol wipe when the plastic feels sticky from the tape. Most of the time the tape comes off with no sticky residue. You don't want to wipe either one down often when it is really needed. 

The battery tester that comes in the kit isn't usually the best at telling you when the batteries are really low. What I did with that is test them every day, then I know where the battery is on the meter so when she tells me that it was beeping (dying) I know now when the lines are at a certain place even if it is supposed to mean that there is 80% left that it really means CHANGE the battery so I don't get a call from the school to come change the batteries. If I shut them off every night then the batteries are lasting 3-4 weeks. I also change both batteries not just one that way I know they are both good. 

I hope that this is helpful for you. After you've dealt with them for a little while it will be a breeze.


Linagma03
by Platinum Member on May. 4, 2014 at 6:12 PM

Thanks! I wound up learning some by trial and error and some from the Audiologist who has been a dream. 

Quoting Cindy18:

Great advice!

Quoting Linagma03:

Lina has a mild/moderate bilateral hearing loss also. She was diagnosed at 5 and got her hearing aids then. She got to pick the color and all too. I thought she would have a problem leaving them in but since she was able to hear she left them in. 

2 things that have worked for me.

1) have them lock the volume control on the hearing aid or he'll have a hard time hearing after he finds it and begins to mess around. My audiologist talked to me about that and we decided until she was cognitively old enough we'd leave it locked at the volume that works.

2) ask if they have rolls of double sided tape. My clinic carries that and I get a roll when we go in and it lasts us a year or better.  You cut a piece of tape and place it on the back of the hearing aid and attach it to the side of the head. It works for us because she has strangely shaped ears and wears glasses. The hearing aids won't be pushed off by the arms of her glasses and they won't fall over her ears when she is playing. 

As for cleaning them they will show you how to use the little tool to clear the mold of wax. About once a month I take an alcohol wipe and gently wipe off the mold to get all the oil & wax residue off make sure that you dry them right after wiping them. The body of the hearing aid I wipe off with the alcohol wipe when the plastic feels sticky from the tape. Most of the time the tape comes off with no sticky residue. You don't want to wipe either one down often when it is really needed. 

The battery tester that comes in the kit isn't usually the best at telling you when the batteries are really low. What I did with that is test them every day, then I know where the battery is on the meter so when she tells me that it was beeping (dying) I know now when the lines are at a certain place even if it is supposed to mean that there is 80% left that it really means CHANGE the battery so I don't get a call from the school to come change the batteries. If I shut them off every night then the batteries are lasting 3-4 weeks. I also change both batteries not just one that way I know they are both good. 

I hope that this is helpful for you. After you've dealt with them for a little while it will be a breeze.


darbyakeep45
by Darby on May. 4, 2014 at 6:40 PM
1 mom liked this

Good luck mama!

Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on May. 4, 2014 at 8:35 PM
1 mom liked this

My daughter hates hers, and pulls them out all the time!!  She is 5.5 and had them since 8 months old.  But she has intellectual/developmental disabilities on top of the hearing loss, so I would not use her as your comparison.  Good luck!   

MonstersMomma26
by on May. 5, 2014 at 1:48 AM
1 mom liked this
I second the suggestion to have the volume locked. Our son is 2 1/2 and has worn hearing aids for 2 years. His volume will stay locked until he's old enough to not mess with it accidentally. He has bilateral sensorineural hearing loss at the severe/profound level. What brand and model hearing aids did you go with? Right now, we have oticon safari aids but are getting new phonak skyQ UPS this summer to up his hearing. Once he starts wearing them, don't be surprised when he gets frustrated. Start him out wearing them for a few hours at a time and gradually build it up. Unless he takes to them great. If he doesn't have an issue, you got lucky and you should celebrate. Don't get discouraged or frustrated if he doesn't hit it off with them right away. It'll click eventually. If it doesnt, yall learn ASL so that he has something to fall back on. Our son uses ASL more than anything and if he chooses not to wear his aids down the road, we still have full communication. If there's stuff you're unsure about, talk to your audiologist. Don't be afraid to ask seemingly stupid questions. I had to ask lots of dumb questions at the beginning because it was brand new to me. Don't worry, they've heard it all. Lol. Good luck!
Whisper85
by Member on May. 5, 2014 at 9:33 AM

When we were looking at the hearing aids, and she ordered them we talked to her about the volume control. My son loves to play with anything electronic. I'm so glad we thought to ask about that, so she ordered them where the volume can't be adjusted. I am hoping that they will become part of his routine, and it won't be too bad of an adjustment. 

I'm worried that something might happen to them at school, we did order something that hooks to the hearing aids, and it hooks to his shirt. 

Thank you so much for your response! This is all new to me, and we didn't expect it! They said his hearing has slowly progressed since birth, which is probably why it wasn't caught at birth.

Quoting Linagma03:

Lina has a mild/moderate bilateral hearing loss also. She was diagnosed at 5 and got her hearing aids then. She got to pick the color and all too. I thought she would have a problem leaving them in but since she was able to hear she left them in. 

2 things that have worked for me.

1) have them lock the volume control on the hearing aid or he'll have a hard time hearing after he finds it and begins to mess around. My audiologist talked to me about that and we decided until she was cognitively old enough we'd leave it locked at the volume that works.

2) ask if they have rolls of double sided tape. My clinic carries that and I get a roll when we go in and it lasts us a year or better.  You cut a piece of tape and place it on the back of the hearing aid and attach it to the side of the head. It works for us because she has strangely shaped ears and wears glasses. The hearing aids won't be pushed off by the arms of her glasses and they won't fall over her ears when she is playing. 

As for cleaning them they will show you how to use the little tool to clear the mold of wax. About once a month I take an alcohol wipe and gently wipe off the mold to get all the oil & wax residue off make sure that you dry them right after wiping them. The body of the hearing aid I wipe off with the alcohol wipe when the plastic feels sticky from the tape. Most of the time the tape comes off with no sticky residue. You don't want to wipe either one down often when it is really needed. 

The battery tester that comes in the kit isn't usually the best at telling you when the batteries are really low. What I did with that is test them every day, then I know where the battery is on the meter so when she tells me that it was beeping (dying) I know now when the lines are at a certain place even if it is supposed to mean that there is 80% left that it really means CHANGE the battery so I don't get a call from the school to come change the batteries. If I shut them off every night then the batteries are lasting 3-4 weeks. I also change both batteries not just one that way I know they are both good. 

I hope that this is helpful for you. After you've dealt with them for a little while it will be a breeze.


letstalk747
by Ruby Member on May. 5, 2014 at 9:34 AM
1 mom liked this

my son wears aides for 10 years now , at 1st i told him he needs these to hear better it never was much of a problem thank God.my son has a high-frequency hearing loss so he cant hear all letters and the sounds they make to put words together.

is your son going to have ear molds ?

Whisper85
by Member on May. 5, 2014 at 9:41 AM

We actually had that disabled while we were ordering them. We told the audiologist our concerns with him playing with electronics and such... We went with the sensei oticon. The audiologist said that his hearing loss isn't too bad, but he wants to do a genetic panel and future testing to see if it progresses any. 

I will try having him wear them for a little bit, and slowly adjust the time. Once things become apart of his routine he will insist on it. So I hope the transition won't be too bad. 

Thank you so much! 

Quoting MonstersMomma26: I second the suggestion to have the volume locked. Our son is 2 1/2 and has worn hearing aids for 2 years. His volume will stay locked until he's old enough to not mess with it accidentally. He has bilateral sensorineural hearing loss at the severe/profound level. What brand and model hearing aids did you go with? Right now, we have oticon safari aids but are getting new phonak skyQ UPS this summer to up his hearing. Once he starts wearing them, don't be surprised when he gets frustrated. Start him out wearing them for a few hours at a time and gradually build it up. Unless he takes to them great. If he doesn't have an issue, you got lucky and you should celebrate. Don't get discouraged or frustrated if he doesn't hit it off with them right away. It'll click eventually. If it doesnt, yall learn ASL so that he has something to fall back on. Our son uses ASL more than anything and if he chooses not to wear his aids down the road, we still have full communication. If there's stuff you're unsure about, talk to your audiologist. Don't be afraid to ask seemingly stupid questions. I had to ask lots of dumb questions at the beginning because it was brand new to me. Don't worry, they've heard it all. Lol. Good luck!


Whisper85
by Member on May. 5, 2014 at 9:43 AM

I hope that my son will be the same way! 

Yes, they said that until he is older he will have to have them. 

Quoting letstalk747:

my son wears aides for 10 years now , at 1st i told him he needs these to hear better it never was much of a problem thank God.my son has a high-frequency hearing loss so he cant hear all letters and the sounds they make to put words together.

is your son going to have ear molds ?


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