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Needing Some School Work Help

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2016 at 6:26 AM
  • 6 Replies

My daughter is almost 9 yrs old. She has anxiety n ADD,she is like me n bad at Math. They are doing their Xs tables is there a way I can help her learn them easier for her to understand instead of adding say(6+6+6+6+6 & etc)? She gets overwhelmed when she has to do Math. If you have any tips please share with me!!!


Thanks for your time

by on Apr. 8, 2016 at 6:26 AM
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Replies (1-6):
jjamom
by Michele on Apr. 8, 2016 at 8:06 AM
2 moms liked this
Honestly, I am old school when it comes to times tables. I think memorization is the way to go. It's good to understand the idea that it's repeated addition, but isn't it just easier to know 6x7=42? I'd do flash cards and a multiplication chart. My two oldest used to do math minute each morning at school to see how many they could do in a minute. Practice, practice, practice. Just my honest opinion.
MamaLauri
by Silver Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 9:13 AM
1 mom liked this

Many children struggle with memorization of Multiplication and Division Tables, especially visual learners, which make up 60% of the population. Kids with ADD are usually visual learners.

Visual learners need to understand the concepts first. Instead of learning 288 discreet multiplication facts that do not increase conceptual knowledge, you can learn the multiples sequences in song (http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/Bookshelf.html#mathBooks) and discover the 10 multiple pattern rules, increasing conceptual knowledge. Ten rules build on concepts is much easier to learn than 288. The songs make it fun.

For example http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/Songs2/html/MrH-2-3-4.html is the sing along teaching multiplication for 2, 3, 4, and http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/Songs2/html/Mult-2.html teaches the pattern for 2s. On each song page, there is a ling to the pattern page.

Oh, the mobile/tablet version will not be out for a couple of months. Right now it is best with a laptop.

Jaimielorai
by Member on Apr. 10, 2016 at 6:51 AM
1 mom liked this

I tutor special needs kids especially in math, I had my son knock it out in 2nd grade.  The best way it to teach the trick, such as song, and remembering rules, example look at what you wrote, if your child has addition down then take the (6 +6 and turn them into 12 +12)  have her add all them up, this works more or less as a check if she does not grasp the memory of it. However our kids tend to have great memories so using charts in front of them gives them confidence so they can check.   I even included the school house songs.I also recommend all parents look into Pinterest, they have teachers that have stuff loaded for kids with special needs.  I have found Australia has some of the best special needs sites!

https://vimeo.com/67985069

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnx6r9S_SJ7I_Msib-Nj-zgROaicmyqA8


http://math.about.com/cs/multiplication/a/multws.htm

http://picklebums.com/learn-times-tables/

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Multiplication-Facts-934466

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Times-Tables-Keyring-292949

jjamom
by Michele on Apr. 10, 2016 at 4:51 PM
1 mom liked this
These ladies all bring up some good ideas, the best approach really just depends on where your child's strengths lie.

Does she have a good memory?
Is she a visual, auditory, kinesthetic learner?
Does she need to understand the "why"or "how" in order to grasp a concept?
hotmomofmakayla
by Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 6:35 PM

She doesn't have great memory. I think she is a visual n auditory learner? Plus we are trying get her to asks for help when she needs it instead guessing at the answers. She feels like she has to been like the others kids who doesn't have to asks for help.


Quoting jjamom: These ladies all bring up some good ideas, the best approach really just depends on where your child's strengths lie. Does she have a good memory? Is she a visual, auditory, kinesthetic learner? Does she need to understand the "why"or "how" in order to grasp a concept?


jjamom
by Michele on Apr. 11, 2016 at 8:46 PM
1 mom liked this
I can understand her reluctance to ask for help when needed. No kid wants to stick out, or be the "only one" who doesn't understand. That is actually one of my son's IEP goals right now. He will just not do the work if he doesn't understand. So, at the IEP meeting we brainstormed ideas for ways to help him ask for help, not necessarily just verbal. One idea was a red, square card that he could place on the corner of his desk when he needs help. The teacher knows to check periodically while he is supposed to be doing independent work. That might be a way she could get more help, without calling a lot of attention to it. I would talk to the teacher and come up with a way that might work for both your daughter and the teacher. Also, the teacher might have some good ideas or some resources or activities you could do at home to work on it.

Quoting hotmomofmakayla:

She doesn't have great memory. I think she is a visual n auditory learner? Plus we are trying get her to asks for help when she needs it instead guessing at the answers. She feels like she has to been like the others kids who doesn't have to asks for help.

Quoting jjamom: These ladies all bring up some good ideas, the best approach really just depends on where your child's strengths lie.

Does she have a good memory?
Is she a visual, auditory, kinesthetic learner?
Does she need to understand the "why"or "how" in order to grasp a concept?

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