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Inducing Lactation so I can breast-feed

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Has anybody induced lactation so they could breast-feed their adopted child. About four months ago I started to lactate. I looked into inducing lactation and started the pumping process but now that I've started pumping I find that I'm not lactating any longer. We have not been matched with the baby but I thought if I got a head start that maybe I could stock up on my breast milk or maybe even donate my milk to somebody else who needs it right now. Does anybody have a advice about inducing lactation?

by on Jan. 9, 2013 at 12:45 AM
Replies (11-13):
maggiemom2000
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 3:16 PM

Isn't it crazy that doctors don't know about these things?

I just want to calrify for others who may read this that it is still possible with a last minute/unexpected placement. A lot of people think you have to have time in advance to "prepare" but the truth is that you do not (that is one way to do it, but not the only way).

I was able to induce lactation and breastfeed my adopted DD and we had no warning at all! We went from a meeting to discuss the possibility of adopting her to taking her home in less than 24 hrs. We hardly had enough time to go buy a car seat let alone prepare for lactation!

I worte abou it here http://thebreastfeedingmother.blogspot.com/2010/10/i-always-knew-i-wanted-to-breastfeed-my.html

Quoting Mandi812:

My husband wanted me to do this. I even asked a doc about it, and he had no clue forced lactation for feeding a adopted child could be done, lol.  you should of seen the look on his face.

But when it came to it, we didnt get to because we had a last min placement.


2mamas
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 10:51 AM

Do you have any information on the nutritional value of milk that is induced vs milk that is produced after giving birth?  I understand that biological moms produce milk that varies with the needs of the baby, how does this work when inducing lactation?

Any info or leads would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

nicole

 

 

maggiemom2000
by Bronze Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 11:44 AM

To my knowledge there has never been any research conducted on the nutritional differences between breastmilk from adoptive moms and bio moms. We do have some evidence on how the body tailors the milk to each child.

The mother's body actually responds to baby's saliva to help to tailor the milk to meet baby's needs. This is one way the mom's body "knows" what antibodies to make. Certain things, like antibodies, are more concentrated when mom is producing less milk. So if mom is only making a partial milk supply, baby is still getting the same "dose" of antibodies as if there was a full milk supply (this happens naturally during the weaning process).

This article cites some of the research: http://thebreastfeedingmother.blogspot.com/2012/07/are-there-differences-between.html

"Antibodies are blood proteins produced in response to substances that the body recognizes as alien, such as bacteria and viruses. Close physical contact with your baby helps your body create antibodies to germs in his environment. When you breastfeed directly, your body creates antibodies in response to cues from your baby’s saliva and other secretions. After exposure to new germs, your body can make targeted antibodiesavailable to your baby within the next several hours (Chirco 2008) (Cantini 2008). While a bottle of milk from a previous date will provide your baby with immune factors, it will not contain antibodies to germs he was exposed to today."

This is an article on some of the benefits of adoptive breastfeeding: http://thebreastfeedingmother.blogspot.com/2011/04/adoptive-breastfeeding-what-are.html

I always figured any human milk would be better than an artificial substitute!

Quoting 2mamas:

Do you have any information on the nutritional value of milk that is induced vs milk that is produced after giving birth?  I understand that biological moms produce milk that varies with the needs of the baby, how does this work when inducing lactation?

Any info or leads would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

nicole




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