Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Adoptive Moms Adoptive Moms

Need a bit of advice about private adoption

Posted by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:33 PM
  • 6 Replies
Me and my dh are going to peruse a private adoption in the next year or two.
Has anyone gone through private adoption any advice, tips, stories , etc?
Also do we get an adoption lawyer 1st or find a birth mother 1st?
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:33 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-6):
AngelNecole
by New Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:38 PM
Bump
FlyingMommy747
by Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:39 PM

We did a private adoption, and advertised through ParentProfiles.com.  Do you know if your state requires an agency?  Ours did not, but we did contact an attorney first to make sure everything is in place.  Once a BM is found, it could be very quick.

AngelNecole
by New Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:44 PM
I'm not sure, we live in Georgia. I didn't know they had websites for finding birth moms. Thanks for telling me about it!


Quoting FlyingMommy747:

We did a private adoption, and advertised through ParentProfiles.com.  Do you know if your state requires an agency?  Ours did not, but we did contact an attorney first to make sure everything is in place.  Once a BM is found, it could be very quick.


mcginnisc
by Claire on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:55 PM

I'm in Georgia as well.. we adopted Internationally, but I did a quick search for you and this is what I found regarding GA Adoption Laws: 

Georgia Adoption Laws

Each state maintains its own adoption policies, so the process can vary considerably for families, from state to state. Learn all about the legal guidelines for families adopting in Georgia, whether you’re adopting a newborn through domestic, private adoption, an infant or older child from U.S. foster care adoption, or an infant, toddler, or older child through international adoption. Find answers to the most common questions about Georgia adoptions, as well as related articles from the AF archives.

Ready to find a Georgia adoption agency, adoption lawyer, or adoption doctor? Return to the main Georgia Adoptions page.


WHO CAN ADOPT?
Any adult, including a foster parent, may adopt as long as s/he is 25 years or older or married and living with his/her spouse, at least 10 years older than the adoptee, a resident of Georgia for 6 months or more, and financially, physically, and mentally prepared to become an adoptive parent.


DOMESTIC ADOPTION
Can adoptive parents advertise for birthparents?
No.

Can out-of-state residents finalize an adoption?
No.

Can adopting parents use an adoption facilitator or another paid intermediary?
Yes, but adopting parents may only use a child-placing agency that is recognized by the state.

What birthparent expenses may be paid, and in what time period?
Medical, legal, with affidavit. Reasonable living expenses if licensed agency adoption.

Is there a putative father registry?
Yes.

When can consent to adoption be granted?
In agency cases, 24 hours after birth. In private cases, any time after birth.

When does consent become irrevocable? If consent is revoked, is return to birthparent automatic?
10 days after signing; if the 10th day is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, then period extends to next business day. Return generally automatic.

Are post-adoption contact agreements legally enforceable?
Not addressed in state statutes.


INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION
Is a foreign adoption decree automatically recognized by the state?
Yes, a decree of court by any court within or outside of the U.S. is recognized by Georgia as long as the adoption decree is issued under due process of law.

Can parents readopt in this state? Is it mandatory? 
Yes, adopting parents may readopt in Georgia as long as the foreign adoption decree is entered by a Georgia court, and the child is granted a visa from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

When will a U.S. birth certificate be issued?
 The State Registrar will issue a birth certificate upon receipt of the adoption report from the court decreeing the adoption and proof of the child's date and place of birth.


ADOPTION FROM FOSTER CARE
Are adoption subsidies available? When do they start and how long do they last?
Yes, subsidies are available for a special needs child, who is defined as having at least one of the following: has a physical, mental, or emotional condition as diagnosed by a professional, member of a sibling group of 2 or more children being placed together, has been in the care of a public or private agency or a foster parent for more than twenty-four months in a row. In addition, the child must be in the custody of the Georgia Dept. of Human Services. Subsidies start at adoption placement.

Where can I learn more about the process of adopting a child from foster care in Georgia?
http://dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov/portal/site/DHS-DFCS/menuitem.5d32235bb09bde9a50c8798dd03036a0/?vgnextoid=036a2b48d9a4ff00VgnVCM100000bf01010aRCRD


GEORGIA ADOPTION UNIT
Georgia Department of Human Resources
Division of Family and Children Services
2 Peachtree Street NW, 85th Floor, Suite 460
Atlanta, GA 30311
(404) 657-3550
vahenson@dhr.state.ga.us 
http://dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov/portal/site/DHS-DFCS/

 


Claire


" I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me." Philippians 4:13 

2Gs
by Wendy on Apr. 26, 2013 at 11:33 PM

Double check the date on those GA laws because I do see prospective parents listed on parent profiles. That is how we adopted and it went very fast and it was very affordable.  If I were you I'd email those couples and find out how their process has gone so far.  Most waiting couples don't mind talking about their process.

sak9645i
by Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 7:22 PM

1.  Remember that you will need a homestudy by a social worker licensed to conduct homestudies.  That really should be your first order of business, so you are sure that you are approvable.

2.  Many people believe in retaining an attorney early in the process, if they are pursuing private adoption.  The reason is that there are a lot of scammers out there, and many people refer callers to their attorney for vetting, before agreeing to work with a specific pregnant woman.

3.  An attorney is also helpful, even before a pregnant woman is identified, in telling you what sorts of recruitment can be done in your state.  Some states do not allow advertising, for example.

4.  Once you identify a possible pregnant woman, you really need an attorney to be sure that you pay only legitimate birthmother expenses, as identified by your state.

5.  You actually SHOULD offer to pay for an attorney and a counselor for the expectant woman, if you can possibly do so and if she cannot afford them.  The court will look favorably on such an offer, as it means that you are serious about helping  the prospective birthmother to be sure her decisions about placing, open adoption, etc. are what she really wants and to be sure that her rights are protected.  Both actions also help prevent trouble down the road.

6.  You will need an attorney to handle your finalization and make sure everything is done legally and ethically.

 

Sharon

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)