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Open suggestion box, what would you like your boss to do for you?

Posted by on Jan. 15, 2012 at 10:33 PM
  • 19 Replies

Yay, so Ive got a new task for work. Well its not new but I feel its actually a real responsibility now. My mother in law told me I can come up with some new things to add in the employee hand books (as can everyone else). The old ones are okay but I think the employees need to get just a little bit more. Ive been procrastinating a bit but I came up with a few just for the time being but Im looking for a few ideas.

1.) 7 weeks unpaid maternity leave is the current amount we give. I would like to try suggesting 10 weeks, 5 paid (half of your normally wage, up to $15 dollars an hour) and the other 5 unpaid. We only have about 10 pregnant women a year so I think its in the budget.

2.) Family leave for men or SOs. I think 3 weeks should be fine. Theirs would be unpaid though

EDIT: YOU CAN ALREADY TAKE 12 IN A 12 MONTH PERIOD :]. NO NEED FOR THOSE TWO

3.) Paid pumping breaks. I was thinking of trying to help out the couple moms who do pump. I think it takes like 20 minutes right X 3 breaks so an hour all together? We currently do unpaid but I was thinking about paid. Now they would have to be doing something to earn the money (trying to keep everything as equal as possible). Im not sure what, so any suggestion would be nice.

3.) Time off for school functions. I was thinking about a point system. Every time you report to work on time you get a point. Each point equals .25 minutes. You can cash out your points when you need extra lunch time or need to come in late. This would benefit everyone. The max points you can earn is 100 a year.

Any suggestions?

We recently closed a furniture gallery. 15 people were laid off. We have the extra money in the budget so Im trying to turned a messed up situation into something that can turn out a little good. My in laws are about maximising profit but they really do care about their employees.

by on Jan. 15, 2012 at 10:33 PM
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Replies (1-10):
NDADanceMom
by on Jan. 15, 2012 at 10:48 PM

 DO men and women get different family leave leagally? I dont think you can do that.  I think you have to offer the same for adoptions too. 

I dont get this list at all.... How often does a woman need to pump?  THat seems like a ton of pumping.  Once a day should do it during a work day. You dont have to pump in the night right?  You can go a day.  Time off for school functions?  They say no now?  Never had a job like that.  Who administers that point system?  That doesnt seem financially reasonable.  It would be cheaper to just let them leave occasionally.   

I suggest allowing employees to donate leave time.  WHen I was teaching one of my coworkers had a husband that died.  We all donated a week of our vacation time so she could take the rest of the year off.

cassnadrajones
by on Jan. 15, 2012 at 11:03 PM

II think you legally can give the different times. Its only a requirement for women, not men.

Ive never BFed so Im guessing like once every 2 or 3 hours. So about 2 or 3 times.

I was thinking about the point system because its harder for the "basic" employees to leave for a school function or other activity. As of now they have to schedule 2 weeks in advance (unless its an extreme emergency). The extra time is not paid and it does discourage a lot of people from taking a few minutes for important things like school plays and such. Its hard to let people just leave because of the type of jobs some employees have.

I love the donating time suggestion. I think that might be better than the points thing. Now that you break it down, it does seem just a tad confusing.

Quoting NDADanceMom:

 DO men and women get different family leave leagally? I dont think you can do that.  I think you have to offer the same for adoptions too. 

I dont get this list at all.... How often does a woman need to pump?  THat seems like a ton of pumping.  Once a day should do it during a work day. You dont have to pump in the night right?  You can go a day.  Time off for school functions?  They say no now?  Never had a job like that.  Who administers that point system?  That doesnt seem financially reasonable.  It would be cheaper to just let them leave occasionally.   

I suggest allowing employees to donate leave time.  WHen I was teaching one of my coworkers had a husband that died.  We all donated a week of our vacation time so she could take the rest of the year off.


ekralevich
by on Jan. 15, 2012 at 11:08 PM

Doesn't the law state you have to give 6 weeks paid maternity leave if you have X amount of employees?  FMLA I think?  I was a breastfeeding mom and I wouldn't think giving paid time to pump is fair.  Give them the time the need, but off the clock.  Why should everyone else not get paid breaks because they are not breastfeeding?  It's a little sexiest too.

ekralevich
by on Jan. 15, 2012 at 11:10 PM

Also, what about people without kids?  How do they get to use their points.  Just for time off?  Look at the FMLA I think the other poster was right about the times off for maternity and paternity leave.  Or at least they have rules that do have to be followed.

Family and Medical Leave Act

Overview

The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Eligible employees are entitled to:

  • Twelve workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:
    • the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
    • the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
    • to care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
    • a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
    • any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;” or
  • Twenty-six workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered servicemember with a serious injury or illness who is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin to the employee (military caregiver leave).
cassnadrajones
by on Jan. 16, 2012 at 6:52 AM

You do not have to pay for maternity leave but simply hold a spot. I think the minimum you can give is six weeks. You are not required to give family leave to men. 

People without children can just take the time off. I wanted to give paid pumping breaks, but I was asking for a job the women could take while pumping. I was thinking about typing papers or something. They would have to be earning the money, but at least they wouldn't have to take a pay cut. 

Quoting ekralevich:

Also, what about people without kids?  How do they get to use their points.  Just for time off?  Look at the FMLA I think the other poster was right about the times off for maternity and paternity leave.  Or at least they have rules that do have to be followed.

Family and Medical Leave Act

Overview

The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Eligible employees are entitled to:

  • Twelve workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:
    • the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
    • the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
    • to care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
    • a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
    • any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;” or
  • Twenty-six workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered servicemember with a serious injury or illness who is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin to the employee (military caregiver leave).


NDADanceMom
by on Jan. 16, 2012 at 7:04 AM

 So if a single man adopts a newborn he doesnt get FML?  I really think you are wrong about that.  Granted I was a teacher so the union set some of our rules and they are usually more generous and my husband is an executive in a large company so he also gets more perks but we BOTH get 6 weeks paid.  I get a year to take off and am guaranteed an equivalent job back when im done (not my identical job).  You cant make a rule for men only or women only.  I know that. 

I suggest you just break down days off by 1/2 and 1/4 days so employees use them for school events if they want.  Be more flexible on the 2 week thing.  If you are busy they may be told no if it is less than 2 weeks away but they dont have to give 2 weeks to get time off in a slow time.

cassnadrajones
by on Jan. 16, 2012 at 7:49 AM


Quoting NDADanceMom:

 So if a single man adopts a newborn he doesnt get FML?  I really think you are wrong about that.  Granted I was a teacher so the union set some of our rules and they are usually more generous and my husband is an executive in a large company so he also gets more perks but we BOTH get 6 weeks paid.  I get a year to take off and am guaranteed an equivalent job back when im done (not my identical job).  You cant make a rule for men only or women only.  I know that. 

I suggest you just break down days off by 1/2 and 1/4 days so employees use them for school events if they want.  Be more flexible on the 2 week thing.  If you are busy they may be told no if it is less than 2 weeks away but they dont have to give 2 weeks to get time off in a slow time.


Yes, you do get time off if you adopt. I dont think we have yet to have someone adopt so I wasnt sure what the rules are for that. I looked it up and I kept seeing you can take up to 12 weeks under FMLA, but 3 months doesn't seem right. I have yet to see that kind of time given. My husband only got two months and he is their son. I will speak to my in laws about it but I know right now if you can take a 3 month break, there is no way in hell they will pay for it. So I can just scratch that one.

I think I'll just go with 10 sick days off, you can borrow from that time as you please. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Jan. 16, 2012 at 7:50 AM
:)
ekralevich
by on Jan. 16, 2012 at 8:12 AM

It doesn't say men are excluded.  I understand it's unpaid, it's up to the company to pay of they want.  But, if you only give it to moms that's sexist isn't it?  Could that open you company up for a lawsuit?  I'm brain storming.  

Quoting cassnadrajones:

You do not have to pay for maternity leave but simply hold a spot. I think the minimum you can give is six weeks. You are not required to give family leave to men. 

People without children can just take the time off. I wanted to give paid pumping breaks, but I was asking for a job the women could take while pumping. I was thinking about typing papers or something. They would have to be earning the money, but at least they wouldn't have to take a pay cut. 

Quoting ekralevich:

Also, what about people without kids?  How do they get to use their points.  Just for time off?  Look at the FMLA I think the other poster was right about the times off for maternity and paternity leave.  Or at least they have rules that do have to be followed.


Family and Medical Leave Act

Overview

The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Eligible employees are entitled to:

  • Twelve workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:
    • the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
    • the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
    • to care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
    • a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
    • any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;” or
  • Twenty-six workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered servicemember with a serious injury or illness who is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin to the employee (military caregiver leave).



Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Jan. 16, 2012 at 8:13 AM
bump:)
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