Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

How the heck can you homeschool your kids when you can't write a coherent sentence yourself?

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

Aaargh! It annoys me to no end. Yes, as parents you should have a say in your child's education, but that does not mean that you should homeschool if you are barely educated yourself. I just wish there was some sort of accountability when it comes to homeschooling.

"We home school 'em. I teach the big ones, and the big ones teach the little ones, but nobody taught me, so the whole thing is an exercise in futility. " Cletus

Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 29, 2012 at 4:15 AM
Replies (1301-1310):
bmw29
by spitfire_bobbie on Apr. 30, 2012 at 10:38 PM
1 mom liked this
Standing ovation over here!

Quoting Anonymous:



I have volunteered in my children's school for 3 years. This year I am the PTO president. I am in the school several days a week and have great relationships with their teachers and the staff. I think the state and the school district are both responsible for not doing the best they can for my kids. My son is in second grade yet his reading and math skills are on a 5th-6th grade level. This is according to THEIR tests. But instead of nurturing that intelligence, he's given busy work, told to go read on his own (books that I get him from the public library, not that the school are providing to challenge his skills), and told he can't do more than his so called peers.

He was tested for gifted and talented last year and that test showed him to be of average intelligence. The school district insisted he was a high achiever not one of high intelligence. I didn't pursue it since they didn't do a single thing for the gifted and talented program anyhow, they just identified the students. Fast forward a few months when he started second grade. His teacher is adamant that I need to request he gets retested. She as the teacher can't request it....oh no, I as a parent have to. So I did. Wow, he must have become an overnight genius because his IQ jumped to 130 and 98th percentile. Another test I don't put a lot of faith in, because I didn't need it to tell me what I already knew.

I have put so many hours into their school, and love that I've helped other students who are struggling. But test after test after test is what our public school is becoming. Dibels for math and reading, Istep, I-read, AR tests, on and on and on. They teach for the tests not for actual learning.

Next school year, I'm going to dedicate all the hours I volunteer to help other people's children, and homeschool my own. They can excel where their minds take them, and I'm intelligent enough to make sure they achieve in the other important areas that they need to be successful.

Moving is not an option, and there aren't quality private schools nearby that don't do the exact same things the public schools do. The school's hands may be tied on the curriculum and pacing of subjects, but mine are not.

And FYI, Michiana is a generic area term for northern Indiana and southern Michigan. Michigan standards may be that low, but our Indiana school has higher expectations for students finishing kindergarten.

I am also fully capable of writing a complete sentence and with proper spelling. I have all my teeth, own my home and property free and clear, have two health care degrees, have taught college courses, and my husband and I even own a contracting company that is quite successful.

So flame my decision if you want, but I don't need other people's validation to help me make decisions. I do quite all right with my own brain.











Quoting CoolMomViv:

I would really like to see any parents who feel the public school system is not working as it is try to do something about that by volunteering at their schools and getting more involved with their children's education than choosing to home-school.

Making the schools in your area better by getting the community involved is a selfless act that benefits everyone. Homeschooling your child is a selfish act that makes you feel better about yourself and your child's education--sometimes erroneously--while setting your child apart from other children of the same age and possibly stunting their social growth. In addition, it may not be "better" than public schools, depending on the parent's ability to teach.

Teaching isn't all about knowledge, true. Some people who are academically informed may not be able to teach at the level a child needs to understand the content, and those people should NOT be teaching children! 

But those with degrees in education don't just learn their subjects, they are also instructed in how to assess children early on for learning disabilities and other issues that can cause them to struggle in school, and develop educational plans and interventions to address those issues.

They also learn about the developmental stages of children, and they cater the levels of knowledge and comprehension to the appropriate level for the child's age.

If you do not have any of that background, you may be honestly trying to give your child the best education you can and yet actually making it harder for them to learn, or teaching them at the most basic level while not developing their abilities for analysis, synthesis and evaluation (the highest levels of comprehension).

If you want to homeschool, it should not be a decision based on impulsiveness or a general sense that the school system is lacking and you could "do it better". You should be making an informed choice, based on all the research and data that is out there about your own local schools and the home-schooling requirements in your area. If you are not willing to go to that trouble for your children, you are not going to be doing them any favors by choosing to teach them at home rather than volunteering at their local school. 

One  more thing--the requirements for kindergarten in Michiana are not at all what the poster who mentioned "counting to 100" and "4 sentence paragraphs" stated! That is an out-and-out falsehood.

Michiana guidelines follow the Michigan state-approved prerequisities and milestones for every grade level. They can easily be found simply by going to the Michigan Department of Education website and looking them up. Kindergarten-readiness is more about emotional maturity than specific milestones. Even so, at the most a kindergarten teacher would like a prospective student to know how to count to ten, know her alphabet and spell her own name properly.

By the END of kindergarten, a child is expected to: 

• Easily recognize about 18 words 

he/she sees in and around the 

home.  (His/her name, brand 

names, and logos.) 

• Easily recognize a few basic 

words.  (Go, the, and, is, etc.--

you can get a list from your 

child’s teacher.) 

Note: recognize means "understands what they mean", not necessarily be able to write them!

• Follow the written text of familiar 

stories by pointing to known 

words. 

• Be able to predict unknown 

words. 

• Know the meaning of words he/she 

hears and sees often.  (Ask the 

teacher for a grade-level 

vocabulary list.) 

• Try to figure out the meaning of 

new words and phrases. 

• Form upper and lower case letters. 

• Write from left to right and top 

to bottom leaving space 

between words.

That's it, and that's once the child has COMPLETED kindergarten.

If you could not find those guidelines yourself, you probably should reconsider home-schooling your child. One of the first things kids should learn is that you don't have to know everything, you just have to know how to find the information when you need it!

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
sha_lyn68
by Platinum Member on Apr. 30, 2012 at 10:39 PM

WA state has 4 options available. None of which is the requirement to have at least an AA. How long ago did you homeschool?

Quote:

1 - be supervised by a certificated teacher for one contact hour per week, OR...
   
2 - have earned 45 college-level credit hours or 1 year of college, OR...
   
3 -be deemed sufficiently qualified to homeschool by the superintendent of the school district in which you reside, OR...
   
4 - have completed a course in home-based instruction at a post-secondary institution or vocational-technical school.
The above c/p is from:http://www.homeschooloasis.com/art_wa_st_hs_law.htm
Quoting stickyfingers:

washington


Quoting sha_lyn68:

What state was that in?

Quoting stickyfingers:

when i homeschooled my son you were supposed to have an AA at least.





Quoting justme00:

o good lord yet another person talking out their butt. lol Ohio homeschool law http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/laws/blOH.htm



 Not only can the parent have a GED but they DONT have to go to school to be a teacher. lol please get your facts right.



PA homeschool laws http://home.comcast.net/~askpauline/hs/homeschoollaw.html



 again your worng and again get your facts right. please and thank you.



Quoting noel1978:



it's easy for someone to say they are homeschooling their kids. any one can not put their kids in the school and get away with it. the only one suffering is the kids. i've looked into homeschooling and in the state of ohio the only way you can do it is if you have a diploma and are going to school to be a teacher. in pa there is a program you have to be on and they will supply you with a computer for each one of your children and then they take and test the kids themselves to make sure that the parent is doing their job. in indy there is a program that you can join and they will meet up with you every friday to make sure you are following the program. and in mich you have all three programs. or so i was told. but if the parents don't care about their kids, then they don't even bothering searching for the info. i was thinking about it but then we got the kids into a better school so i'm not to worried now.









sha_lyn68
by Platinum Member on Apr. 30, 2012 at 10:45 PM

Just because homeschooling was tough for your daughter does not mean it is tough for most. If her twins were bored, that is her fault and not the fault of homeschooling. If she felt it was too tough, that is probably because she tried to recreate a classroom within her home. 

Name one state in the US where a specific curriculum must be used. Name one state in the US where the homeschoolers must take tests throughout the year.

Quoting lga1965:

 I have a strong feeling that your state requirements involve having " a piece of paper"....in other  words, you will need proof that you are qualified to homeschool and I bet you will need at least a high school diploma. Why don't you have that?

 Home schooling is tough. My daughter who has a 4 year elementary education degree home schooled her twin daughters for a year. Her kids were bored and asked to go to public school with their friends after that year. My daughter thought it was a good idea and knew their happiness was the most important thing.. They are in 8th grade now and get straight A's. It worked out for the best.

You will have to follow specfic curriculum and your kids have to take tests throughout the year . If they don't they won't have a complete education and not be eligible to graduate high school. That will handicap them and restrict their opportunities in life. You need to think of them first.

stickyfingers
by Platinum Member on Apr. 30, 2012 at 10:54 PM
oh oops. yes those are the same guidelines we had then.


Quoting stickyfingers:

7 or 8 years ago.




Quoting sha_lyn68:

WA state has 4 options available. None of which is the requirement to have at least an AA. How long ago did you homeschool?



Quote:

1 - be supervised by a certificated teacher for one contact hour per week, OR...
   
2 - have earned 45 college-level credit hours or 1 year of college, OR...
   
3 -be deemed sufficiently qualified to homeschool by the superintendent of the school district in which you reside, OR...
   
4 - have completed a course in home-based instruction at a post-secondary institution or vocational-technical school.
The above c/p is from:http://www.homeschooloasis.com/art_wa_st_hs_law.htm
Quoting stickyfingers:

washington








Quoting sha_lyn68:

What state was that in?

Quoting stickyfingers:

when i homeschooled my son you were supposed to have an AA at least.











Quoting justme00:

o good lord yet another person talking out their butt. lol Ohio homeschool law http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/laws/blOH.htm





 Not only can the parent have a GED but they DONT have to go to school to be a teacher. lol please get your facts right.





PA homeschool laws http://home.comcast.net/~askpauline/hs/homeschoollaw.html





 again your worng and again get your facts right. please and thank you.





Quoting noel1978:





it's easy for someone to say they are homeschooling their kids. any one can not put their kids in the school and get away with it. the only one suffering is the kids. i've looked into homeschooling and in the state of ohio the only way you can do it is if you have a diploma and are going to school to be a teacher. in pa there is a program you have to be on and they will supply you with a computer for each one of your children and then they take and test the kids themselves to make sure that the parent is doing their job. in indy there is a program that you can join and they will meet up with you every friday to make sure you are following the program. and in mich you have all three programs. or so i was told. but if the parents don't care about their kids, then they don't even bothering searching for the info. i was thinking about it but then we got the kids into a better school so i'm not to worried now.

















Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Mommy2Phenley
by Silver Member on Apr. 30, 2012 at 10:55 PM
2 moms liked this

I think this is one of the major misconceptions people have about homeschooling. It doesn't matter if we don't remember the weight of Barium! Homeschooling doesn't mean we sit on the couch each day and share only what we remember and know ourselves! When it comes time for our child to learn that little fact, it will be in their textbook or whatever else we are using to study at the time! Not to mention, it's a fairly useless fact anyway. You pointed it out yourself, no one remembers! The only ones who do, are the ones who need to know it for their career or hobby. If that's the direction the child is going, they will be continuing to study that fact, not just introduced to it in 5th grade and never see it again.

I don't believe in education being a list of facts they need to memorize just to forget as soon as they are beyond the test. I believe more in teaching them to love learning and teaching them *how* to learn and find the information they need. With those two things, you can do anything. Obviously the basics need to be mastered, but memorizing the weight of Barium or the date of the Gettysburg Address are not facts you need to remember in order to live a full, complete, and successful life.

Quoting Mvk123:

I have a masters and my husbands a doctor, but we are practically clueless when watching that show, "Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader?" Do you remember the weight of Barium or the date of the Gettysburg Address? If not, don't homes bool because your kids will be left behind. It's not fair.


___________________________________

Our homeschooling blog: Seeking Squirrels

lga1965
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 11:08 PM

 Many counties in Minnesota. Testing is done at east once every year. There are specific standards. You can't just say your kids have learned, they have to prove it.That is how schools always work,even home schools.

My daughter tried home schooling, did a good job,and realized her kids needed more. she didn't think it was "tough" to homeschool. I do think it is. Her daughters are sociable and need the public school opportunities,. They not only get straight A's every quarter,every year but they are top seeds on the school tennis team and they do volunteer work with others.

I truly do not understand the advantages in home schooling.I would have been very unhappy if my Mom had wanted to homeschool me. I never even heard of hmeschooling until I started reading about it a few years ago and ,of course, here.

Quoting sha_lyn68:

Just because homeschooling was tough for your daughter does not mean it is tough for most. If her twins were bored, that is her fault and not the fault of homeschooling. If she felt it was too tough, that is probably because she tried to recreate a classroom within her home. I think you misunderstood what I said.

Name one state in the US where a specific curriculum must be used. Name one state in the US where the homeschoolers must take tests throughout the year.

Quoting lga1965:

 I have a strong feeling that your state requirements involve having " a piece of paper"....in other  words, you will need proof that you are qualified to homeschool and I bet you will need at least a high school diploma. Why don't you have that?

 Home schooling is tough. My daughter who has a 4 year elementary education degree home schooled her twin daughters for a year. Her kids were bored and asked to go to public school with their friends after that year. My daughter thought it was a good idea and knew their happiness was the most important thing.. They are in 8th grade now and get straight A's. It worked out for the best.

You will have to follow specfic curriculum and your kids have to take tests throughout the year . If they don't they won't have a complete education and not be eligible to graduate high school. That will handicap them and restrict their opportunities in life. You need to think of them first.

 

sha_lyn68
by Platinum Member on Apr. 30, 2012 at 11:29 PM

Homeschool laws are set by the state and not the county.

Once a year standardized testing  is not having to take tests throughout the year. Also, Minnesota law states that the results of the yearly standardized tests are not submitted to the school district.

Specific standards is not the same thing as a specific curriculum, but even then there are only a couple of states that set specific standards(and Minnesota is not one of them). Minnesota laws only list the required basic subjects of Reading, writing, literature, fine arts, math, science, history, geography, government, health, and physical education.

Public schools are not the only place to be social.

Information on MN laws from: http://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/Minnesota.pdf 

Quoting lga1965:

 Many counties in Minnesota. Testing is done at east once every year. There are specific standards. You can't just say your kids have learned, they have to prove it.That is how schools always work,even home schools.

My daughter tried home schooling, did a good job,and realized her kids needed more. she didn't think it was "tough" to homeschool. I do think it is. Her daughters are sociable and need the public school opportunities,. They not only get straight A's every quarter,every year but they are top seeds on the school tennis team and they do volunteer work with others.

I truly do not understand the advantages in home schooling.I would have been very unhappy if my Mom had wanted to homeschool me. I never even heard of hmeschooling until I started reading about it a few years ago and ,of course, here.

Quoting sha_lyn68:

Just because homeschooling was tough for your daughter does not mean it is tough for most. If her twins were bored, that is her fault and not the fault of homeschooling. If she felt it was too tough, that is probably because she tried to recreate a classroom within her home. I think you misunderstood what I said.

Name one state in the US where a specific curriculum must be used. Name one state in the US where the homeschoolers must take tests throughout the year.

Quoting lga1965:

 I have a strong feeling that your state requirements involve having " a piece of paper"....in other  words, you will need proof that you are qualified to homeschool and I bet you will need at least a high school diploma. Why don't you have that?

 Home schooling is tough. My daughter who has a 4 year elementary education degree home schooled her twin daughters for a year. Her kids were bored and asked to go to public school with their friends after that year. My daughter thought it was a good idea and knew their happiness was the most important thing.. They are in 8th grade now and get straight A's. It worked out for the best.

You will have to follow specfic curriculum and your kids have to take tests throughout the year . If they don't they won't have a complete education and not be eligible to graduate high school. That will handicap them and restrict their opportunities in life. You need to think of them first.

 


momofkandb
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 11:30 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree.  I teach and end up fixing the homeschooling issues.

VanessaCB
by Bronze Member on Apr. 30, 2012 at 11:36 PM

Do you have friends that are not related to you? Are friends strangers to you? My child goes to a public charter  school and she has tons of friends and caring adults--teacher, speech therapists, assistants--who love her. These are not strangers.  They are ALL part of our school family.

Quoting amazzonia:

is not about grades, is about learning, and exploring and being with your family more than with strangers


momofpreemieboy
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 11:43 PM

Ok may be I should have emphasized with all capitals so people thought I was yelling the words. LOL . Sorry the word was a little mixed up (etc) I was trying to rush. Maybe you need to grow up and stop nit picking every word or sentence. So get a life for yourself. STOP BEING so CHILDISH!!!!! Does that look better for emphasizing? Good luck demonica. GOD loves YOU.

Quoting demonica29:

Quoting momofpreemieboy:

Unfortunately we have schools with Graduates that can not spell, read, or do math. I have a stepson not raised by me. Who Graduated and he has trouble with some simple math and let's not get into percentages. He can not write legibly or write cursive much at all I was appalled. My girls can read write and spell most of the time. They also Graduated. I plan on Home schooling my DS who is almost 2. I'm worried about home schooling him only because of not having interaction with children his age. I've had testing done which is mandatory here. I excelled in all areas. Math all the way up to trigonometry, writing, language, social studies, ect. So the only thing stopping me is my worry about his socializing. I just wish the testing was mandatory in every state and province of the United States. That way all children get a good and proper education. I also wish all teachers never gave up on proper teaching. Sorry it was so long! And I do agree with you! Do not teach your children if you yourself can't do the math LOL




Why did you capitalize graduates, graduated and home? None of them should be capped. And the abbreviation for et cetera is etc. not ect. perhaps home schooling is not the best option for your child.


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN