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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

I don't have the same level of respect for military wives.

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

YOUR spouse serves for our country not you.  Its not a sacrifice YOU had to make.  There are plenty of other men out there.  I don't take credit for my husbands job which takes him away for weeks at a time.  You are not an extension of your husbands job, quit claiming how hard it is to be "that kind of wife".  You had to know he was going to leave, risk death ect <which as an American I am indebted to>  but you meh, your just a side dish of the main course.

Posted by Anonymous on May. 30, 2012 at 3:16 PM
Replies (21-30):
missamanda86
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2012 at 3:25 PM

NO shit really.......that wasnt the point of that post

Quoting Anonymous:

Civilian wives are also responsible for thier children if thier dh or so dies. It isn't like they have magic powers where thier husbands don't die.

Quoting missamanda86:

I stand by my husband, the soldier, who puts his life on the line along with hundreds of thousands of others. I am the one left to raise our kids alone if he dies fighting for our freedom. Unlike civilian wives, us military wives sacrifice so much more IMO so that everyone has the freedom  they fight for...a side dish? Get real....how many of those military men and women wouldnt be half the person they are without thier spouses support and love





Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on May. 30, 2012 at 3:26 PM
30 moms liked this

I am a military wife - a member of that sisterhood of women who have had the courage to watch their men go into battle, and the strength to survive until their return. Our sorority knows no rank, for we earn our membership with a marriage license, travelling over miles, or over nations to begin a new life with our military husbands. Within days, we turn a barren, echoing building into a home, and though our quarters are inevitably white-walled and unpapered, we decorate with the treasures of our travels, for we shop the markets of the globe.

Using hammer and nail, we tack our pictures to the wall, and our roots to the floor as firmly as if we had lived there for a lifetime. We hold a family together by the bootstraps, and raise the best of 'brats', instilling in them the motto: "Home is togetherness", whether motel, or guest house, apartment or duplex. As military wives we soon realize that the only good in "Good-bye" is the "Hello again". For as salesmen for freedom, our husbands are often on the road, at sea, or in the sky, leaving us behind for a week, a month, an assignment.

During separations we guard the home front, existing until the homecoming. Unlike our civilian counterparts, we measure time, not by years, but by tours - married at Petawawa, a baby born at Gagetown, a special anniversary at Uplands, a promotion in St Jean. We plant trees, and never see them grow tall, work on projects completed long after our departure, and enhance our community for the betterment of those who come after us.

We leave a part of ourselves at every stop. Through experience, we have learned to pack a suitcase, a car or hold baggage, and live indefinitely from the contents within: and though our fingers are sore from the patches we have sewn, and the silver we have shined, our hands are always ready to help those around us. Women of peace, we pray for a world in harmony, for the flag that leads our men into battle, will also blanket them in death.

Yet we are an optimistic group, thinking of the good, and forgetting the bad, cherishing yesterday, while anticipating tomorrow. Never rich by monetary standards, our hearts are overflowing with a wealth of experiences common only to those united by the special tradition of military life. We pass on this legacy to every military bride, welcoming her with outstretched arms, with love and friendship, from one sister to another, sharing in the bounty of our unique, fulfilling military way of life.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on May. 30, 2012 at 3:26 PM
1 mom liked this
Well I'm in the military along with my spouse so STFU :)
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 30, 2012 at 3:26 PM

my husband drives to work everyday, hypothetically he could be killed at any time.  You are not an extension of your husband

Quoting Piskie:

Had to? No...
But tell me, how many times has your husband nearly been killed? How many of his friends has he seen die before his eyes?
How many flashbacks have you dealt with...
Being a military wife is different.


AmberMerrell
by on May. 30, 2012 at 3:26 PM
3 moms liked this
If ANYBODY agrees with you I hope you all live your entire lives being lonely. I am not a military wife & I never could be one. The thought of my husband leaving me for long periods of time & possibly not coming back or coming back & not remembering me/being scared everytime something loud happens scares me. Like I said I could not do it!! So here's big prop to all your military wives & to all the wives whose husband's do anything similar!!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 6 on May. 30, 2012 at 3:26 PM
7 moms liked this

WOW! Someone sounds bitter. I stand next to my husband, who is a Soldier. He may leave to go fight a war, but I am left behind to carry on with out him. Yes, I KNEW what I was marrying into. I don't rant and rave about how hard I have it. Yes, it "CAN" be hard, but to call a Military wife, a side dish, well that is  just rude and degrading. Women like you who judge Military wives, rather you're one or not, make me ill. If a Military wife wants to bitch, complain, and say I have it hard, then LET HER. It doesn't HURT YOU one little bit! It doesn't effect your life at all, now does it?

LovelyBugs
by on May. 30, 2012 at 3:27 PM
I kind of agree

Quoting Anonymous:

Civilian wives are also responsible for thier children if thier dh or so dies. It isn't like they have magic powers where thier husbands don't die.



Quoting missamanda86:

I stand by my husband, the soldier, who puts his life on the line along with hundreds of thousands of others. I am the one left to raise our kids alone if he dies fighting for our freedom. Unlike civilian wives, us military wives sacrifice so much more IMO so that everyone has the freedom  they fight for...a side dish? Get real....how many of those military men and women wouldnt be half the person they are without thier spouses support and love

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
AmberMerrell
by on May. 30, 2012 at 3:27 PM
If ANYBODY agrees with you I hope you all live your entire lives being lonely. I am not a military wife & I never could be one. The thought of my husband leaving me for long periods of time & possibly not coming back or coming back & not remembering me/being scared everytime something loud happens scares me. Like I said I could not do it!! So here's big prop to all your military wives & to all the wives whose husband's do anything similar!!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Mommavieve
by on May. 30, 2012 at 3:27 PM
Not to mention, that military member knew what he/she was getting into when they joined, so that argument is null and void.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 30, 2012 at 3:27 PM
2 moms liked this

is this like a wives prayer they hand you when you sign up?  I watch over my family as well

Quoting Anonymous:

I am a military wife - a member of that sisterhood of women who have had the courage to watch their men go into battle, and the strength to survive until their return. Our sorority knows no rank, for we earn our membership with a marriage license, travelling over miles, or over nations to begin a new life with our military husbands. Within days, we turn a barren, echoing building into a home, and though our quarters are inevitably white-walled and unpapered, we decorate with the treasures of our travels, for we shop the markets of the globe.

Using hammer and nail, we tack our pictures to the wall, and our roots to the floor as firmly as if we had lived there for a lifetime. We hold a family together by the bootstraps, and raise the best of 'brats', instilling in them the motto: "Home is togetherness", whether motel, or guest house, apartment or duplex. As military wives we soon realize that the only good in "Good-bye" is the "Hello again". For as salesmen for freedom, our husbands are often on the road, at sea, or in the sky, leaving us behind for a week, a month, an assignment.

During separations we guard the home front, existing until the homecoming. Unlike our civilian counterparts, we measure time, not by years, but by tours - married at Petawawa, a baby born at Gagetown, a special anniversary at Uplands, a promotion in St Jean. We plant trees, and never see them grow tall, work on projects completed long after our departure, and enhance our community for the betterment of those who come after us.

We leave a part of ourselves at every stop. Through experience, we have learned to pack a suitcase, a car or hold baggage, and live indefinitely from the contents within: and though our fingers are sore from the patches we have sewn, and the silver we have shined, our hands are always ready to help those around us. Women of peace, we pray for a world in harmony, for the flag that leads our men into battle, will also blanket them in death.

Yet we are an optimistic group, thinking of the good, and forgetting the bad, cherishing yesterday, while anticipating tomorrow. Never rich by monetary standards, our hearts are overflowing with a wealth of experiences common only to those united by the special tradition of military life. We pass on this legacy to every military bride, welcoming her with outstretched arms, with love and friendship, from one sister to another, sharing in the bounty of our unique, fulfilling military way of life.


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