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Teaching preschooler to read?

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

At what age can you teach your preschooler to read? DD is 3. I've seen some teaching materials for ages 18 months to 5 years. What do you think? If you have older children, did you work with them on this around age 3?

Posted by Anonymous on Jun. 10, 2012 at 9:23 AM
Replies (31-40):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:03 AM


Quoting PhoebemomofBRDM:

My oldest taught himself to read at 2. My 12 year old, started at 4. My 10 year old started at 3. My 9 year old started at 5. Honestly, you have to wait until they're developmentally ready or else they won't want to learn. The average age for learning to read is 5-6. Don't buy into the claims made by "Your Baby Can Read," because that system can mess your child up later. With each of my children (except my oldest), I waited until they wanted to learn. (I could tell by their want to read everything—road signs, menus, etc.)


Right, she does ask what various signs say, whether while we are driving or walking.

jonellg
by on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:06 AM

I've had so many people tell me it's a waste of time. THen I have DS go get a book and read it to them and they flip "OMG he's gifted!" Uhm, not likely he's just been taught to read. My kids are both obsessed with learning because that's the only choice they have been given. lol THey were watching preschool prep DVDs in thier cribs. 

Quoting specialwingz:

I read to mine from day one, as well.  It was when they started pointing at pictures and words and trying to say them at a year, that I decided to nurture that into full-blown reading.  My ex-husband thought I was nuts.  Till they were reading better than him by the time they were 6 yrs old.  LMAO!

Quoting jonellg:

I encourage people to start young but they never listen. I started both of mine from birth, mainly videos and flash cards but it has helped a lot they are little sponges.

Quoting specialwingz:

I also think it could be the norm if people would only do it.  I was just afraid someone would see my response and think I thought every kid should be able to do it.  And, I hate starting drama.  LOL.  =)

Quoting jonellg:

It's not normal, but it could be. If more people would try they would see kids can learn all kinds of things very young. I do not think my kids are gifted, I just started teaching them very young.

Quoting specialwingz:

All 4 of my kids were all reading by 3 years.  My twin boys, actually 2.  They just seemed to pick it up  lickity-split.  We did ABC flash cards every night after bath time.  I started them at 1 yr.  It became "our thing" to do every evening.  By 18 months, they knew all their ABCs and I moved on to small word flashcards.  By 2 1/2, they were reading on a 1st grade level.  By 6, they were reading on a high school level.

Now, this is NOT normal!  LOL.  My kids just seemed to have the knack.  So, I'm NOT saying every kid should be able to do this.  I'm just saying that flashcards were the key for us.  Kids like that kind of thing when you are consistent and make it fun.






PhoebemomofBRDM
by on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:06 AM
She's probably ready then. Start with the alphabet and the different sounds. If she's truly ready, she'll almost instantly, grasp the concept of putting the sounds together to make words.


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting PhoebemomofBRDM:

My oldest taught himself to read at 2. My 12 year old, started at 4. My 10 year old started at 3. My 9 year old started at 5. Honestly, you have to wait until they're developmentally ready or else they won't want to learn. The average age for learning to read is 5-6. Don't buy into the claims made by "Your Baby Can Read," because that system can mess your child up later. With each of my children (except my oldest), I waited until they wanted to learn. (I could tell by their want to read everything—road signs, menus, etc.)


Right, she does ask what various signs say, whether while we are driving or walking.


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NDADanceMom
by on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:11 AM
1 mom liked this

 Kids can learn to decode as babies.    Whole language education is better.  So many moms train their kids like poodles.  "look my baby can say this word" alas even in 5th grade some of those little poodles cant use the word in context.  Its not a race.  Just read daily to your child and they will be better readers than all these kids that went through the "my baby can read" crap.

La_Vie_en_R0se
by Gold Member on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:18 AM

I am a former reading teacher, as well as having taught 3rd grade and preschool.  When a child shows interest, that is a good time, whether they are 2, 3, or four...doesn't matter.  Honestly, the best thing you can do for your child is to read to her everyday.  Let her also see you reading frequently on your own.  My son learned to read when he was 3, and was reading at an end of 3rd grade level (36) when he was in kindergarten.  I did not formally teach  him to read, we just read a lot together.  When he asked questions about sounds and letters, I answered them.  He began to put the sounds together on his own, and I bought some phonics readers and board games for us to play together. 

If you want to begin formal lessons teaching her about sounds and letters, one of the best programs I have seen is Fundations.  I would look into that.  But don't force it...you don't want to turn her off from reading.  Make it fun and show her that reading is important...point out signs, store names, etc.  She will want to learn when she sees it has value. 

The other important component to reading is sight words/high frequency words.  Fundations does incorporate that into their prgraom.  I believe it is a K-3 program though.  Do an internet search for "Dolch List" or "High Frequently Sight Words".  These are the words most common to the English Language that generally do not follow spelling/phonetic patterns.  People learn them from memorizing them.  When I taught preschool, we would do circle games with flash cards.  My preschoolers left me knowing about 50 sight words each heading off to kindergarten.  Most important thing though is to not make it seem like work or a chore.  :)

Bethsunshine
by Emerald Member on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:20 AM

I taught both of mine how to read when they were 4.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:22 AM

I started with my DD at 3.  We started with sight words and letter sounds.  By the time she turned 4 she was reading simple books.  We kept working with her and by 5 she was reading chapter books.  I didn't use any special materials.  I looked online for a list of sight words, made my own flash cards, and we got started.


Now she will be starting 4th grade and has tested at a high school reading level.  

Ctink8189
by Gold Member on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:23 AM
It really just depends on the child AND your teaching methods. My DD started reading and sounding out small words around 3.5 and now at 5 she can read MOST books on a kindergarten level. I give her preschool ALL the credit by the way, sometimes they just know better ways of going about it than i do.
HIJKLM
by Ruby Member on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:29 AM
My oldest was reading words at 3 and kids books by the time she started school. My other two were a little slower (or maybe I was more tired) but they were reading words by kinder. I always read to them from the time they were born. When they got a little older I'd have them sit and underline the words as I read them.

I think it's good for them. My 5th grader now reads at a 12th grade level. My 4th grader reads at a 6th grade level and my 1st grader reads at a 3rd grade level.

I say it's never too early to start
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Burnz
by on Jun. 10, 2012 at 10:34 AM
2 moms liked this
With all the video watching and flash cards, what are your children doing to have fun and be kids...and babies apparently? While I am an advocate to starting young with exposing children to learning, kids need to be kids. Your kids with have school most of their lives, let them enjoy thier childhood!
****I am a former preschool and second grade teacher with a masters degree with focus on reading instruction.
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