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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

I'm ignorant on this subject - ETA

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

 

Poll

Question: What do you think about bottle propping?

Options:

I would never do that

I don't see anything wrong with it

I do it all the time

other


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 136

View Results

Can someone please explain what the big deal is with bottle propping? No, I don't do it nor do I plan on ever doing it - but is it really that bad? and why? What if the child is supervised? Is it just considered lazy? Is it different when there are multiples?

 

Thank you for all of your replies - now I have a better understanding about the various hesitations on propping. Still not going to prob as it is just not for me and my family - I was just curious. Thanks again!

Posted by Anonymous on Jul. 18, 2012 at 3:21 PM
Replies (81-90):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 15 on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:14 PM
I bottle propped with my twins all the time! its not easy to burp one baby and feed the other lol
Mrs.Kubalabuku
by Ruby Member on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:16 PM
1 mom liked this

Yeah, the bonding issue reminds me of the argument between BFing and Formula Moms sometimes.

"I BF, so I bond better with my baby."  OK, but then you see that BFing Moms pop their baby on the breast then play on their phones, read a book, pay bills, get online, etc...Is the physical contact the main part of this mystical bonding?  I nursed both my sons, and some sessions would be full of coos, staring into each other's eyes, holding hands, but other would just be them laying on my lap while I did something else.  How is that much different?

And you are right.  Every child has a different way to bond.  DS1 enjoyed playing games all day.  Folding laundry was a huge peek-a-boo session.  Shopping was a game.  I couldn't do a thing without having to make it fun for him.  DS2 likes to sit and watch me.  He couldn't care less if I juggled apples and did a handstand.  He rarely laughs, but he smiles when he sees me peeling a potato or washing the dog.

Quoting thetrollcat:

Feeding is not the ONLY time or way to bond with a child. I propped my child in boppies and moved her around the house with me so she could watch me and I would sing or talk or ya know how you always gaga with your baby she liked that. I also found she loved sleeping on her tummy and would often use nap time to sit in a recliner (after feeding time) and allow her to nap laying on my chest while I either napped or watched tv and took a little break from the world and just sit and be lazy. She liked that as well and i would rub her back and her legs often gave her massages and she loved that also.

Despite her sensory issues as long as you were not holding her or say I would strip her down to diaper she loved the massages, STILL DOES ugh (lol)

I just found other ways to bond with her, today she is a very touchy touchy need demanding child. Sometimes I wanna hang her by her by her toes. She is now six.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Ah, good luck.  Sensory issues can do a doozy on a family.  It's hard to make the best choices for our children, especially when their needs seem so far out of the norm.  All my friend wanted to do was cuddle and hold her baby to soothe him, but that made him so much worse!  She used to feel like he was rejecting her, and even considered putting him up for adoption b/c she thought her own infant hated her!

She's lucky, though, b/c he loves eye contact.  She found that when she used the feeding thing with the bottle and sat near him he would stop and look right at her.  Even to this day, his Mommy is the only one he'll make eye contact with for any length of time.  And he only makes any eye contact at all with people he trusts and likes.

Quoting thetrollcat:

She is not special needs that I know of but she seems to have sensory issues. She fusses about clothing, being touched unless of course you are hugging her, she hated laying down as a baby and often propped in boppies or swings when she was an infant. The older she got the less she cried but I did notice her worse moments was when I was breastfeeding... She suffered from really bad acne and other things.... I was pumping and eventually ran dry so I went with formula... It slowly got better after that.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Not to pry, but was she special needs?  I have a friend with an autistic son, and he couldn't stand to be held as a baby.  It tore her apart that her son never wanted to be touched, but once he was diagnosed things got better for them b/c she learned other ways to bond and love him that he could appreciate and enjoy.

She was prescribed a device to feed him with, b/c he absolutely would not let her hold him while he ate.  Those devices aren't normally sold at regular stores b/c they are intended for unique situations.

Quoting thetrollcat:

Mine screamed when we held her

Quoting MIA0223:

I think it's sad.
Babies need to be held. It is lazy and dangerous. The baby also can swallow more air that way and become gassy.







mommy2b39465
by on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:16 PM

I think it is different when you have multiples. I love holding my boys, and actually our biggest time where they get 'mommy time', is when I rock them to sleep. When I feed them, however, I am usually the prop, but it's still bottle propping. I feed them at the same time, and now sit them in high chairs but I used to get boppies and lay them in the boppies and stick the bottles in. I don't think we're worse off for it...

svolkov
by Emerald Member on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:17 PM
None of mine every took a bottle so no I'd never/have never
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
thetrollcat
by Meow on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:20 PM

LOL at your second child sounds so much like my first (she is not the sensitive one) but she was really the quiet one and just loved watching me do stuff, never really motivated to do much on her own unless it was something in her own interest. My second however (Sensory issue) craves attention and loves being the entertainer. (Watch me mom, watch me!) I swear she is add sometimes LOL.

But you are right I just don't buy this Breastfeeding bonding bit because to me bonding means BONDING such as numbers of ways to interact and bond with a child. I think it is absolutely silly that the BF'ers think that people do not find other ways to bond.

As for BF the real reasons behind it is, that for MOST babies it is best, for mine it was NOT. My milk just was not in her favor, the poor thing. i will say i was slightly disappointed, but that just how it goes.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Yeah, the bonding issue reminds me of the argument between BFing and Formula Moms sometimes.

"I BF, so I bond better with my baby."  OK, but then you see that BFing Moms pop their baby on the breast then play on their phones, read a book, pay bills, get online, etc...Is the physical contact the main part of this mystical bonding?  I nursed both my sons, and some sessions would be full of coos, staring into each other's eyes, holding hands, but other would just be them laying on my lap while I did something else.  How is that much different?

And you are right.  Every child has a different way to bond.  DS1 enjoyed playing games all day.  Folding laundry was a huge peek-a-boo session.  Shopping was a game.  I couldn't do a thing without having to make it fun for him.  DS2 likes to sit and watch me.  He couldn't care less if I juggled apples and did a handstand.  He rarely laughs, but he smiles when he sees me peeling a potato or washing the dog.


MahgonayMom
by on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:22 PM

I have never done it. My daughter's doctor told me to never do it. He stated that the milk runs to the babies ears and this is what causes most of the ear infections. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 16 on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:27 PM
did it with both my kids. nobody choked or had any problems. both started holding their own bottles by the time they were 5-6 mos old.
Mrs.Kubalabuku
by Ruby Member on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:32 PM

I can't imagine how I would feel if my boys couldn't nurse from me.  I'm the first woman in my family to nurse in a LONG TIME.  I mean, before formula my family hired wet nurses!  Whethter the problems were medical, mental, or convenience I don't know.  But I really wanted to do it, and it worked!

DS1 is now 4 years old, and he's tough to bond with at times.  Everything is a game, but he makes long, complicated rules.  Like catch.  After I catch the ball I MUSt perform a series of complex movements and sounds before I can throw it back.  If we play SORRY he plays 3 colors while I play the one.  Heck, even running around the yard has rules and regulations.  -_-

DS2 is 4 months (today!) and still just loves to watch everything.  He's started cuddling more, though, which I love.  He grabs my chin with both hands and gives me a big slobber on my lips several times a day, like he's kissing me.  lol  I wonder what kind of kid he'll turn out to be down the road?

Quoting thetrollcat:

LOL at your second child sounds so much like my first (she is not the sensitive one) but she was really the quiet one and just loved watching me do stuff, never really motivated to do much on her own unless it was something in her own interest. My second however (Sensory issue) craves attention and loves being the entertainer. (Watch me mom, watch me!) I swear she is add sometimes LOL.

But you are right I just don't buy this Breastfeeding bonding bit because to me bonding means BONDING such as numbers of ways to interact and bond with a child. I think it is absolutely silly that the BF'ers think that people do not find other ways to bond.

As for BF the real reasons behind it is, that for MOST babies it is best, for mine it was NOT. My milk just was not in her favor, the poor thing. i will say i was slightly disappointed, but that just how it goes.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Yeah, the bonding issue reminds me of the argument between BFing and Formula Moms sometimes.

"I BF, so I bond better with my baby."  OK, but then you see that BFing Moms pop their baby on the breast then play on their phones, read a book, pay bills, get online, etc...Is the physical contact the main part of this mystical bonding?  I nursed both my sons, and some sessions would be full of coos, staring into each other's eyes, holding hands, but other would just be them laying on my lap while I did something else.  How is that much different?

And you are right.  Every child has a different way to bond.  DS1 enjoyed playing games all day.  Folding laundry was a huge peek-a-boo session.  Shopping was a game.  I couldn't do a thing without having to make it fun for him.  DS2 likes to sit and watch me.  He couldn't care less if I juggled apples and did a handstand.  He rarely laughs, but he smiles when he sees me peeling a potato or washing the dog.



kryptomom
by Gold Member on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:34 PM

I have done it, but only on rare occasions and only for a short period of time.  The baby could choke.

thetrollcat
by Meow on Jul. 18, 2012 at 4:41 PM

I did formula feed my first by choice and knowing of breastfeeding but I had no interest or comfort in it, but I was also not ready to be a mother then and suffered from some mental issues at the time. It was probably best I didnt breastfeed at that time as my mother stepped in and helped me a great deal with my first her first six months of yer life, after that she pretty took in my daughter when I simply needed a break.

I did not have another child for ten years (My oldest is now seventeen youngest is six) and with my second I really wanted to do it right (missing I didnt do it the way I had planned with the first) and i still had issues with the breastfeeding and settled with pumping. Overall i think things happen for reason whether intentional or not, fact was my breast milk was affecting my second, again disappointing considering I really wanted her to have my milk.

I do not diss anyone for choosing formula after being in my situation and my experience I have learned that some of us as parents are just not like others, perfect, with the same desires or needs. I do agree with influencing people to at least TRY breastfeeding, you have nothing to lose by TRYING it first is my motto. Formula is always available, Breast Milk can be difficult if you let yourself dry out and besides it is best new borns stick with the same food source their first half of their infanthood.

I do find it disappointing if people are not willing to try and I give those that DO try, a lot of credit even if in the end they end up on formula. I am happy as long as they try it. I just think people need to lay off those that have tried and yet ended up on formula. Seriously, it just turns people off and makes them more defensive even if their logics have no real logic.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

I can't imagine how I would feel if my boys couldn't nurse from me.  I'm the first woman in my family to nurse in a LONG TIME.  I mean, before formula my family hired wet nurses!  Whethter the problems were medical, mental, or convenience I don't know.  But I really wanted to do it, and it worked!

DS1 is now 4 years old, and he's tough to bond with at times.  Everything is a game, but he makes long, complicated rules.  Like catch.  After I catch the ball I MUSt perform a series of complex movements and sounds before I can throw it back.  If we play SORRY he plays 3 colors while I play the one.  Heck, even running around the yard has rules and regulations.  -_-

DS2 is 4 months (today!) and still just loves to watch everything.  He's started cuddling more, though, which I love.  He grabs my chin with both hands and gives me a big slobber on my lips several times a day, like he's kissing me.  lol  I wonder what kind of kid he'll turn out to be down the road?


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