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Parents of higher functioning autistic children.. some questions..

Posted by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 1:55 PM
  • 9 Replies

*first off not wanting to offend by using the term higher functioning I just thought it must be more difficult to diagnose*


1. How old was your child when diagnosed?

2. Who diagnosed him initially? (teachers, daycare workers, GP, specailist, ped)

3. What were their early years like behaviorally/socially/symptoms etc?

4. How did having a diagnoses change things for you and your child? More support? funding?


by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 1:55 PM
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Replies (1-9):
CreziaMommyTo2
by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:20 PM

1. 15 months old

2. i did at 6 months old

3. he had a psychological evauation done through the state

4. he exhibited common ASD behaviors. flapping, tippy toe, spinning, head banging, no eye contact, prefered to play alone than with other

5. the only thing it changed was with therapies.  he got 40 hours a week and he was going to school at the age of 2.  by 3 he had about 30 hours and 5 full days of school by 4 he has about 10 hours and 5 full days of school, at 5 he is in a self contained mainstreamed elementary school, 2 hours at home and he is pushed into a reg ed classroom.

he was not always considered high functioning, but again, high functioning varies.  he is in a self contained class, but yet he is considered high functioning.  but there are children who are in integrated classses who are more high functioing than him, and so forth.

to what degree are you talking about about.

some may say AJ is low functioning.  some may say he is high functioning,  it all depends on who you ask


acaisha
by Gold Member on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:42 PM

I am just frustrated with the system right now. My son has many of the more classic symptoms.. the only one is really the eye contact one. He has tactile, loud noises, crowds, easily over whelmed, does not transition well, aggression and impulsiveness, he plays with himself for comfort, socially he struggles, he is obsessed with symbols, clothing bothers him if it has a seam or a tag.. he wigs.. he has to have choices or he cannot cope... he is 4.. atm he gets a one on one worker to his preschool through early child development but they don't want to diagnose him. He also has an occupational therapist that works with him and a speech therapist. But once he starts school it all ends. He needs a diagnosis of something to get support in school. I see where this is headed.. 2-3 years of struggles and heart ache to see him have a hard time before they finally diagnose him and get him some support.. its frustrating!

my son was also born with a prolaspe so it could be not autism and some level of brain injury from birth.. but it sure seems very autistic-like in his symptoms.

Quoting CreziaMommyTo2:

1. 15 months old

2. i did at 6 months old

3. he had a psychological evauation done through the state

4. he exhibited common ASD behaviors. flapping, tippy toe, spinning, head banging, no eye contact, prefered to play alone than with other

5. the only thing it changed was with therapies.  he got 40 hours a week and he was going to school at the age of 2.  by 3 he had about 30 hours and 5 full days of school by 4 he has about 10 hours and 5 full days of school, at 5 he is in a self contained mainstreamed elementary school, 2 hours at home and he is pushed into a reg ed classroom.

he was not always considered high functioning, but again, high functioning varies.  he is in a self contained class, but yet he is considered high functioning.  but there are children who are in integrated classses who are more high functioing than him, and so forth.

to what degree are you talking about about.

some may say AJ is low functioning.  some may say he is high functioning,  it all depends on who you ask




Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:47 PM
1. She was 4yrs old

2.specialist

3. She didn't talk until she was three, she would line everything up, she would "flap." She never made I connect and she hated being around another kids

4. It just help us know what was the problem which leads us to knowledge ourselves and it got her in a class she needed to be in.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:52 PM

My daughter was just diagnosed and she is 7.  a lot of what you are saying sounds like my dd.  My big issues with her were socially awkward, overwhelmed, loud noises, aggression, crowds, impulsiveness, wandering, clothing was a big thing for her.  If something wasn't right with her shirt she would pick at it until it was a pile of thread.

I started noticing things were off with her when she was about 1.5 and when she was 3 it got worse.  When she started school her teachers noticed it too.  Her docs diagnosed her. and she had a lot of docs evaluating her.

Quoting acaisha:

I am just frustrated with the system right now. My son has many of the more classic symptoms.. the only one is really the eye contact one. He has tactile, loud noises, crowds, easily over whelmed, does not transition well, aggression and impulsiveness, he plays with himself for comfort, socially he struggles, he is obsessed with symbols, clothing bothers him if it has a seam or a tag.. he wigs.. he has to have choices or he cannot cope... he is 4.. atm he gets a one on one worker to his preschool through early child development but they don't want to diagnose him. He also has an occupational therapist that works with him and a speech therapist. But once he starts school it all ends. He needs a diagnosis of something to get support in school. I see where this is headed.. 2-3 years of struggles and heart ache to see him have a hard time before they finally diagnose him and get him some support.. its frustrating!

my son was also born with a prolaspe so it could be not autism and some level of brain injury from birth.. but it sure seems very autistic-like in his symptoms.

Quoting CreziaMommyTo2:

1. 15 months old

2. i did at 6 months old

3. he had a psychological evauation done through the state

4. he exhibited common ASD behaviors. flapping, tippy toe, spinning, head banging, no eye contact, prefered to play alone than with other

5. the only thing it changed was with therapies.  he got 40 hours a week and he was going to school at the age of 2.  by 3 he had about 30 hours and 5 full days of school by 4 he has about 10 hours and 5 full days of school, at 5 he is in a self contained mainstreamed elementary school, 2 hours at home and he is pushed into a reg ed classroom.

he was not always considered high functioning, but again, high functioning varies.  he is in a self contained class, but yet he is considered high functioning.  but there are children who are in integrated classses who are more high functioing than him, and so forth.

to what degree are you talking about about.

some may say AJ is low functioning.  some may say he is high functioning,  it all depends on who you ask




GreenEyePixie
by Platinum Member on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:52 PM
1. He was a few months away from being 4.

2. His therapists, school officials and a nueropsychologist suspected ASD. He was officially diagnosed after a full year of testing and 2 years of therapy notes and other paperwork by a Decelopmental Pediatrician.

3. he stopped all verbal at 16 months nd had a alot of sensory issues. he has speech problems, sensory problems abd has a difficult time understanding gray area things. he also has a lot of issues with social interaction.

4. Having him diagnosed gave us access to new therapy and an understanding of what was happening to our son.
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ack86
by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:53 PM
Bump. I want to see these answers too. I believe my oldest (5) is on the lower end of the spectrum.
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Tigress22304
by Gold Member on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:58 PM


Quoting acaisha:

*first off not wanting to offend by using the term higher functioning I just thought it must be more difficult to diagnose*


1. How old was your child when diagnosed? she was nearly 3yrs old

2. Who diagnosed him initially? (teachers, daycare workers, GP, specailist, ped)her pediatrician

3. What were their early years like behaviorally/socially/symptoms etc? the first 18months-she hit all her marks on time around 18months of age-was the last time she ever laid eyes on her sperm donor-it's just a coincidence that only 2-3 weeks later her vobcaulary started declining and she started regressing....instead of wanting her sippy-she would sign (she was taught sign language early on) for her bottle and her play actions just weren't normal

4. How did having a diagnoses change things for you and your child? More support? funding? she was able to get help via DYFS (CPS) who got me in touch with a great Early Intervention program and they helped me get Princess into a fabulous school where she's excelled so much! We also got a great support system :)


Sekirei
by LoKitty on Oct. 4, 2012 at 3:02 PM

1. Kaelan was diagnosed at about 3 years old. 

2. He was given a general diagnosis by a Pediatric Neurologist, then a definite on by a developmental pediatrician.  I noticed he wasn't learning to speak, so, had him checked by his ped.. who wanted everything checked..just in case. He also has a slight hearing problem.

3. Not speaking, hand flapping, night terrors, screaming fits (not being naughty, he would be completely happy one moment and then.. volcanic eruption!) he could lay on the floor and just push a car back and forth for hours if I didn't say anything to him (he still tries it, he is six now) lack of empathy and if he gets too overwhelmed, he phases out... like, you could wave your hand in front of him, push him, anything and he would not respond.. scare the hell out of me the first time.

4. Nothing has changed for him. He still recieves therapy through school and through ACES. 

ajohnson08099
by *Lyssa Lou* on Oct. 4, 2012 at 3:09 PM

 bump

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