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Question for moms with pit bulls. This is NOT a bash post.

Posted by on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:24 PM
  • 102 Replies

 Let me start by saying I really don't want this to be a bash post. So if it goes that way, I will simply delete the post.

Im posting this for REAL info and advice. Not to argue or degrade anyone or their pet.

 

I've heard that owning a pit, is about learning and raising the dog properly. Otherwise, that's when the dog can become violent, or attack?

Anyways, what does that include? What in the trainning/raising, needs to be done to prevent the dog from becomming violent or attacking?

I'm asking this because this weekend we took our son to the dog/puppy rescue drive. We wanted to see what they had, and possibly adopt one. When we got there, there were several beautiful dogs & puppy's, and if I could, I would have brought each one home. It hurts to walk away and not give them a home :(

Anyways, I immediately saw this little white puppy, white all over, with one black ear, and a black spot around one eye. Female dog, which I prefer. I picked her up ,and she was just so laid back, and was even great with my 3 year old son.

The adoption fee was $100.00 I was so close to telling my hubby, this IS the dog for us... But as I was looking more closely at the dog, I thought, this dog either has pit in it, or is pit.

So I asked, and sure enough... pit...  I won't lie, I've been against ever owning a pit, due to issue's with pits that people I know, or people that my family know, and what has happend with those pits and them hurting and killing.

we walked away that night, without any dog at all. My son cried and cried and cried, he wanted that one soooooo bad, and to be honest, I did too. but I just didn't know, I didn't know if i was risking something by allowing that dog into my home ( because it wouldn't be an outside dog, it would be an inside dog).

Or since I feel this way, am i just someone who has no business EVER getting a dog that is pit, or has pit in it.

So please, give advice/info on what the steps are for owning a pit, with kids/small toddlers?

Like I said, I'm always hearing how it's how the pit is raised that determines if it will attack or not. So what is it that you do / did with raising the dog that stopped that from happening. And how are you certain that the dog didn't attack based on the way you raised it.

by on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:24 PM
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Replies (1-10):
JacobiDavid
by Bronze Member on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:28 PM
I have a 3 yr old pit who lives inside with us. She is an amazing dog. We raised her like any other dog. . . No special training it anything. If I were you I'd go back and adopt her. You'll be so happy. Also your son will love having a pit by his side. Mine is very good with kids. :)
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demonica29
by Gold Member on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:30 PM
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You have it backwards, you don't have to teach them not to attack.  If they are raised with love they are sweet and kind.  It is teaching them to be mean that takes the hard work, that and a whole lot of cruelty.

As with any other dog, particularly big dogis is important to have your dog trained with basics and to respond to your vocal commands.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:31 PM
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Ok. First of all to ease your mind...dalmatians have a stronger bite than pits. I have a pit mix and she's the most docile dog I've ever seen. She's also not the only pit I know to act like that, so I'm not generalizing based on her. I have three children and she is so great with them. The baby even sleeps on her somtimes. She's never bitten in the 7 years I've had her. 

Pitbulls used to be called "nannies" because they were (are) such great family dogs. 

In terms of training the dog, just basic obedience classes are all that is needed. They have them at your local PetSmart or other pet store.  The other things you want to be on the lookout for are food aggression (if the dog snarls if anyone goes near their bowl), snarling if tails and ears are pulled or wariness with quick movements. 

When I brought my pit home I used to mess with her all the time. I'd take her food, pull her tail (lightly) and ears. I did that because I wanted to make sure she showed no aggression and because those are the things little children will do. She never became aggressive at all. **I woud do this with any dog I brought into my house, not just a pit. 

I hope this helps you. Pits have a bad rap and it's truely sad that some of them suffer because of it. They're wonderful pets and deserve love just like the rest of the breeds.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:32 PM
I have soon to be 5 kids all 3 and under and we have 2 pits both mainly indoor dogs. They are awesome with the kids and the one even sleeps next to my twins beds
Anonymous
by Anonymous on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:32 PM
I have soon to be 5 kids all 3 and under and we have 2 pits both mainly indoor dogs. They are awesome with the kids and the one even sleeps next to my twins beds
luckysevenwow
by Platinum Member on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:32 PM
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Pit's are no more dangerous then any other dog. The only real risk is in the power of their jaws, and idiots who raise them to be intimidating/aggressice and mean. This however can be true with any breed.

Recently we had animal control at our house (crazy neighbor). We were talking and he said he would face a pit any day of the week over many other breeds of dogs, and that many small breeds are more volatile, they just happen to be smaller.

Socialization is key, they really are gentle dogs. 

demonica29
by Gold Member on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:33 PM

BTW, my pit is 10 and my  is 5.  My mom was SO scared when I was preggo because my pittie has always been my baby.  From the second I brought the baby home, my girl treated my child as if she had given birth to him herself.

gypsy_rose
by Kandy on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:33 PM

take it through canine good citizen trainging for starters.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:34 PM

Yes!!! The little breeds can be more aggressive but because they're smaller people think the danger is minimal.

Quoting luckysevenwow:

Pit's are no more dangerous then any other dog. The only real risk is in the power of their jaws, and idiots who raise them to be intimidating/aggressice and mean. This however can be true with any breed.

Recently we had animal control at our house (crazy neighbor). We were talking and he said he would face a pit any day of the week over many other breeds of dogs, and that many small breeds are more volatile, they just happen to be smaller.

Socialization is key, they really are gentle dogs. 


mackiebugsmom
by Silver Member on Dec. 3, 2012 at 7:35 PM
My SIL has two pits. Both are great dogs. They didn't do anything special. They just never hit the dogs and they let the dogs be around people..
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