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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Is an uncut penis an issue?

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When my son was born the hospital refused to circumsize him, why? I don't know. I was pretty doped up on pain meds to really ask any questions.. Anyways, I am torn about getting it done. He is 14 months old.
I don't want him to get made fun of for it, and I've never seen one besides his so I don't know if it repulses most women... I want him to be happy...
Do y'all find uncut penis' gross or what? Sorry for the TMI...

CafeMom Tickers
by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 4:04 AM
Replies (541-550):
AdellesMom
by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:18 PM
1 mom liked this
You do what you want to do.

My DS is circumcised. My DH is too. I've never seen an uncut penis and I don't care to see one.

To each their own.
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tharealty2
by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:20 PM

oh sorry,. do some research on your own bc you will a billion different strong opinions on both sides of the issue.  I think he will be ok either way.

AdellesMom
by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:20 PM
Also, if you get it done now, he won't remember it. My son didn't cry at all, he was a newborn.
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doulala
by Silver Member on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:21 PM


Quoting Loving19mommy92:

When they are not circed it put's them at a higher risk of infections and my husband was circed and he wants our son/sons to be the same way. 

Quoting doulala:

As a protective mom concerned about the health & safety of our children, we want to help our husbands learn about reasons to avoid unnecessary risks.    



There is NO link between circumcision and better health. In fact, cutting a baby boy's genitals creates immediate health risks. The foreskin is actually an important and functional body part, protecting the head of the penis from injury and providing moisture and lubrication. Circumcision also diminishes sexual pleasure later in life.


Overall, urinary tract infections (UTI) occur at about the same rate in male and female infants during the first six months of life.7  Regardless of circumcision status, infants who present with their first UTI at 6 months (or less) are likely to have an underlying genitouninary abnormality.  In children with a normal underlying anatomy, a study found as many circumcised infants with a UTI as those who retained their foreskin.8  The appropriate treatment for UTI, in males as well as females, is antibiotics, not prophylactic excision of the prepuce.  According to the AAP, “Urinary tract infections are usually not life threatening and are easily treated in most cases.”  Breastfeeding provides some measure of protection against UTI during the first six months of life.9


The circumcision rate for males worldwide is about 15%.  Even in the US, the only country that circumcises a majority of its male newborns for non-religious reasons, the circumcision rate is decreasing.  According the National Center for Health Statistics, the US circumcision rate is approximately 60% (varies widely by region) and slowly decreasing.  According to many intact males, the “teasing” concern is vastly overstated.  For many boys, genital status is neither an important issue nor one that is discussed.  In the unlikely event of concerns later in life, at least the person can make his own decision about an irreversible body alteration that has no medical justification. 


Children differ from their parents in many ways, including eye and hair color, body type, and (of course) size and sexual development. If a child asks why his penis looks different from that of his circumcised father (or brother), parents can say, "Daddy (or brother) had a part of his penis removed when he was a baby; now we know it’s not necessary and we decided not to let anyone do that to you."


No professional medical association in the U.S. or anywhere else in the world recommends routine circumcision as medically necessary. In fact, leaving boys intact is now the norm in the U.S., with circumcision rates well below 40%.







Loving19mommy92
by Silver Member on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:23 PM

Thank you for the information, however my son will be circumsized either way. 

Quoting doulala:


Quoting Loving19mommy92:

When they are not circed it put's them at a higher risk of infections and my husband was circed and he wants our son/sons to be the same way. 

Quoting doulala:

As a protective mom concerned about the health & safety of our children, we want to help our husbands learn about reasons to avoid unnecessary risks.    



There is NO link between circumcision and better health. In fact, cutting a baby boy's genitals creates immediate health risks. The foreskin is actually an important and functional body part, protecting the head of the penis from injury and providing moisture and lubrication. Circumcision also diminishes sexual pleasure later in life.


Overall, urinary tract infections (UTI) occur at about the same rate in male and female infants during the first six months of life.7  Regardless of circumcision status, infants who present with their first UTI at 6 months (or less) are likely to have an underlying genitouninary abnormality.  In children with a normal underlying anatomy, a study found as many circumcised infants with a UTI as those who retained their foreskin.8  The appropriate treatment for UTI, in males as well as females, is antibiotics, not prophylactic excision of the prepuce.  According to the AAP, “Urinary tract infections are usually not life threatening and are easily treated in most cases.”  Breastfeeding provides some measure of protection against UTI during the first six months of life.9


The circumcision rate for males worldwide is about 15%.  Even in the US, the only country that circumcises a majority of its male newborns for non-religious reasons, the circumcision rate is decreasing.  According the National Center for Health Statistics, the US circumcision rate is approximately 60% (varies widely by region) and slowly decreasing.  According to many intact males, the “teasing” concern is vastly overstated.  For many boys, genital status is neither an important issue nor one that is discussed.  In the unlikely event of concerns later in life, at least the person can make his own decision about an irreversible body alteration that has no medical justification. 


Children differ from their parents in many ways, including eye and hair color, body type, and (of course) size and sexual development. If a child asks why his penis looks different from that of his circumcised father (or brother), parents can say, "Daddy (or brother) had a part of his penis removed when he was a baby; now we know it’s not necessary and we decided not to let anyone do that to you."


No professional medical association in the U.S. or anywhere else in the world recommends routine circumcision as medically necessary. In fact, leaving boys intact is now the norm in the U.S., with circumcision rates well below 40%.








CafeMom Tickers



redvelvet42
by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:30 PM

gross and unsanitary to me,  especially if the guy doesn't pull the foreskin back far enough when he urinates,  and then take wet toilet paper or water to thoroughly clean the area while the foreskin is pulled away

i would imagine that little boys and teens in a rush would have a higher likelihood of developing urinary tract infections as well as having ordors.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

MisterandMe
by Alyssa on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:33 PM
My husband isn't circ 'd and it doesn't bother me at all.
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trebelcleff
by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:39 PM

I would WANT it done, but I wouldn't do it unless they were an infant.  My #1 reason not to do it after a couple of months is because the more they grow, the more there is to cut, and therefore it is putting the child slightly more at risk of something going wrong (namely infection).  My #2 reason is that they tend to be left in soiled diapers longer at that point vs. the frequency at which an infant is changed (unless you diligently change them about once per hour or more) which also increases the risk of infection.  Also, since most are on solids, their poop consistency is a lot... stickier (gag) which is harder to clean off of the surgical site. 

Basically, even though I'd still wish and want for it to be done, I wouldn't do it.  If he wants it done later in life, he can make that decision (even if he is still a child and comes to you or you inform him he has a choice).  

curly287
by Member on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:50 PM
1 mom liked this

I had never seen an uncut penis until I met my current boyfriend. It doesn't bother me at all but I was very curious and anxious to check it out when we were first together. 

Currently 60% of boys in the USA are uncut and the numbers are rising. Your son will not be teased because he looks different...over half of his friends will have a foreskin too!

Bellarose0212
by Gold Member on Dec. 4, 2012 at 11:58 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't think this will be an issue for your son because there are rising numbers of people who are leaving their sons intact. By the time he is ready to be sexually active, as an intact male, he will be the majority, not the minority. There are lots of Europeans and Latin Americans (mmm, Gerard Butler, Ewan McGregor, Gael Garcia Bernal) who have no trouble getting the ladies.

I don't think this is an issue at all, whether or not some women in this forum are familiar with intact males, the women of the future in the U.S. will be because it will be the norm.

Myself, I have only had one partner who happens to be circumcised. We have issues with his reduced sex drive which may or may not be related to circumcision. I have a friend who has been with both and she said sex with both was good but she felt it was easier to feel experienced with intact males since they have their own gliding and lubricant, so hand jobs and blow jobs were easier.

I say, let him have all of his nerve endings and lubricants for maximum pleasure for him and his partner.

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