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4 year old sociopath? Update

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
No emotions, no regrets, didn't care about others things or feelings..


WTF AM I GOING TO DO? I am going to speak to a therapist tomorrow about it


Dh thinks of aspergers as nothing more than a form of mental retardation..what exactly is it?


Update.
Saw the therapist this morning, gave her a basic run down of his past, the trauma leading up to last night. She was able to give me a couple phone numbers of people that might be able to help. I'll be calling them monday or tuesday. Last ditch effort, cps..understandable..just hope it doesn't come down to that. Thank you to everyone that gave advice..and I will look into the foster/therapy/home thing that was suggested. Please keep us in your thoughts and prayers that this gets settled soon
Posted by Anonymous on Dec. 8, 2012 at 4:24 AM
Replies (51-60):
SnortysMom
by CatMarie on Dec. 8, 2012 at 5:17 AM

I hear ya. About so many appts, I mean. I'm a stay at home mom and in the begining, Aidan had so many appointments and therapists coming and going. He's had services for 2 years now and he's gotten so much better. He went from a child who only said a few words to a little boy who is such a chatter box. He entered kindergarten this year and is in an inclusion class. He still gets services, but it's now down to just 2 hours a week. 

Quoting AshandJax:

I think I read that also. That would be good. 
Eventhough he doesnt physically live at home aat the moment, I am litterally prevented from working most jobs b/c of so many appointments. Most are for him. 1,2,3 or more a week and some I have no control of times b/c they have to coninside with her schedule... She has a few more kids other than him. I want to start him on disibility or SS soon... It would help financially and he is on medicaid.. but my hubby does have to kill himself working and I feel horrible b/c I can't do much. And when he comes home, it would be better to stay homee with him other than when he is in school... he would still  go to a special class.
It would also help him out for when he is older.... We don't know if he will be aable to live a "normal" life or not. I just don't want to do anything that might rouin his future. 

Quoting SnortysMom:

I think they were doing that so more kids would be eligible for services. I have a 6 year old who was diagnosed with autism 2 1/2 yrs ago. 

Quoting AshandJax:

The only thing I've heard is that they are taking away the name aspergers and only labeling it as high functioning autism.

Quoting MommyChristina1:

Did you hear that they were pulling Aspbergers as an independent diagnosis out if the new DSM set for release in the spring?

Quoting AshandJax:

Yea. Asperger's syndrome (disorder)

.... lol, assbergers. Still cracks me up. 
He dosn't know. We are going to wait to tell him. He wouldn't understand it right  now and we don't want him to use it as an excuse for bad choices.  

Quoting Anonymous:

Aspi? Asbergers? (sp?)





Quoting AshandJax:

I thought that about my 6 year old too... especially being his father is a true pschyopath. Over a year of digging and therapy and many other things, we have come to find out he is an aspie. Sometimes aspies can seem to have sociopathic traits. 

We went through a lot... even thought about schitzophrenia at one point... Im just thankful we know what it is. He has made so much progress recently now that we understand better how to handle him... he is more controllable. He still hits his teachers and other kids and says horrible things and still dosnt really grasp the concept of danger, love or hate, but he has learned how to control his impulses alot better than he used to.

One reason we have been able to find out so quickly is b/c I made the decision to send him to a theraputic foster home. She has been a life saver. I miss him and want him home, but it was either send him, or keep him home only for him to continue to get worse and be at a school that didn't want to help and pretty much labled him a bad child.








Photobucket
AshandJax
by Silver Member on Dec. 8, 2012 at 5:29 AM

LOL, Ash has the overly proper speech. He really is smart, but the way he talks makes him sound genious for his age... untill he gets on randomness and from subject to subject then we don't know where he went to. I just smile and nod, lol. 
Just a year ago, he couldn't even look you in the eye, now he can at least do that and you can really see those wheels turning while he tthinks about what choice to make... right or wrong. Also, he has become aware of personal bubbles, as I put it. Hes cute with it. He'll get all touchy feely (its ok with us, just not strangers like he tried to do.... so we apply it with us so he can get the picture) he says "OOPS! I'm in your bubble!"
I'm glad its slowed down somewhat, but its still not much b/c we still have appts for his sleep apnea, allergies and general check ups.  

Quoting SnortysMom:

I hear ya. About so many appts, I mean. I'm a stay at home mom and in the begining, Aidan had so many appointments and therapists coming and going. He's had services for 2 years now and he's gotten so much better. He went from a child who only said a few words to a little boy who is such a chatter box. He entered kindergarten this year and is in an inclusion class. He still gets services, but it's now down to just 2 hours a week. 

Quoting AshandJax:

I think I read that also. That would be good. 
Eventhough he doesnt physically live at home aat the moment, I am litterally prevented from working most jobs b/c of so many appointments. Most are for him. 1,2,3 or more a week and some I have no control of times b/c they have to coninside with her schedule... She has a few more kids other than him. I want to start him on disibility or SS soon... It would help financially and he is on medicaid.. but my hubby does have to kill himself working and I feel horrible b/c I can't do much. And when he comes home, it would be better to stay homee with him other than when he is in school... he would still  go to a special class.
It would also help him out for when he is older.... We don't know if he will be aable to live a "normal" life or not. I just don't want to do anything that might rouin his future. 

Quoting SnortysMom:

I think they were doing that so more kids would be eligible for services. I have a 6 year old who was diagnosed with autism 2 1/2 yrs ago. 

Quoting AshandJax:

The only thing I've heard is that they are taking away the name aspergers and only labeling it as high functioning autism.

Quoting MommyChristina1:

Did you hear that they were pulling Aspbergers as an independent diagnosis out if the new DSM set for release in the spring?

Quoting AshandJax:

Yea. Asperger's syndrome (disorder)

.... lol, assbergers. Still cracks me up. 
He dosn't know. We are going to wait to tell him. He wouldn't understand it right  now and we don't want him to use it as an excuse for bad choices.  

Quoting Anonymous:

Aspi? Asbergers? (sp?)





Quoting AshandJax:

I thought that about my 6 year old too... especially being his father is a true pschyopath. Over a year of digging and therapy and many other things, we have come to find out he is an aspie. Sometimes aspies can seem to have sociopathic traits. 

We went through a lot... even thought about schitzophrenia at one point... Im just thankful we know what it is. He has made so much progress recently now that we understand better how to handle him... he is more controllable. He still hits his teachers and other kids and says horrible things and still dosnt really grasp the concept of danger, love or hate, but he has learned how to control his impulses alot better than he used to.

One reason we have been able to find out so quickly is b/c I made the decision to send him to a theraputic foster home. She has been a life saver. I miss him and want him home, but it was either send him, or keep him home only for him to continue to get worse and be at a school that didn't want to help and pretty much labled him a bad child.









Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Dec. 8, 2012 at 5:36 AM
Not really..he works at a plasma donation center. Its in the medical field, but nothing great


Quoting Bonita131:



Quoting Anonymous:

Problem being we can't afford one. He was seeing one through welfare, and it made things worse. I'm afraid of talking to one tomorrow



Quoting MommyChristina1:

:( Poor guy. Get him some help momma. With a therapist trained to deal with trauma and your support, he can make so much progress. I wish you all the best of luck.




Quoting Anonymous:

Yes







Quoting MommyChristina1:

I'm sorry he's going through that. Sounds like something is going on for sure, but a 4 year old sociopath is a bit over the top, just my opinion. He needs a therapist. History of trauma?








Quoting Anonymous:

By 4 kids know right from wrong, not to play with sharp objects, steal, or take a scalpel from his parents and cut himself with it, and then try to get his younger brother to take the blame for it











Quoting MommyChristina1:

He's 4, kids don't develop a real sense if empathy until around 6.





What about your DH? You mentioned he's in the medical field.  He must have some connections where you could get help.


SnortysMom
by CatMarie on Dec. 8, 2012 at 5:37 AM

Well, momma, before I sign off for the night, I just want to send you hugs and well wishes. I hope everything gets better!

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Dec. 8, 2012 at 5:40 AM
Thank you! And thank you for all the information and encouragement


Quoting SnortysMom:

Well, momma, before I sign off for the night, I just want to send you hugs and well wishes. I hope everything gets better!


white_wolf454
by Platinum Member on Dec. 8, 2012 at 5:51 AM

here http://www.aspergersyndrome.org/ 

n autistic spectrum disorder. Children and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome have an intellectual capacity within the normal range, but have a distinct profile of abilities that has been apparent since early childhood. The profile of abilities includes the following characteristics: 

  • A qualitative impairment in social interaction:
    • Failure to develop friendships that are appropriate to the child’s developmental level.
    • Impaired use of non-verbal behaviour such as eye gaze, facial expression and body language to regulate a social interaction.
    • Lack of social and emotional reciprocity and empathy.
    • Impaired ability to identify social cues and conventions.
  • A qualitative impairment in subtle communication skills:
    • Fluent speech but difficulties with conversation skills and a tendency to be pedantic, have an unusual prosody and to make a literal interpretation.
  • Restrictive Interests:
    • The development of special interests that is unusual in their intensity and focus.
    • Preference for routine and consistency.

The disorder can also include motor clumsiness and problems with handwriting and being hypersensitive to specific auditory and tactile experiences. There can also be problems with organisational and time management skills and explaining thoughts and ideas using speech. The exact prevalence rates have yet to be determined, but research suggests that it may be as common as one in 250. The aetiology is probably due to factors that affect brain development and not due to emotional deprivation or other psychogenic factors. 
The characteristics of Asperger’s Syndrome described above are based on the diagnostic criteria and current research and have also been modified as a result of my extensive clinical experience. I would like to provide a personalised description of Asperger’s Syndrome that also incorporates the person’s qualities as well as their difficulties.

From my clinical experience I consider that children and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome have a different, not defective, way of thinking. The person usually has a strong desire to seek knowledge, truth and perfection with a different set of priorities than would be expected with other people. There is also a different perception of situations and sensory experiences. The overriding priority may be to solve a problem rather than satisfy the social or emotional needs of others. The person values being creative rather than co-operative. The person with Asperger’s syndrome may perceive errors that are not apparent to others, giving considerable attention to detail, rather than noticing the ‘big picture’. The person is usually renowned for being direct, speaking their mind and being honest and determined and having a strong sense of social justice. The person may actively seek and enjoy solitude, be a loyal friend and have a distinct sense of humour. However, the person with Asperger’s Syndrome can have difficulty with the management and expression of emotions. Children and adults with Asperger’s syndrome may have levels of anxiety, sadness or anger that indicate a secondary mood disorder. There may also be problems expressing the degree of love and affection expected by others. Fortunately, we now have successful psychological treatment programs to help manage and express emotions.
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Dec. 8, 2012 at 6:42 AM
Thank you and I will read this in the morning, its bedtime now.


Quoting white_wolf454:

here http://www.aspergersyndrome.org/ 

n autistic spectrum disorder. Children and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome have an intellectual capacity within the normal range, but have a distinct profile of abilities that has been apparent since early childhood. The profile of abilities includes the following characteristics: 

  • A qualitative impairment in social interaction:
    • Failure to develop friendships that are appropriate to the child’s developmental level.
    • Impaired use of non-verbal behaviour such as eye gaze, facial expression and body language to regulate a social interaction.
    • Lack of social and emotional reciprocity and empathy.
    • Impaired ability to identify social cues and conventions.
  • A qualitative impairment in subtle communication skills:
    • Fluent speech but difficulties with conversation skills and a tendency to be pedantic, have an unusual prosody and to make a literal interpretation.
  • Restrictive Interests:
    • The development of special interests that is unusual in their intensity and focus.
    • Preference for routine and consistency.

The disorder can also include motor clumsiness and problems with handwriting and being hypersensitive to specific auditory and tactile experiences. There can also be problems with organisational and time management skills and explaining thoughts and ideas using speech. The exact prevalence rates have yet to be determined, but research suggests that it may be as common as one in 250. The aetiology is probably due to factors that affect brain development and not due to emotional deprivation or other psychogenic factors. 
The characteristics of Asperger’s Syndrome described above are based on the diagnostic criteria and current research and have also been modified as a result of my extensive clinical experience. I would like to provide a personalised description of Asperger’s Syndrome that also incorporates the person’s qualities as well as their difficulties.

From my clinical experience I consider that children and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome have a different, not defective, way of thinking. The person usually has a strong desire to seek knowledge, truth and perfection with a different set of priorities than would be expected with other people. There is also a different perception of situations and sensory experiences. The overriding priority may be to solve a problem rather than satisfy the social or emotional needs of others. The person values being creative rather than co-operative. The person with Asperger’s syndrome may perceive errors that are not apparent to others, giving considerable attention to detail, rather than noticing the ‘big picture’. The person is usually renowned for being direct, speaking their mind and being honest and determined and having a strong sense of social justice. The person may actively seek and enjoy solitude, be a loyal friend and have a distinct sense of humour. However, the person with Asperger’s Syndrome can have difficulty with the management and expression of emotions. Children and adults with Asperger’s syndrome may have levels of anxiety, sadness or anger that indicate a secondary mood disorder. There may also be problems expressing the degree of love and affection expected by others. Fortunately, we now have successful psychological treatment programs to help manage and express emotions.

PerfectVirgo
by on Dec. 8, 2012 at 6:47 AM
They don't always know better. My youngest had problems like that. She fine now.

Quoting Anonymous:

By 4 kids know right from wrong, not to play with sharp objects, steal, or take a scalpel from his parents and cut himself with it, and then try to get his younger brother to take the blame for it




Quoting MommyChristina1:

He's 4, kids don't develop a real sense if empathy until around 6.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Dec. 8, 2012 at 6:50 AM

you make a post about your kid, then refuse to divulge any info about him, and expect advice???

Quoting Anonymous:

I know the reasons behind it, but don't want to put it out to the world


Quoting Anonymous:

Seems like there is a rise in mentally sick children lately.

Good luck with your child, hope you get some answers.


Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Dec. 8, 2012 at 6:03 PM
Everyone else was able to give me plenty of advice with the information I provided


Quoting Anonymous:

you make a post about your kid, then refuse to divulge any info about him, and expect advice???


Quoting Anonymous:

I know the reasons behind it, but don't want to put it out to the world





Quoting Anonymous:

Seems like there is a rise in mentally sick children lately.


Good luck with your child, hope you get some answers.




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