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These foodstamps just aren't cutting it!

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

We are a family of six and are receiving $672 a month in foodstamps. While that may seem like a lot to some of you, food is more expensive now and I can't get the foodstamps to last the whole month. I need some tips please!

Posted by Anonymous on Dec. 30, 2012 at 3:25 PM
Replies (381-389):
Lizardannie1966
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:21 PM

If they're able to qualify for any type of government assistance regardless of being employed, it means their income is low enough to actually still get that assistance.

Why do you disagree that they qualify as poor? What is your definition of "poor?"

Quoting moneysaver6:

I didn't say that those who are on public assistance aren't working. I would venture to say that most of them are in one capacity or another.

I simply said that they aren't the working POOR. And they're not.


Quoting Lizardannie1966:

I think you and I have argued this point on a different group a few times before.

Yes, there are plenty of people who ARE working yet do qualify for public assistance such as Medicaid and NA for themselves and/or their children.

It simply depends on their family size and income level.

That they still qualify for government aid puts them under the heading known as, "the working poor."

Don't base evidence on one set of examples.

Quoting moneysaver6:

Those receiving government assistance are NOT the working poor; as is evidenced by this post & it's replies.



Quoting Lizardannie1966:

Ever hear the saying, "working poor?"

How do you know that she and/or her spouse (or SO) isn't working?

Stop buying the stereotype of *who* receives food stamps. It no longer applies to today's economics and families.

Quoting Anonymous:

I have an idea on how to make it stretch.








Get a job.




YzmaRocks
by Ruby Member on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:25 PM
Another thing, if you want some other tips on how to save money that are not food related, just let me know.

I was blessed to grow up in a household where I was taught to budget and be frugal, even though my parents were not poor. I am always searching for ways to save money. It is coming in handy since we have to live off of less than $30,000 this year! So if you need help with budgeting or saving money, I will try to answer your questions :)
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
TempestRayne
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:26 PM
Do you have.school aged children? Check with the lunch program to see if you qualify for free breakfast and lunch. My state.does That.
moneysaver6
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:46 PM
I consider the true "working poor" to be those who are just above the line to qualify for assistance. Those people are REALLY struggling.

I don't have the numbers with me now, but I've seen it laid out before. Those who receive assistance actually bring home thousands more (in many cases, $10K+ more) than those who don't qualify for assistance.

Does that make my position a little more clear? (I'm not being snarky when I ask that. I'm genuinely asking. You seem like you're really wanting to understand my position/thoughts and not just attack.)


Quoting Lizardannie1966:

If they're able to qualify for any type of government assistance regardless of being employed, it means their income is low enough to actually still get that assistance.

Why do you disagree that they qualify as poor? What is your definition of "poor?"

Quoting moneysaver6:

I didn't say that those who are on public assistance aren't working. I would venture to say that most of them are in one capacity or another.



I simply said that they aren't the working POOR. And they're not.




Quoting Lizardannie1966:

I think you and I have argued this point on a different group a few times before.

Yes, there are plenty of people who ARE working yet do qualify for public assistance such as Medicaid and NA for themselves and/or their children.

It simply depends on their family size and income level.

That they still qualify for government aid puts them under the heading known as, "the working poor."

Don't base evidence on one set of examples.

Quoting moneysaver6:

Those receiving government assistance are NOT the working poor; as is evidenced by this post & it's replies.





Quoting Lizardannie1966:

Ever hear the saying, "working poor?"

How do you know that she and/or her spouse (or SO) isn't working?

Stop buying the stereotype of *who* receives food stamps. It no longer applies to today's economics and families.

Quoting Anonymous:

I have an idea on how to make it stretch.











Get a job.




Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 107 on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:47 PM
We are a family of 4 (me and 3 kids) and we get $644. I have trouble making them last all month.
Mommy2Kase
by Member on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:48 PM

That is a lot for a month worths of food.  We are a family of four and spend about 250 a month on groceries.  And we don't have food stamps.  We meal plan and shop at Aldi.  It saves us a lot of money.

-_-
by Ruby Member on Jan. 1, 2013 at 2:48 PM
Stick to it. The end.

Quoting Anonymous:

I've tried but can never seem to stick to it.

Quoting i_lovedyoufirst:

Do you meal plan?

My friend who has a family of 8 gets 1,000. & she still manages to have enough to buy food to cook & make for people who can't afford it.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Lizardannie1966
by on Jan. 2, 2013 at 9:29 AM

I now understand better what you're referring to (and have been before) and I do agree with you to some extent.

I still see families with who have at least one adult working a full-time job (or even 2 part-time) yet can qualify for assistance as the "working poor" as well and because with that paycheck coming in, the benefits are minimal for many of them. Yet so many of them still need the help despite a check from being employed coming in.

Quoting moneysaver6:

I consider the true "working poor" to be those who are just above the line to qualify for assistance. Those people are REALLY struggling.

I don't have the numbers with me now, but I've seen it laid out before. Those who receive assistance actually bring home thousands more (in many cases, $10K+ more) than those who don't qualify for assistance.

Does that make my position a little more clear? (I'm not being snarky when I ask that. I'm genuinely asking. You seem like you're really wanting to understand my position/thoughts and not just attack.)


Quoting Lizardannie1966:

If they're able to qualify for any type of government assistance regardless of being employed, it means their income is low enough to actually still get that assistance.

Why do you disagree that they qualify as poor? What is your definition of "poor?"

Quoting moneysaver6:

I didn't say that those who are on public assistance aren't working. I would venture to say that most of them are in one capacity or another.



I simply said that they aren't the working POOR. And they're not.




Quoting Lizardannie1966:

I think you and I have argued this point on a different group a few times before.

Yes, there are plenty of people who ARE working yet do qualify for public assistance such as Medicaid and NA for themselves and/or their children.

It simply depends on their family size and income level.

That they still qualify for government aid puts them under the heading known as, "the working poor."

Don't base evidence on one set of examples.

Quoting moneysaver6:

Those receiving government assistance are NOT the working poor; as is evidenced by this post & it's replies.





Quoting Lizardannie1966:

Ever hear the saying, "working poor?"

How do you know that she and/or her spouse (or SO) isn't working?

Stop buying the stereotype of *who* receives food stamps. It no longer applies to today's economics and families.

Quoting Anonymous:

I have an idea on how to make it stretch.











Get a job.





Anonymous
by Anonymous 108 on Jan. 8, 2013 at 1:36 PM

Wow ~ I really didn't think there were so many unkind, arrogant, insensitive, and downright mean moms on here.  Sad.  And people wonder why we have a problem in the schools with kids being mean to one another, and bullying.   

I hope you're able to get some help from the moms that did really post the tips you asked for.  Hoping things change for you and your family.

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