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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

DIVERSITY

Posted by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:12 AM
  • 14 Replies

Why is this thrown about that it's a good thing?  I don't think it's a bad thing, but I don't think it's necessarily a good thing either.  I don't think it should matter.  I want my kids to go to a good school, I don't care what the diversity of the school is, I don't care if it's 100% white, 100% black, 100% hispanic, I don't care, I just want it to be a good school where teachers teach and care about the kids; why is the racial makeup a big deal?

The same goes for where I live. I want to live in a neighborhood where the people care about your neighbor, they care about their homes and how they look.  Where they look out for each other and the community.  Why should I care how many blacks, whites, hispanics or asians live in the area?  Why is there this big push, this big emphasis on ... DIVERSITY?

One stated goal of many people is to erase racial discrimination.  The push for diversity seems to accentuate and point out that people of "that race" live there and people of "this race" live here.  It feels like it helps keep the idea of "different" races front and center rather than being concerned about have a GOOD school and living in a GOOD neighborhood.

What am I missing?

by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:12 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mcwife86
by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:18 AM

i know some feel it would teach your kids abt other cultures and all but honestly im in the same boat as you...if the school violence is at a minimum, the drop out rate is low, the teachers are great, and the sports program is great then that is where i want my kid to go. i don't care either way abt how many cultures or how varied the economic spectrum is..i justwant a good school. the same for the neighborhood BUT everyone has their own thing that they think is important. i told a friend of mine that we are looking at nondenominational private schools as an option for when we move and aren't offered a school a we feel comfy with and i was told by her that it would turn him into a spoiled kid if he went to one of those. People are full of all sorts of funny ideas when it comes to what turns kids into things these days.

Junesmommy18
by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:21 AM

Not_A_Native
by Ruby Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:46 AM

Well, obviously test scores are important, parent participation is important, good teachers, and so on.  But the world is getting smaller, we NEED to b able to get along and understand a lot of different cultures.  You can't expect your kids to spend their life in some little town, surrounded by those who are "like" them.

How do you understand different cultures, and become accepting of them?  By being around them. Sharing their holidays, eating their food, seeing them as "people" instead of Mexicans, or Syrians, or Pakistanis or Chinese.

We are in an excellent school district, consistently one of the top 100 high schools in the country.  We have a large variety of cultures, and as such, my kids have friends that have all different cultures - Chinese, Indian, Native American, south American, Korean, Japanese, Russian, black, white and so on.  They feel comfortable "sharing" all these cultures.   I have no doubt they can go out into the world (the world of today) and deal with workers above and below them from all those different cultures.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:47 AM
I want my kids going to school with mostly whites.
hhhanna
by Bronze Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:59 AM

My basic premise is that we are all people, regardless of race.  I don't care if my kids know about Ramadan, or some Jewish holiday, I mean they ARE going to learn it either in school or hear about it on the news.  If someone in the neighborhood or school is celebrating it, then it's a wonderful learning experience, but to have diversity as a GOAL in choosing a school or place to live?

Even you said it - you want your kids (and you) to view other cultures and races as "people", and I certainly agree.  But to work at pointing out the differences ... does that help or hinder the idea of 'we're all just people'.  To say that Johny is an Asian, Sally is a Mexican, Billy is an African-American, uh, no, they are all just people.  If my child asks why at Johny's house they eat rice with many meals (say they were invited over there for dinner a few nights), then we'd have the discussion; but to point it out from the get go???

I'm lost as to why we want our world to accept each other as people, but then we turn around and point out all the differences.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

Well, obviously test scores are important, parent participation is important, good teachers, and so on.  But the world is getting smaller, we NEED to b able to get along and understand a lot of different cultures.  You can't expect your kids to spend their life in some little town, surrounded by those who are "like" them.

How do you understand different cultures, and become accepting of them?  By being around them. Sharing their holidays, eating their food, seeing them as "people" instead of Mexicans, or Syrians, or Pakistanis or Chinese.

We are in an excellent school district, consistently one of the top 100 high schools in the country.  We have a large variety of cultures, and as such, my kids have friends that have all different cultures - Chinese, Indian, Native American, south American, Korean, Japanese, Russian, black, white and so on.  They feel comfortable "sharing" all these cultures.   I have no doubt they can go out into the world (the world of today) and deal with workers above and below them from all those different cultures.


Not_A_Native
by Ruby Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:17 AM


Quoting hhhanna:

My basic premise is that we are all people, regardless of race.  I don't care if my kids know about Ramadan, or some Jewish holiday, I mean they ARE going to learn it either in school or hear about it on the news.  If someone in the neighborhood or school is celebrating it, then it's a wonderful learning experience, but to have diversity as a GOAL in choosing a school or place to live?

Even you said it - you want your kids (and you) to view other cultures and races as "people", and I certainly agree.  But to work at pointing out the differences ... does that help or hinder the idea of 'we're all just people'.  To say that Johny is an Asian, Sally is a Mexican, Billy is an African-American, uh, no, they are all just people.  If my child asks why at Johny's house they eat rice with many meals (say they were invited over there for dinner a few nights), then we'd have the discussion; but to point it out from the get go???

I'm lost as to why we want our world to accept each other as people, but then we turn around and point out all the differences.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

Well, obviously test scores are important, parent participation is important, good teachers, and so on.  But the world is getting smaller, we NEED to b able to get along and understand a lot of different cultures.  You can't expect your kids to spend their life in some little town, surrounded by those who are "like" them.

How do you understand different cultures, and become accepting of them?  By being around them. Sharing their holidays, eating their food, seeing them as "people" instead of Mexicans, or Syrians, or Pakistanis or Chinese.

We are in an excellent school district, consistently one of the top 100 high schools in the country.  We have a large variety of cultures, and as such, my kids have friends that have all different cultures - Chinese, Indian, Native American, south American, Korean, Japanese, Russian, black, white and so on.  They feel comfortable "sharing" all these cultures.   I have no doubt they can go out into the world (the world of today) and deal with workers above and below them from all those different cultures.

 

But see, that's the thing - it's not "pointng out" anything.  It's your 4 year old knowing how to eat with chopsticks because that's what's used at her friends house.  It's knowing what kim chee is - and whether or not they like, and which Asian culture eats it.  It's your 6 year old coming home and informing you that they LOVE latkes.

To be honest, most of us here (pacific northwest) don't pay a lot of attention to race or culture.  It just "is."  The schools are aware of Ramaden - Chinese New year - various other events that they take into account.  They KNOW if something is scheduled on Rosh Hashana, a good portion of kids and/or parents will not attend.  Same thing during Rameden.  No more than someone would show up on Christmas.  It's just all very "accepting."

It's one thing to read about it in a book - another to live with it.  What happens when your kids go off to college - maybe in a big city?  What happens when they join the workforce, and go to India or China for training (yes, it happens).  What happens when their boss is from Pakistan?  Do your kids know the difference in culture between, say, Syria and Iraq?  Vietnam and Cambodia?

GaleJ
by Gold Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:26 AM

We have always chosen as a family to seek the broadest diversity we could; in education, in community, in our congregation. As some have already said the world is getting smaller but beyond all the philosophical reasons, and of course there are many valid ones, is this...I would not want to sit down to table every meal and have the same bland food, I prefer a wide variety and in the same way life is more interesting and flavorful when lived in a vibrant and plural society. My son was raised in the Montessori community and constantly enjoyed the benefits of being surrounded by people of many races, cultures, religions, etc. 

hhhanna
by Bronze Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:30 AM

We appear to be looking at this from two sides of the coin.  First, let me tell you that I lived in PNW for several decades, so I'm very familiar with that area, and to be honest, it's mostly white.  I now live in Houston, where the diversity is very evident.  My dh has bosses who are from Iraq, from India, from Ecuador and I treat them the same as I treat ANY person.

You asked the question, "What happens when their boss is from Pakistan?  Do your kids know the difference in culture between, say, Syria and Iraq?  Vietnam and Cambodia?"  No, and despite diversity most people (not just kids) don't.  Most Americans going to Korea, Japan, Iraq need to take some classes and courses on what the differences between American culture and the culture of the country they are going to.  I just treat people as people, I teach my children that people are people.  When they ask why Billy has dark skin or Johnny has slanted eyes, we talk about it.  I don't need to point these things out, my children ask when the question occurs to them.  I don't seek diversity nor do I shy away from it, I just don't understand why it is pushed, but evidently it is important to some people, you seem to be one of them.  Thanks for replying.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

 

Quoting hhhanna:

My basic premise is that we are all people, regardless of race.  I don't care if my kids know about Ramadan, or some Jewish holiday, I mean they ARE going to learn it either in school or hear about it on the news.  If someone in the neighborhood or school is celebrating it, then it's a wonderful learning experience, but to have diversity as a GOAL in choosing a school or place to live?

Even you said it - you want your kids (and you) to view other cultures and races as "people", and I certainly agree.  But to work at pointing out the differences ... does that help or hinder the idea of 'we're all just people'.  To say that Johny is an Asian, Sally is a Mexican, Billy is an African-American, uh, no, they are all just people.  If my child asks why at Johny's house they eat rice with many meals (say they were invited over there for dinner a few nights), then we'd have the discussion; but to point it out from the get go???

I'm lost as to why we want our world to accept each other as people, but then we turn around and point out all the differences.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

Well, obviously test scores are important, parent participation is important, good teachers, and so on.  But the world is getting smaller, we NEED to b able to get along and understand a lot of different cultures.  You can't expect your kids to spend their life in some little town, surrounded by those who are "like" them.

How do you understand different cultures, and become accepting of them?  By being around them. Sharing their holidays, eating their food, seeing them as "people" instead of Mexicans, or Syrians, or Pakistanis or Chinese.

We are in an excellent school district, consistently one of the top 100 high schools in the country.  We have a large variety of cultures, and as such, my kids have friends that have all different cultures - Chinese, Indian, Native American, south American, Korean, Japanese, Russian, black, white and so on.  They feel comfortable "sharing" all these cultures.   I have no doubt they can go out into the world (the world of today) and deal with workers above and below them from all those different cultures.

 

But see, that's the thing - it's not "pointng out" anything.  It's your 4 year old knowing how to eat with chopsticks because that's what's used at her friends house.  It's knowing what kim chee is - and whether or not they like, and which Asian culture eats it.  It's your 6 year old coming home and informing you that they LOVE latkes.

To be honest, most of us here (pacific northwest) don't pay a lot of attention to race or culture.  It just "is."  The schools are aware of Ramaden - Chinese New year - various other events that they take into account.  They KNOW if something is scheduled on Rosh Hashana, a good portion of kids and/or parents will not attend.  Same thing during Rameden.  No more than someone would show up on Christmas.  It's just all very "accepting."

It's one thing to read about it in a book - another to live with it.  What happens when your kids go off to college - maybe in a big city?  What happens when they join the workforce, and go to India or China for training (yes, it happens).  What happens when their boss is from Pakistan?  Do your kids know the difference in culture between, say, Syria and Iraq?  Vietnam and Cambodia?


hhhanna
by Bronze Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:37 AM

Thanks for the reply.  I am interested in why people think this is such a desirable quality to look for.  I'll stick with taking life as it comes, looking for the best life situations for our family regardless of the racial, ethnic make up.  But thanks for giving me your point of view.

Quoting GaleJ:

We have always chosen as a family to seek the broadest diversity we could; in education, in community, in our congregation. As some have already said the world is getting smaller but beyond all the philosophical reasons, and of course there are many valid ones, is this...I would not want to sit down to table every meal and have the same bland food, I prefer a wide variety and in the same way life is more interesting and flavorful when lived in a vibrant and plural society. My son was raised in the Montessori community and constantly enjoyed the benefits of being surrounded by people of many races, cultures, religions, etc. 


Not_A_Native
by Ruby Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:39 AM


Quoting hhhanna:

We appear to be looking at this from two sides of the coin.  First, let me tell you that I lived in PNW for several decades, so I'm very familiar with that area, and to be honest, it's mostly white.  I now live in Houston, where the diversity is very evident.  My dh has bosses who are from Iraq, from India, from Ecuador and I treat them the same as I treat ANY person.

You asked the question, "What happens when their boss is from Pakistan?  Do your kids know the difference in culture between, say, Syria and Iraq?  Vietnam and Cambodia?"  No, and despite diversity most people (not just kids) don't.  Most Americans going to Korea, Japan, Iraq need to take some classes and courses on what the differences between American culture and the culture of the country they are going to.  I just treat people as people, I teach my children that people are people.  When they ask why Billy has dark skin or Johnny has slanted eyes, we talk about it.  I don't need to point these things out, my children ask when the question occurs to them.  I don't seek diversity nor do I shy away from it, I just don't understand why it is pushed, but evidently it is important to some people, you seem to be one of them.  Thanks for replying.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

 

Quoting hhhanna:

My basic premise is that we are all people, regardless of race.  I don't care if my kids know about Ramadan, or some Jewish holiday, I mean they ARE going to learn it either in school or hear about it on the news.  If someone in the neighborhood or school is celebrating it, then it's a wonderful learning experience, but to have diversity as a GOAL in choosing a school or place to live?

Even you said it - you want your kids (and you) to view other cultures and races as "people", and I certainly agree.  But to work at pointing out the differences ... does that help or hinder the idea of 'we're all just people'.  To say that Johny is an Asian, Sally is a Mexican, Billy is an African-American, uh, no, they are all just people.  If my child asks why at Johny's house they eat rice with many meals (say they were invited over there for dinner a few nights), then we'd have the discussion; but to point it out from the get go???

I'm lost as to why we want our world to accept each other as people, but then we turn around and point out all the differences.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

Well, obviously test scores are important, parent participation is important, good teachers, and so on.  But the world is getting smaller, we NEED to b able to get along and understand a lot of different cultures.  You can't expect your kids to spend their life in some little town, surrounded by those who are "like" them.

How do you understand different cultures, and become accepting of them?  By being around them. Sharing their holidays, eating their food, seeing them as "people" instead of Mexicans, or Syrians, or Pakistanis or Chinese.

We are in an excellent school district, consistently one of the top 100 high schools in the country.  We have a large variety of cultures, and as such, my kids have friends that have all different cultures - Chinese, Indian, Native American, south American, Korean, Japanese, Russian, black, white and so on.  They feel comfortable "sharing" all these cultures.   I have no doubt they can go out into the world (the world of today) and deal with workers above and below them from all those different cultures.

 

But see, that's the thing - it's not "pointng out" anything.  It's your 4 year old knowing how to eat with chopsticks because that's what's used at her friends house.  It's knowing what kim chee is - and whether or not they like, and which Asian culture eats it.  It's your 6 year old coming home and informing you that they LOVE latkes.

To be honest, most of us here (pacific northwest) don't pay a lot of attention to race or culture.  It just "is."  The schools are aware of Ramaden - Chinese New year - various other events that they take into account.  They KNOW if something is scheduled on Rosh Hashana, a good portion of kids and/or parents will not attend.  Same thing during Rameden.  No more than someone would show up on Christmas.  It's just all very "accepting."

It's one thing to read about it in a book - another to live with it.  What happens when your kids go off to college - maybe in a big city?  What happens when they join the workforce, and go to India or China for training (yes, it happens).  What happens when their boss is from Pakistan?  Do your kids know the difference in culture between, say, Syria and Iraq?  Vietnam and Cambodia?

 

Mostly white here?  Uh - ok.  We live right out of Seattle, and no, it isn't mostly white (big city as well).  My husband works for the large software company.  Yesterday, he was in a meeting with someone from Mexico, from India, from Vietnam, from France, from Pakistan.  2 of them had foreign keyboards, so they couldn't even (as they do) use each others keyboards to look at stuff.

Our high school identifies as 38% white.  The largest percentage is Asian - which is kind of funny, since, like "white" covers a large territory.  Korean, for example, is a lot different from Japanese.  And yes, most people around here DO know the difference in cultures.  A lot fo them travel a lot.  Many are from different countries.  My kids learned to use chopsticks at a very early age - because when they'd go to their friends houses that was what was there.  They know the difference between Mexican culture and Ecuadorian culture - because they are friends with kids from each.  Same thing with Iraq and Iran.  The grew up knowing this - which puts them way ahead of wherre I was at that age.

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