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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Are you really DISABLED?

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
So what do you consider acceptable disorder or illness in order to qualify for disability? I ask bc for years I denied the fact that I was ill. I kept saying I can get an job and keep it and when I ended up in the hospital for it bc my health issues got bad. I finally realized I couldn't do it anymore. Today I got my first help applying for disability and I sometiems feel like I don't deserve help thanks to my ex h's words. And yet I know working is physically impossible at this time and admitting that really hurt. But you can only live in denial for so long. (Title is to get you to read this)
Posted by Anonymous on Jan. 18, 2013 at 9:17 PM
Replies (91-100):
jaelynntanamom
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 10:45 AM

I'm not but my husband is and it was hard for him to accept it and draw disability and it still is hard for him. He has MS, scoliosis and spinal stenosis so he can't do much of anything for long periods of time.

-spork2.0-
by Platinum Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 10:52 AM
I could probably get disability if I need it. If my migraines get any worse, I may have to. When I literally can not leave my bedroom more than once a week to get to my job, it blurs my vision, and even just turning on a light to pee blinds me, it is an issue.

But hey, not everyone would see that as disability worthy.
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 19 on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:30 AM


It can be frustrating. I went on disability when I was in my early 30s...they do look at your wage credits and don't have to wait until 55.

I was approved on first read. Actually, I researched the law so I knew what I had to have documented. The SS office called and said they wanted me to see their drs. I asked why since my dr was recommended by the Mayo Clinic and a recognized specialist in the field. She made a comment about something in my records. I told her she needed to keep reading since I had a copy of the record. I was called the next morning and told I was approved and would not have to see one of their drs. I don't now what made me so brave that day, but I knew what was in every record from all of the specialists. I hope things work out. I too have long term disability. When he is approved, they will deduct his SS amount from his long term...I am getting closer to that 65 mark and am terrified. I was married when I applied, so it was going to be okay. The medical issues took a toll on my marriage, so now it is just me. I have also had several major medical problems added to the list over time. 

Good luck.

Quoting Anonymous:

Yeah I have clients at work that are better off then my DH and they get SSI. It just makes absolutly no sense as to how they determine if you are "approved" or not. Very frustrating..

Quoting Anonymous:

Wow I have heard worries like this but man it hits my heart everytime. :/ That is a load of bull. I don't understand why my sister got it for years and she isn't sick and your dh cant. I'm sorry


Quoting Anonymous:

SSI and SSDI are a joke... My dh has been trying to get "approved" for over 2 years now, now we are on the year and a half wait list for a hearing. They consider him not disabled because he could technically be a wal-mart greeter, they only consider your previous income if you are over 55, otherwise you have to take a crap pay job. Sorry but we can't live on a $8.80/hour job when he was making $30/hour. Total crap. He can't do anything normal that he used to do. No mowing the lawn, dishes, laundry, he lost his job because he was hurt on the job and never recovered. Thank god we paid for extended long term disability through his work, he has been approved for that disability until he's 65. That's a very long time considering he's only 36.


I'm gald that you are getting the help you need and I pray that you are approved with much less of a hassle then it has been for my DH





thetrollcat
by Meow on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:32 AM

I would never get denied SSI because legally I am disabled. Yea me!

Anonymous
by Anonymous 19 on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:46 AM

Disabilities are not always visible. Being disabled means the person cannot sustain gainful employment due to a medical issue. I have been on disability for a number of years. One of my doctors actually encouraged me to apply. She told me to list all of my medical issues and there were 28 major diagnoses when I first applied. Among them, systemic lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic and intractable pain, degenerative disc disease, multiple herniations in my neck, etc. Since then, I have had several more conditions added to the list including spinal stenosis, suspicion of glaucoma due to medications I had to take for lupus, osteoporosis which has caused me to lose 2 inches in height, diabetes secondary to medications, blockage in the heart, and many more. I have broken 7 bones due to the osteoporosis and due to nerve damage, my left leg will go out from under me with little warning. I have been told that things will continue to get worse. Every six months the long term disability carrier requires that I fill out a continuing disability form. It becomes very depressing. It used to be every year, but they are trying to force people off of long term disability. The conditions I have do not have a cure and have few treatments. My ssdi amount is low because I worked in a profession that does not pay into ss. I had the required years of work, but they were from when I was young and not making much money.

I have had people on CM tell me that they know a person with one or two of the illnesses who works. Good for them. I wish I could, but know I cannot. I was getting ready to start to law school when I was diagnosed. These days, one trip to the dr and grocery store can put me down for a week. The pain is 24/7 even with strong pain meds. I have out lived the prognosis and refuse to let people make me feel guilty over being disabled. 

OP....I wish you the best. None of us live in your shoes, you do what you must do. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 20 on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:49 AM

I think that in most cases there are options for employment, even with a disability. There has to be something, somewhere that you can do. Not all jobs require that you work out of the home, not all jobs require that you be on your feet all day. I think, even if it means more schooling, there is likely a job out there for everyone, regardless of condition.

Aena
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 12:00 PM

I am disabled, and receive social security. I have a host of disabilites and would rather not talk about them except my back, I have degenerative disk disease, stenosis (narrowing of my spinal canal), radiculopathy (numbness and thingling in my legs). Some days I cannot get out of bed, there are days where if I do not move enough my body locks into place and can only be moved if someone moves it for me. They will not do surgery because I have 4 levels of damage and if they do surgery I will have less flexibility and mobility in my back. They are waiting until I cannot move before they will do any surgeries. 

Some people honestly just cannot work. I cannot stand for over 10 minutes, or sit in one place for over 10 minutes. No one will hier me will all of medications in my system, I am a liability no employer will take on. It sucks, but that's just how it goes. You have to do what you have to do.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 19 on Jan. 19, 2013 at 12:06 PM



Quoting Aena:

I am disabled, and receive social security. I have a host of disabilites and would rather not talk about them except my back, I have degenerative disk disease, stenosis (narrowing of my spinal canal), radiculopathy (numbness and thingling in my legs). Some days I cannot get out of bed, there are days where if I do not move enough my body locks into place and can only be moved if someone moves it for me. They will not do surgery because I have 4 levels of damage and if they do surgery I will have less flexibility and mobility in my back. They are waiting until I cannot move before they will do any surgeries. 

Some people honestly just cannot work. I cannot stand for over 10 minutes, or sit in one place for over 10 minutes. No one will hier me will all of medications in my system, I am a liability no employer will take on. It sucks, but that's just how it goes. You have to do what you have to do.


That is me. Tuesday, I had a doctor's appointment and went to the grocery store after that. Those things put me in\ bed for 3 days. I feel like giving up.

Aena
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 12:12 PM

I feel so bad for you, I know what you are going through. Sometimes if I overdo it, I will also be in bed for days. I can be walking and my legs can just give out and I will fall, doesn't happen a lot but it does happen and it scares me that it may happen when I am not home.

Mine is so bad, when I have to go to the ER because I literally just lay in bed and cry, and cannot move the lower half of my body, they look my record up (all my tests were ran or sent to the same hospital), ask me if I am having the same symptoms, then tell me the only thing they can do is give me a pain shot. That is all they can do, and I hate it. I hate the fact that I cannot do my own damn dishes. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 19 on Jan. 19, 2013 at 12:13 PM
1 mom liked this


Before I became disabled, I was a training and employment coordinator for a job training program and worked with clients from the rehab commission. It is NOT easy to get a job when you have severe medical problems. First, many, if not most, employers are not going to hire you due to liability issues. Second, a person with severe medical problems needs a lot of time off for doctor appointments, therapy, etc. Third, being disabled does not mean you can't work for an hour or two every now and then, it means you cannot sustain gainful employment. I have a college degree...education does not help me stand, sit, walk, bend, remember things, type (I have typed enough for today and will have swollen hands for the rest of the day. Employers are also reluctant to hire disabled individuals because they don't want to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act because modifications could cost them thousands. No, there are not jobs for everone regardless of the condition. 

Quoting Anonymous:

I think that in most cases there are options for employment, even with a disability. There has to be something, somewhere that you can do. Not all jobs require that you work out of the home, not all jobs require that you be on your feet all day. I think, even if it means more schooling, there is likely a job out there for everyone, regardless of condition.



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