Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

A question about the stomach bug

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 7 Replies

So I recently was ill with that horrible stomach bug everyone has been getting, and this is a bit TMI and disgusting but I had a question.

I, like many of you, have been sick plenty of times in my life. This time seemed a bit different. After puking up the stomach contents, I puked bile which is green and yellow. 

After that it was that foamy white yellow.

But here is where the question is. After doing all of that my stomach should be empty right? Many hours into nothing in the stomach I started puking up liquid that was brownish. I have no idea what it could have been from being my stomach was clearly empty. Ideas?

Posted by Anonymous on Jan. 28, 2013 at 12:00 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-7):
HelloSweetie
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 12:00 PM

Bile

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Jan. 28, 2013 at 12:13 PM

Brown though after a stomach was empty?

Quoting HelloSweetie:

Bile


HelloSweetie
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 12:13 PM


bile

bile, bitter alkaline fluid of a yellow, brown, or green color, secreted, in man, by the liver. Bile, or gall, is composed of water, bile acids and their salts, bile pigments, cholesterol, fatty acids, and inorganic salts. In man it is stored in the gall bladder and, in response to the action of the hormone cholecystokinen (whose secretion by the intestine is stimulated by the presence of food), is secreted via the cystic and common ducts into the duodenum. The bile salts aid in digestion by emulsifying fats, enabling the absorption of fats and of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) through the intestinal wall. Since unabsorbed fats tend to coat other foods and prevent the action of digestive enzymes, adequate fat absorption mediated by bile salts is necessary for the complete digestion of food and the prevention of decomposition of partially digested foods by intestinal bacteria. The alkaline bile acts to neutralize the stomach acid in the small intestine, providing a more optimum environment for the pancreatic enzymes. The bile is a route of excretion for many drugs and metabolites; cholesterol is excreted almost entirely in the bile, as are breakdown products of heme, such as bilirubin, which color the bile and are known as the bile pigments. If the flow of bile is impeded by inflammation, gall stones, or other abnormality, digestive disturbances and frequently jaundice result.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2011, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:39 PM

I have had no gall bladder in years.

Quoting HelloSweetie:


bile

bile, bitter alkaline fluid of a yellow, brown, or green color, secreted, in man, by the liver. Bile, or gall, is composed of water, bile acids and their salts, bile pigments, cholesterol, fatty acids, and inorganic salts. In man it is stored in the gall bladder and, in response to the action of the hormone cholecystokinen (whose secretion by the intestine is stimulated by the presence of food), is secreted via the cystic and common ducts into the duodenum. The bile salts aid in digestion by emulsifying fats, enabling the absorption of fats and of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) through the intestinal wall. Since unabsorbed fats tend to coat other foods and prevent the action of digestive enzymes, adequate fat absorption mediated by bile salts is necessary for the complete digestion of food and the prevention of decomposition of partially digested foods by intestinal bacteria. The alkaline bile acts to neutralize the stomach acid in the small intestine, providing a more optimum environment for the pancreatic enzymes. The bile is a route of excretion for many drugs and metabolites; cholesterol is excreted almost entirely in the bile, as are breakdown products of heme, such as bilirubin, which color the bile and are known as the bile pigments. If the flow of bile is impeded by inflammation, gall stones, or other abnormality, digestive disturbances and frequently jaundice result.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2011, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.


HelloSweetie
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 9:06 PM

Well, your liver makes bile. The gallbladder just stored it.

Quoting Anonymous:

I have had no gall bladder in years.

Quoting HelloSweetie:


bile

bile, bitter alkaline fluid of a yellow, brown, or green color, secreted, in man, by the liver. Bile, or gall, is composed of water, bile acids and their salts, bile pigments, cholesterol, fatty acids, and inorganic salts. In man it is stored in the gall bladder and, in response to the action of the hormone cholecystokinen (whose secretion by the intestine is stimulated by the presence of food), is secreted via the cystic and common ducts into the duodenum. The bile salts aid in digestion by emulsifying fats, enabling the absorption of fats and of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) through the intestinal wall. Since unabsorbed fats tend to coat other foods and prevent the action of digestive enzymes, adequate fat absorption mediated by bile salts is necessary for the complete digestion of food and the prevention of decomposition of partially digested foods by intestinal bacteria. The alkaline bile acts to neutralize the stomach acid in the small intestine, providing a more optimum environment for the pancreatic enzymes. The bile is a route of excretion for many drugs and metabolites; cholesterol is excreted almost entirely in the bile, as are breakdown products of heme, such as bilirubin, which color the bile and are known as the bile pigments. If the flow of bile is impeded by inflammation, gall stones, or other abnormality, digestive disturbances and frequently jaundice result.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2011, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.



Anonymous
by Anonymous on Jan. 28, 2013 at 9:09 PM

I would bet it was some kind of alien egg that had implanted themselves in your stomach lining but it didn't take so it made you sick!

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Jan. 29, 2013 at 2:24 AM

OMG LOL

Quoting Anonymous:

I would bet it was some kind of alien egg that had implanted themselves in your stomach lining but it didn't take so it made you sick!


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)



Featured