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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Ulcers, Anyone?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 25 Replies

Have you ever had a peptic ulcer? Are there more than one type of ulcer in a GI tract? 

What were your symptoms? 

DISCLAIMER: Yes, I Googled it. Actually, what I googled was "over use of NSAIDs" because I use them every day. And lately, I have developed stomach issues. But they do not all line up with what I Googled. So, I would like real people advice. No I have not been to a doctor because I am not even sure anything is wrong at this point. 

Posted by Anonymous on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:23 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Cutenessmom
by Gold Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:25 PM

I had ulcers before due to gi issues and  medications Iwas on..

Cristie0911
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:26 PM

I had a duodenal ulcer due to "overuse of NSAIDS" after a surgery.  I didn't overuse them, I didn't even use them as prescribed.  I lost so much blood, my hemoglobin was down to a 5.5 and I needed multiple blood transfusions.  What do you need to know?

Nathans_mom0612
by Bronze Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:27 PM
I take nsaids very day as well. I am being tested in a few weeks for ulcerative colitis but i dont know if they are related.
Cristie0911
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:27 PM

I bled out and honestly, I had no pain to indicate that I was having an ulcer at all.

lisairv
by Platinum Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:27 PM

Google hpylori and see if you have those symptoms. It is the number one cause of ulcers. If it fits, you have to see a doctor very soon. It can cause stomach cancer.

lisairv
by Platinum Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:29 PM

H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori)

Stress, spicy foods, type A personality. Which of these causes most stomachulcers? The answer: none of them. Research shows that most ulcers -- 80% of stomach ulcers and 90% of those in the duodenum, the upper end of the small intestine -- develop because of infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).

How H. pylori Makes You Sick

H. pylori is a spiral-shaped bacterium commonly found in the stomach. The bacteria's shape and the way they move allow them to penetrate the stomach's protective mucous lining, where they produce substances that weaken the lining and make the stomach more susceptible to damage from gastric acids.

The bacteria can also attach to cells of the stomach, causing stomach inflammation (gastritis), and can stimulate the production of excess stomach acid. Over time, infection with the bacteria can also increase the risk of stomach cancer.

Although it is not known how H. pylori infection is spread, scientists believe it may be contracted through food and water. According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 20% of people under 40 years old and half of adults over 60 years old in the U.S. are infected, with higher rates in developing counrtries.

Symptoms of H. Pylori

Having H. pylori infection doesn't necessarily mean you'll have ulcers or develop stomach cancer. In fact, most people infected with the bacteria never have symptoms or problems such as ulcers. Only a small number of people with the infection develop stomach cancer. It's not clear why some infected people develop ulcers and others don't.

When H. pylori does cause symptoms, they are usually either symptoms of gastritis or peptic ulcer disease. The most common symptom of peptic ulcer disease is gnawing or burning abdominal pain, usually in the area just beneath the ribs. Thispain typically gets worse when your stomach is empty and improves when you eat food, drink milk, or take an antacid.

Other symptoms may include:

  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Bloating
  • Burping
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting (vomit may be bloody or look like coffee grounds)
  • Black, tarry stools

 

How H. pylori Is Diagnosed

Several types of tests are available to help diagnose H. pylori infection and/or ulcers. These include:

Upper GI (gastrointestinal) series. An X-ray of the upper GI tract -- theesophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Prior to the X-ray you must swallow a chalky liquid called barium, which makes ulcers show up on the X-ray.

Endoscopy. A procedure that involves snaking a thin, flexible tube with a camera down the esophagus, through the stomach, and into the small intestine to view the upper GI tract.

Blood test. A test that looks for antibodies in the blood that indicate exposure to H. pylori.

Stool test. A test that uses a small sample of stool to look for evidence of infection.

Urea breath test. A test used to check for the presence of a gas produced by the bacteria.

AngeLnChainZ
by Silver Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:30 PM

Nearly lost my father around 16 years ago from a stomach bleed due to a ruptured ulcer all because of daily use of an NSAID (Goody powders to be exact)

He had nothing more than stomach cramping and mild diarreah for a few days leading up to it, and then my mom found him unconscious bleeding uncontrollably from his bottom slumped over the toilet.

If you have ANY doubt, see a doctor they can go from nothing to life threatening in no time.

        

Cristie0911
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:30 PM

Yes, they will test you for H Pylori too and if you don't have that, it's more than likely NSAID induced.  NSAIDS are nothing to mess with, A woman in the hospital with me had a bleed out due to taking Naproxin sodium (Aleve) as directed.  She passed out behind the wheel while driving to Cleveland.  

xoxoDanicaxoxo
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:32 PM
They think that I have an ulcer, but I have a new symptom, swollen painful lymphnodes. I used nsaids everyday for years.
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Cristie0911
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:32 PM


Exactly, once you see blood appear in the stool or in the vomit, it's late.  You should get it checked out now.  I almost died, my breathing even became unregulated due  to all the blood loss.  I stopped being able to talk.  Please, take care of  this..

Quoting AngeLnChainZ:

Nearly lost my father around 16 years ago from a stomach bleed due to a ruptured ulcer all because of daily use of an NSAID (Goody powders to be exact)

He had nothing more than stomach cramping and mild diarreah for a few days leading up to it, and then my mom found him unconscious bleeding uncontrollably from his bottom slumped over the toilet.

If you have ANY doubt, see a doctor they can go from nothing to life threatening in no time.



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