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Nurses! What made you get into nursing?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
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What do you think someone needs to have in order to be successful in Nursing School and the Nursing field? I'm thinking some thoughts :) tyvm.

Posted by Anonymous on Jan. 31, 2013 at 5:49 PM
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Emt2Rn
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 6:15 PM
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What made me want to go into healthcare originally was my grandparents.  When I was in 3rd grade my maternal grandmother had a stroke, it affected some of her memory and how she formed sentences (she told my grandpa "No damnit, I don't want chicken, I want chicken!" when he was making her breakfast, obviously she meant she didn't want chicken, she wanted eggs).  As part of her recovery after coming home from the hospital, home health came out and would work with her physically and mentally.  During the days they weren't there, I was always excited to help grandma with her "homework," going over what certain items were (here is a hairbrush, it's used to brush your hair) and over pictures of her grandkids. After that I just wanted to help people.

IMO to be successful in Nursing school and in the field, you need to be compassionate, caring, have broad shoulders (for the days Doctors or family members want to blame you), at times you still have to be firm with people (patients, family members and co-workers even).  You need to be able to think critically (if you can a little, but you're worried about it, you do get A LOT of practice in school).  You also must be the type of person to be accountable for their actions.  I went to nursing school with at least one person who wanted to blame the instructor for her not getting good grades when she always showed up late, was on her phone and facebook during class, etc...

It is a job that I have a love, hate relationship with.  Even on the days that I "hate" everything that is going on, I still love my job.  A lot of doctors/surgeons you will work with have God complexes, but it makes you REALLY appreciate the ones that don't.  You must have patience as well.  When you have a 93 y/o with Alzheimers who keeps wanting to get out of bed with a broken hip and you have to tell her every 5-10 minutes that she broke her hip, hasn't had surgery yet, and have the same conversation about 100 times in a 12 hour shift, it takes A LOT of patience, which oddly enough, I don't have a lot of at home for my 25 y/o husband who leaves his dirty laundry on the floor...

You need to be willing to take things with a grain of salt.  I had a patient that when he was in pain, he got really hateful and cussed (a lot, almost worse than a sailor).  The first time I gave him pain medicine and it hit him he was apologizing like crazy.  I told him (which is the truth) I don't take it personally.  He was hurting, and it was his outlet.  He wasn't mad at me, I didn't make him hurt, he was just hurting.  So when people snap at you when they are sick or hurting, it may not be you at all, it's just you're there and are taking the brundt of it.

One last thing (althought I think this all only scracthes the surface of nursing), you can't look down upon nurse aides, and you must work along side them, not above them.  I worked as one for 3 years, and (2 of which where while I was in school).  There are nurses out there who believe that just because they have RN behind their name means they can't wipe a bottom, fill an ice pack or water pitcher or answer a call light.  I always felt under appreciated as an aide when I worked with certain nurses, and it wasn't until I became a nurse that I understood just how valuable nurse aides are.  Because I worked along side them for a few years, most of them understand that if I ask them to do something, or I don't help with something that is "aide" work, that it's not because I don't want to, it's because I have a more pressing issue.  Or it's because they've had a chance to take a smoke break or two and I'm still getting caught up on my work, lol.  It has been tough, sometimes, being on the same floor with the same aides I worked with, becaus there are times you have to tell them, "Listen, I'm the nurse and I need you to do this, don't question my judgment," like when they get pissed because you want an extra set of vitals on them.

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