Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Routine circumcision of babies.

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

There is NO medical reason for routine medical circumcision of boys or girls! Uncircumcised girls have more UTI's than uncircumcised boys, yet we just offer antibiotics **IF** they even develop an infection! Why would we do anything less for our sons?!  

It does not reduce the odds of contracting STD's or HIV- abstaining, having a monogamous relationship or using condoms do, whether the male is circumcised or not! A word to the wise, any medical professional who can have a discussion about reducing the spread of STD's and HIV without using the words "abstain" or "monogamous" or "condom" is trying to sell you something! 

You want baby to look like Dad... Why don't you start him Rogaine to get his hair fuller, before he even leaves the hospital or have rhinoplasty to make sure their noses match before you guys go home?! Those are cosmetic reasons and procedures- not medical.

You have a religious reason (practicing Judaism or Muslim. There is no valid reason, from a religious perspective, for a Christian to circumcise, as it was under Mosaic law, which is no longer practiced). Great. Under Mosaic law, circumcision happened on the eighth day and was a prick. A minor cut. The Hebrew word for circumcision is not "REMOVE" it is "TRIM". It was a small gesture of a covenant. Not the full removal of a functioning body part. That type of circumcision did not come around until much, much later during the Victorian Era. If a person is going to follow the laws set forth by God, why would they not practice in the way He saw fit, which was a small slit- not a medical circumcision- which is the full removal of the foreskin? Why would God create a part of the body in His image, to have cut off completely? Babies who had their entire foreskin removed during the time before Christ would have had extreme risk of infection and death, since there was not the access to clean water and sterlization of equipment or the ability to give a blood transfusion should the child bleed severely. This is further indication the form of medical circumcision we practice today, is not the same practiced in the Torah. 

That is all. For now. Have a great day! If you chose to, then that is your legal right to decide for your son, if you reside in the United States. Cool beans. Just know, that there are not medical reasons for this course of action and that it is merely a comestic procedure. I am not bashing. I circumcised my first son. I really, thought it was necessary. No, I have no bleedin' heart story of death and/or destruction and/or medical complications. It is something I wish I had not decided for him, once I did more research. If you have done your research and came to a different conclusion, then I wish you well and have no ill-intent. 


http://www.circumcision.org/aap.htm

http://www.drmomma.org/2009/11/jack-black-on-circumcision.html?m=1

http://www.laurelofleaves.com/2011/10/modern-circumcision-is-not-necessary-natural-or-biblical/  

http://barreloforanges.com/2012/07/17/the-unspoken-aspects-of-having-a-foreskin-a-guest-post-by-life-intact/  

http://www.facebook.com/groups/519580908070092/doc/519615404733309/

http://birthwithoutfearblog.com/2011/11/27/the-circumcision-decision/ 

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:41 PM
Replies (11-20):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:53 PM

DEFICIENCIES OF THE 2012 AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS REPORT ON CIRCUMCISION

  1. The AAP report conflicts with positions in other countries that recommend against circumcision or are discussing restricting it. Other countries recognize the inherent physical, sexual, and psychological harm of circumcision and that it violates medical ethics to cut off a natural, healthy, functioning body part.

  2. The effects of circumcision pain and changes in infant behavior after circumcision are not mentioned in the AAP report. Studies show that circumcision is significantly painful, traumatic, and affects the brain as evidenced by large increases in heart rate, blood pressure, and stress hormone levels during circumcision. Some infants do not cry because they go into shock. After circumcision there are changes in infant behavior, sleep patterns, activity level, more irritability, and there are disruptions in mother-child bonding and feeding. Anesthetics, if used, consist of injections into the penis and do not eliminate circumcision pain.

  3. All circumcision risks and ethical objections to circumcision are not mentioned in the AAP report. Circumcision has about two dozen surgical risks including, in rare cases, death. Some doctors and nurses refuse to perform or assist with circumcisions because of ethical considerations.

  4. The AAP report does not mention the anatomy and functions of the foreskinBased on medical studies, circumcision removes up to one-half of the erogenous tissue on the penile shaft. The adult foreskin is a double layer, a movable sleeve equivalent to approximately twelve square inches. Medical studies have shown that the foreskin protects the penile head, enhances sexual pleasure, and facilitates intercourse. (Common sense check: If the AAP used common sense, they would realize that missing twelve square inches of erogenous tissue would have an adverse effect on sexual function.)

  5. The AAP report does not examine the connection between circumcision and erectile dysfunction though it is reported in the medical literature. Cutting off the foreskin removes several kinds of specialized nerves and results in the thickening and progressive desensitization of exposed erogenous tissue that would normally be protected by the foreskin. In a 2011 survey, circumcised men were 4.5 times more likely than those who were not circumcised to use an erectile dysfunction drug.

Quoting IloveNCIS:

Why it's done

By Mayo Clinic staff

Circumcision is a religious or cultural ritual for many Jewish and Islamic families, as well as certain aboriginal tribes in Africa and Australia. Circumcision can also be a matter of family tradition, personal hygiene or preventive health care. Sometimes there's a medical need for circumcision, such as when the foreskin is too tight to be pulled back (retracted) over the glans. In other cases, particularly in certain parts of Africa, circumcision is recommended for older boys or men to reduce the risk of certain sexually transmitted infections.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says the benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. However, the AAP doesn't recommend routine circumcision for all male newborns. The AAP leaves the circumcision decision up to parents — and supports use of anesthetics for infants who have the procedure.

Circumcision might have various health benefits, including:

  • Easier hygiene. Circumcision makes it simpler to wash the penis. Washing beneath the foreskin of an uncircumcised penis is generally easy, however.
  • Decreased risk of urinary tract infections. The overall risk of urinary tract infections in males is low, but these infections are more common in uncircumcised males. Severe infections early in life can lead to kidney problems later on.
  • Decreased risk of sexually transmitted infections. Circumcised men might have a lower risk of certain sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Still, safe sexual practices remain essential.
  • Prevention of penile problems. Occasionally, the foreskin on an uncircumcised penis can be difficult or impossible to retract (phimosis). This can lead to inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis.
  • Decreased risk of penile cancer. Although cancer of the penis is rare, it's less common in circumcised men. In addition, cervical cancer is less common in the female sexual partners of circumcised men.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/circumcision/MY01023/DSECTION=why-its-done. I think I will listen to the Mayo clinic over the websites you provided.........Really Facebook?


Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:54 PM
2 moms liked this
Lol@ your biased resources full of propaganda that wouldn't even be deemed permissible to use in a high school term paper lmfao
tarakay0417
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:54 PM
2 moms liked this
This is why my sons are/will be circ'ed.

Quoting IloveNCIS:

Why it's done


By Mayo Clinic staff


Circumcision is a religious or cultural ritual for many Jewish and Islamic families, as well as certain aboriginal tribes in Africa and Australia. Circumcision can also be a matter of family tradition, personal hygiene or preventive health care. Sometimes there's a medical need for circumcision, such as when the foreskin is too tight to be pulled back (retracted) over the glans. In other cases, particularly in certain parts of Africa, circumcision is recommended for older boys or men to reduce the risk of certain sexually transmitted infections.


The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says the benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. However, the AAP doesn't recommend routine circumcision for all male newborns. The AAP leaves the circumcision decision up to parents — and supports use of anesthetics for infants who have the procedure.


Circumcision might have various health benefits, including:



  • Easier hygiene. Circumcision makes it simpler to wash the penis. Washing beneath the foreskin of an uncircumcised penis is generally easy, however.

  • Decreased risk of urinary tract infections. The overall risk of urinary tract infections in males is low, but these infections are more common in uncircumcised males. Severe infections early in life can lead to kidney problems later on.

  • Decreased risk of sexually transmitted infections. Circumcised men might have a lower risk of certain sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Still, safe sexual practices remain essential.

  • Prevention of penile problems. Occasionally, the foreskin on an uncircumcised penis can be difficult or impossible to retract (phimosis). This can lead to inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis.

  • Decreased risk of penile cancer. Although cancer of the penis is rare, it's less common in circumcised men. In addition, cervical cancer is less common in the female sexual partners of circumcised men.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/circumcision/MY01023/DSECTION=why-its-done. I think I will listen to the Mayo clinic over the websites you provided.........Really Facebook?



Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:54 PM

  1. were 4.5 times more likely than those who were not circumcised to use an erectile dysfunction drug.

  2. The AAP report does not mention psychological harm. Some dissatisfied men report wide-rangingpsychological consequences of circumcision including anger, a sense of loss and sadness, and sexual anxieties. Reduced emotional expression and the avoidance of intimacy may also be related to circumcision. 

    Most circumcised men may seem satisfied because they accept cultural beliefs about circumcision and may not understand what circumcision is and the benefits of the foreskin. They may suppress certain feelings about circumcision because they are too painful. They also may not disclose these feelings due to fear of being dismissed or ridiculed.

  3. The AAP report is influenced by personal, cultural, financial, and professional conflicts of interest. These factors include committee members' circumcision status, number of circumcisions performed, circumcision status of any male children, and religious or ethnic background.

  4. The AAP report inflates the potential benefits by stating in its summary, for example, that circumcision "prevents" penile cancer. A closer look at the report text shows that the incidence of penile cancer is 0.58 case in 100,000 in the United States, where circumcision is common, and 0.82 case in 100,000 in Denmark, where circumcision is rare. According to studies cited in the report, between 909 and 322,000 circumcisions would be required to prevent one case of penile cancer. (Common sense check: Do these numbers support circumcision to "prevent" penile cancer?)

  5. The AAP report inflates the potential benefits by stating in its summary, for example, that circumcision "prevents" urinary tract infection (UTI). The report text states, "Given that the risk of UTI among this population [boys under age 2] is approximately 1%, the number needed to circumcise to prevent UTI is approximately 100." Therefore, 99 boys out of 100 receive no UTI "benefit" from circumcision. UTI is treatable with antibiotics. Good medical practice requires the least intrusive form of effective treatment. All the claimed "preventive health benefits" are debatable and insignificant.

  6. "Preventive [or potential] health benefits" are not actual health benefits. The overwhelming majority of males who are not circumcised will not get these infections or diseases. Therefore, circumcision does not give them any health benefit.

Quoting IloveNCIS:

Why it's done

By Mayo Clinic staff

Circumcision is a religious or cultural ritual for many Jewish and Islamic families, as well as certain aboriginal tribes in Africa and Australia. Circumcision can also be a matter of family tradition, personal hygiene or preventive health care. Sometimes there's a medical need for circumcision, such as when the foreskin is too tight to be pulled back (retracted) over the glans. In other cases, particularly in certain parts of Africa, circumcision is recommended for older boys or men to reduce the risk of certain sexually transmitted infections.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says the benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. However, the AAP doesn't recommend routine circumcision for all male newborns. The AAP leaves the circumcision decision up to parents — and supports use of anesthetics for infants who have the procedure.

Circumcision might have various health benefits, including:

  • Easier hygiene. Circumcision makes it simpler to wash the penis. Washing beneath the foreskin of an uncircumcised penis is generally easy, however.
  • Decreased risk of urinary tract infections. The overall risk of urinary tract infections in males is low, but these infections are more common in uncircumcised males. Severe infections early in life can lead to kidney problems later on.
  • Decreased risk of sexually transmitted infections. Circumcised men might have a lower risk of certain sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Still, safe sexual practices remain essential.
  • Prevention of penile problems. Occasionally, the foreskin on an uncircumcised penis can be difficult or impossible to retract (phimosis). This can lead to inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis.
  • Decreased risk of penile cancer. Although cancer of the penis is rare, it's less common in circumcised men. In addition, cervical cancer is less common in the female sexual partners of circumcised men.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/circumcision/MY01023/DSECTION=why-its-done. I think I will listen to the Mayo clinic over the websites you provided.........Really Facebook?


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:55 PM

  1. Professionals have challenged many studies cited by the AAP report. For example, the AAP report mentions studies that claim reduced HIV transmission in Africa for circumcised men. However, (1) About 60 circumcisions were required to prevent one HIV infection. (2) The studies did not seek to determine the source of the HIV infections. Most HIV infections in Africa are transmitted by contaminated injections and surgical procedures. (3) The studies were not consistent with other evidence. (4) In Europe, where circumcision is rare, there is no increase in the incidence of HIV transmission. (5) Studies of African adults cannot be applicable to American infants.

  2. In its discussion of over three pages attempting to show that circumcision reduces STDs, the AAP report does not mention the word "condom." Condoms are much more effective (99%) than circumcision, less invasive, much less costly, and they protect women from infection. (Common sense check: If a condom is better than circumcision, why circumcise?)

  3. The AAP report even attempts to make an issue of penile hygiene. In all previous AAP reports, hygiene is not an issue. For example, according to the 1999 report, "there is little evidence to affirm the association between circumcision status and optimal penile hygiene."

  4. The AAP report ignores serious ethical questions connected with cutting off an important, healthy, and irreplaceable part of a child's body without medical justification

    • The AAP Committee on Bioethics report states, "Pediatric health care providers … have legal and ethical duties to their child patients to render competent medical care based on what the patient needs, not what someone else expresses… .[T]he pediatrician's responsibilities to his or her patient exist independent of parental desires or proxy consent." For these reasons, some physicians and nurses refuse to circumcise for ethical reasons. Yet the AAP report concluded that it is "legitimate" to circumcise if the parent requests it for nonmedical reasons. These two reports of the AAP are in conflict. This office wrote to a member of the AAP Committee on Bioethics requesting comment on this conflict. No response was received. (See bottom of page with letter to Susan Blank, Chair of the AAP Task Force on Circumcision. 
    • Circumcision violates the Golden Rule. Adults would not consent to having a healthy genital part cut off, with or without pain medication. Yet adults put a helpless, vulnerable, sensitive newborn child through this painful ordeal. 
    • According to an article in the medical literature, circumcision violates all seven principles of Medical Ethics. (Denniston, G., "Circumcision and the Code of Ethics," Humane Health Care International 12 (1996): 72-74) 
  5. The AAP report lacks balance. It uses much more space discussing potential benefits as compared to potential harms. This is consistent with their "Statement of the Issue" which only refers to "possible benefits" and ignores harms. The "Literature Search Overview" also ignores topics and questions related to harms, which are different from risks and complications.
Quoting IloveNCIS:

Why it's done

By Mayo Clinic staff

Circumcision is a religious or cultural ritual for many Jewish and Islamic families, as well as certain aboriginal tribes in Africa and Australia. Circumcision can also be a matter of family tradition, personal hygiene or preventive health care. Sometimes there's a medical need for circumcision, such as when the foreskin is too tight to be pulled back (retracted) over the glans. In other cases, particularly in certain parts of Africa, circumcision is recommended for older boys or men to reduce the risk of certain sexually transmitted infections.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says the benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. However, the AAP doesn't recommend routine circumcision for all male newborns. The AAP leaves the circumcision decision up to parents — and supports use of anesthetics for infants who have the procedure.

Circumcision might have various health benefits, including:

  • Easier hygiene. Circumcision makes it simpler to wash the penis. Washing beneath the foreskin of an uncircumcised penis is generally easy, however.
  • Decreased risk of urinary tract infections. The overall risk of urinary tract infections in males is low, but these infections are more common in uncircumcised males. Severe infections early in life can lead to kidney problems later on.
  • Decreased risk of sexually transmitted infections. Circumcised men might have a lower risk of certain sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Still, safe sexual practices remain essential.
  • Prevention of penile problems. Occasionally, the foreskin on an uncircumcised penis can be difficult or impossible to retract (phimosis). This can lead to inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis.
  • Decreased risk of penile cancer. Although cancer of the penis is rare, it's less common in circumcised men. In addition, cervical cancer is less common in the female sexual partners of circumcised men.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/circumcision/MY01023/DSECTION=why-its-done. I think I will listen to the Mayo clinic over the websites you provided.........Really Facebook?


LadyF86
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:55 PM
1 mom liked this

 Ummm, I do not think my son's penis is any of your damn business. Why the fu!$ do you care what other choose to do? Get a hobby.

BrittSam2011
by Platinum Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:56 PM

Just because the Old Testament isn't 'practiced' by most modern day Christians (by the way, the 10 commandments are in the Old Testament) doesn't mean it Shouldn't be practiced. And trimming the forskin is what circumcision does. It's not like they're cutting off the penis.

I'm a Christian and circumcised all 3 of my boys because God told us to in that big instruction book to life called The Bible.

Just an FYI.

kblossom20
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:56 PM
1 mom liked this

Lol if it bothers you so much, DON'T circumcise YOUR kid. Preaching a bunch of crap anonymously isn't going to change peoples personal views. 

I will be circumcising my son when he's born. It's neater, cleaner and my personal choice to do so.

:) 

Lilypie Pregnancy tickers

s.osborne
by Gold Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:57 PM

 LOL nice

Quoting SterlingHeart:

why do you care if my son has a foreskin?   Don't you need to clean behind your fridge or something?  

 

LucyHourglass
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:57 PM
1 mom liked this

my boy isnt circumsized, and even i'm too tired for this nonsense.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN