Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Has anyone been on PA while they went back to school?

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
Has anyone received TANF while they went back to school full time?

Yes, I am asking for myself. I am barely making ends meet because jobs are hard to come by in my town and I can't get anything above minimum wage with my high shool diploma. Yes, I would be ashamed to be on welfare and I know there are going to be people who bash me but I can't be concerned with you because I'm just trying to better myself and give my son a better life.
Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 1, 2013 at 10:23 PM
Replies (41-50):
NEMommaOf3
by Give Thanks on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:07 AM
Here in Maine they have a program called PaS parents as scholars JUST for TANF recipients to go to school and better themselves: child-care, money for fixing or getting a car, partial tuition, gas money, books paid for, eyecare and glasses if needed...look into something like that in your state. I went back to school on it and now have a teaching degree. Best thing I ever did.

Ignore the bashers. Best of luck and kudos on being a great example to your little one!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:10 AM
Quoting tossed:

Are you going for hair dressing? The problem with trade schools (ATI, ITT, etc) is that they are EXTREMELY expensive and a person has to take out huge loans in addition to their PELL grants just to pay the tuition/fees. Frequently, the people who graduate don't end up with decent paying jobs and have huge loans to repay. My son is going through a community college for a degree in respiratory therapy. He will graduate this summer (right after his 20th birthday) and will be able to start at about $25 an hour. If I had more money, he would not have needed to take out loans because the PELL would pay for tuition and fees, but he took out loans to help with living expenses. With his expected salary, he will be able to repay the loans.

I used to coordinate a training and employment program that covered people from at risk high school students, to welfare moms, to white collar workers. The people I had who were interested in trade schools thought it was great that they would get out in a year, but NEVER got good paying jobs. Sorry, just the way it goes. There may be rare exceptions, but I had to monitor all of the schools in the Dallas area and saw it all of the time.



I'm sorry, I'm just ignorant of all of the options out there. So would you recommend a program at a community college? I appreciate your advice.
luvhubandbabys
by Silver Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:12 AM

School part time but still work.

You should qualify for some grants.

Get good grades and apply for scholarships.

It will take longer but it will be worth it.

I would not quit your job just yet.

Community colleges are cheaper and most offer some online classes which should help with any childcare issues you might have.

Lots of people work and go to school. I think its the better way you wont have gaps in work history.. My husband works full time, is a volunteer basketball coach and goes to school part time. Plus we have 3 under 4. Its crazy sometimes but it works. You can do it.

mama2sqgl
by Bronze Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:14 AM
3 moms liked this

It doesn't really matter what you think. I dont look at a person and wonder if they have been or on PA. I am fully aware that taxes pay for more that just PA and no she didn't have any federal funding for her education, the woman will be paying student loans till god knows when.  I dont care if a person got PA to make a better life for themselves, Im am pretty sure the parents of the children who go into the pediatric ER she works in dont care either. All that matters is she knows what she is doing and is damn good at her job.

Quoting ElitestJen:



Quoting mama2sqgl:

I completely agree with yummy.. My sister in law went on PA while she was in nursing school. We have talked about the fact that she knows she has paid more in taxes back since she has finished school and became an RN then she ever received on PA. You do what you need to do. Good Luck in school.

So?  Millions of people pay taxes every year and have never received public assistance.  Taxes pay for more than just public assistance....and I'm sure she benefits from them still.  The difference is....she's double dipped.  Public assistance AND schools AND roads AND federal student aid AND.......

I'm sure she hasn't given more than she's received.  The public assistance made her cost to society higher.



tossed
by Ruby Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:15 AM


Let's start with what you want to do? Do you have a high school diploma? How are your basic skills like math, English, reading? 

Quoting Anonymous:

Quoting tossed:

Are you going for hair dressing? The problem with trade schools (ATI, ITT, etc) is that they are EXTREMELY expensive and a person has to take out huge loans in addition to their PELL grants just to pay the tuition/fees. Frequently, the people who graduate don't end up with decent paying jobs and have huge loans to repay. My son is going through a community college for a degree in respiratory therapy. He will graduate this summer (right after his 20th birthday) and will be able to start at about $25 an hour. If I had more money, he would not have needed to take out loans because the PELL would pay for tuition and fees, but he took out loans to help with living expenses. With his expected salary, he will be able to repay the loans.

I used to coordinate a training and employment program that covered people from at risk high school students, to welfare moms, to white collar workers. The people I had who were interested in trade schools thought it was great that they would get out in a year, but NEVER got good paying jobs. Sorry, just the way it goes. There may be rare exceptions, but I had to monitor all of the schools in the Dallas area and saw it all of the time.



I'm sorry, I'm just ignorant of all of the options out there. So would you recommend a program at a community college? I appreciate your advice.



Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:16 AM
Quoting ElitestJen:

You chose to struggle. You didn't *have* to struggle. You made a series of decisions that led to your struggle. Own it. Take responsibility.

I don't drive a fancy car. I also don't expect others to support me because I was too selfish to support myself.



You know nothing about me. You don't know what kind of home I grew up in or any of my circumstances. The fact is, I *do* struggle and I want to change that. From the way you talk it seems like you've never experienced very many hardships in your life. Good for you. We aren't all that lucky.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:21 AM
Quoting tossed:

Let's start with what you want to do? Do you have a high school diploma? How are your basic skills like math, English, reading?



Yes, I have a diploma. My English and reading skills are excellent, but my math isn't that great. I would be interested in something with computers maybe? I don't know if my math skills are up to par though. I don't think I have the stomach for nursing. Other than that, I'm pretty creative and crafty. I am the master of getting something for .25 cents at the thrift store and turning it into something beautiful. :)
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:25 AM
Quoting NEMommaOf3:

Here in Maine they have a program called PaS parents as scholars JUST for TANF recipients to go to school and better themselves: child-care, money for fixing or getting a car, partial tuition, gas money, books paid for, eyecare and glasses if needed...look into something like that in your state. I went back to school on it and now have a teaching degree. Best thing I ever did.

Ignore the bashers. Best of luck and kudos on being a great example to your little one!



I read an article on that a while back! It seems like my state is a little more strict about it though. It doesn't seem like you can go to a four year university, just a 12 month vocational program but I'm going to try and sit down with someone on Monday and find out.

Way to go on your teaching degree! That's great!
Nolanzo
by Silver Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:27 AM
Idk what the rules are where you live, but here, you won't qualify for cash assistance if you are not working at all... If you are able-bodied, they put you in a work program and its 35+ hours per week for a maximum monthly benefit of $365. The only way you could swing that here is if you did the work assignments during the day and went to school full time at night.

They make it VERY difficult to qualify.. You basically have to be disabled or with dependents under age 1 to be exempt from the work program. School doesn't count as an exemption.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
tossed
by Ruby Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:29 AM
1 mom liked this


Some states have state vocational schools. These are different from the private schools like ATI. You earn a certificate or diploma depending on your program. There is also the community college route. Community colleges have various options as well. You can seek a degree or a certificate in regular credit classes. They also have continuing ed classes, but that does not sound like what you need. I think you should go meet with a counselor and take their admission  and placement tests to see where you stand. Traditionally, you have to take placement tests in math, English, and reading. The results will tell you if you need to take remedial courses. A counselor can tell you what your options are and how long it will take to complete a program.  You will also need to meet with a financial aid counselor. There are different programs available to help with the costs of school ranging from scholarships to grants to loans. Once you decide what you want to do, you might also consider visiting your state employment office. They administer some training money that will help pay for school to train in demand occupations. The programs go by different names, but they can help you with that. You may be able to get assistance with day care expenses while in school. Some community colleges have on campus day care as well. The first thing is to research different fields. Talk to some of the students in the programs and see how they like the program. 

Quoting Anonymous:

Quoting tossed:

Let's start with what you want to do? Do you have a high school diploma? How are your basic skills like math, English, reading?



Yes, I have a diploma. My English and reading skills are excellent, but my math isn't that great. I would be interested in something with computers maybe? I don't know if my math skills are up to par though. I don't think I have the stomach for nursing. Other than that, I'm pretty creative and crafty. I am the master of getting something for .25 cents at the thrift store and turning it into something beautiful. :)



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN