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Smoking while pregnant and it's effects

My bff just found out she is preggo after 7 years of trying. Also just found out she is RH-, which they say may or may not affect her and her baby. But she called very worried about it. She went on to pose the question, "How come women who smoke and drink during pregnancy seem to have no issues having babies, but women who do it right have all the problems?" I thought about it. It's a good question. But a better question is why do people who smoke during pregnancy not see the effects it has on their babies? I have 5 women in my family who smoked during pregnancy. 8 of the 11 children have problems. My niece has 2 girls, she smoked during both pregnancies, both have breathing problems and require breathing machines. Her sister smoked for all 3 of her pregnancies, 2 of 3 require a breathing machine. My cousin smoked during 2 of her 3 pregnancies. The oldest is fine, she didn't smoke with him. The middle needs a breathing machine, and the youngest died of sids at 5 weeks. The doctor thinks it was not only because she smoked while pregnant, but also around her kids after they were born. My younger SIL smoked with both pregnancies, my older nephew has no problems, my younger nephew has asthma and has had pneumonia 3 times (He just turned 1). My older SIL just has my niece, she delivered her 10 weeks premature and at a VERY low birth rate. She almost died, but now needs an inhaler on a daily basis. Too me this is concrete evidence that smoking while pregnant is stupid, selfish and dangerous. Why don't people see what it's doing to their kids? There are warnings everywhere about the dangers on smoking while pregnant. I guess people are just selfish.

by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 5:33 PM
Replies (71-74):
Mrs.Torres2566
by Mrs.T on Feb. 4, 2013 at 7:16 PM

Body and Lungs:

Undersized babies tend to have under developed bodies. Their lungs may not be able to work on their own, which means they may spend their first days or weeks attatched to a respirator. After they're breathing on their own (or even if they did from the start), these babies may have continuing breathing problems--because of delayed lung developement or other adverse effects of nicotine. Children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are especially vulnerable to asthma, and have double or even triple the risk of SIDS.

Quoting Luna091306:

 I'm confused as to how smoking while pregnant later leads to lung or breathing issues with the child. The lungs are not used nor fully developed inside the womb. The baby receives oxygen from the mothers blood which is filtered through the placenta. Obviously, some bad things will get through but wouldn't all organs be affected, not just the lungs? I'm wondering if these kids with breathing issues aren't later exposed to secondhand smoke because the parents smoke indoors which leads to their breathing issues.

Maybe someone can explain it to me?


Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 7:50 PM



Quoting Anonymous:

The mom in the comment you're talking shit about though almost had a miscarriage when she tried to quit, that's why what I quoted is relevant. Everyone is different and that includes every unborn child; if she almost lost her baby when she was quitting and her doctor told her to just cut back and keep it to 5 a day then she is not a bad mother. 


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:


HEAVY SMOKERS

Women who smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day are cautioned to quit gradually in the first trimester of pregnancy. Stress and nicotine withdrawal symptoms may increase the risk of miscarriage. Smoking five or fewer cigarettes per day is associated with minimal risk during pregnancy.

From - 

Ten Smoking Tobacco While Pregnant | LIVESTRONG.COM


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

Yeah, she should have just let those babies die from shock, she would have been a much better mother that way lol Moron.


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

I smoked with all 4 of my kids and none of them have any breathing problems and they were all big babies. I think maybe it depends on how much you smoke, and if you smoke inside breathing in that 2nd hand carbon dioxide. I tried to quit with my first and the shock made me almost miscarry, so the doc told me to just cut back to 5 a day to keep the baby from going though with drawls... I went ahead and did the same for the rest of my pregnancies as well and none of their doctors had any problems with it, they all encouraged it.


Mom of the Year, here.




A) She's full of shit.

B) If you're going to insult someone's intelligence, you may want to learn when to capitalize your insults.



Quitting gradually and continuing to smoke throughout pregnancy aren't synonyms.  I can copy and paste, too:



Myth: “My doctor said not to quit cold turkey because it is dangerous to my baby”. Fact: Not true. Quitting smoking in pregnancy is safer for you and your baby than continuing to smoke.

Myth: “If I cut down the number of cigarettes I smoke per day, I won’t do as much harm to myself or my baby”.

Fact: Cutting down on the number of cigarettes smoked per day is a great accomplishment, and can be used as a way to help you get started on your quit plan. However, it does not help to protect you or your baby from the harm caused by smoking. 





It could've been totally unrelated.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 7:53 PM

She was more inclined to trust her doctor, it seems, than some random woman on the interwebs.


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

The mom in the comment you're talking shit about though almost had a miscarriage when she tried to quit, that's why what I quoted is relevant. Everyone is different and that includes every unborn child; if she almost lost her baby when she was quitting and her doctor told her to just cut back and keep it to 5 a day then she is not a bad mother. 


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:


HEAVY SMOKERS

Women who smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day are cautioned to quit gradually in the first trimester of pregnancy. Stress and nicotine withdrawal symptoms may increase the risk of miscarriage. Smoking five or fewer cigarettes per day is associated with minimal risk during pregnancy.

From - 

Ten Smoking Tobacco While Pregnant | LIVESTRONG.COM


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

Yeah, she should have just let those babies die from shock, she would have been a much better mother that way lol Moron.


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

I smoked with all 4 of my kids and none of them have any breathing problems and they were all big babies. I think maybe it depends on how much you smoke, and if you smoke inside breathing in that 2nd hand carbon dioxide. I tried to quit with my first and the shock made me almost miscarry, so the doc told me to just cut back to 5 a day to keep the baby from going though with drawls... I went ahead and did the same for the rest of my pregnancies as well and none of their doctors had any problems with it, they all encouraged it.


Mom of the Year, here.




A) She's full of shit.

B) If you're going to insult someone's intelligence, you may want to learn when to capitalize your insults.



Quitting gradually and continuing to smoke throughout pregnancy aren't synonyms.  I can copy and paste, too:



Myth: “My doctor said not to quit cold turkey because it is dangerous to my baby”. Fact: Not true. Quitting smoking in pregnancy is safer for you and your baby than continuing to smoke.

Myth: “If I cut down the number of cigarettes I smoke per day, I won’t do as much harm to myself or my baby”.

Fact: Cutting down on the number of cigarettes smoked per day is a great accomplishment, and can be used as a way to help you get started on your quit plan. However, it does not help to protect you or your baby from the harm caused by smoking. 





It could've been totally unrelated.



Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 8:33 PM



Quoting Anonymous:

She was more inclined to trust her doctor, it seems, than some random woman on the interwebs.


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

The mom in the comment you're talking shit about though almost had a miscarriage when she tried to quit, that's why what I quoted is relevant. Everyone is different and that includes every unborn child; if she almost lost her baby when she was quitting and her doctor told her to just cut back and keep it to 5 a day then she is not a bad mother. 


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:


HEAVY SMOKERS

Women who smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day are cautioned to quit gradually in the first trimester of pregnancy. Stress and nicotine withdrawal symptoms may increase the risk of miscarriage. Smoking five or fewer cigarettes per day is associated with minimal risk during pregnancy.

From - 

Ten Smoking Tobacco While Pregnant | LIVESTRONG.COM


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

Yeah, she should have just let those babies die from shock, she would have been a much better mother that way lol Moron.


Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

I smoked with all 4 of my kids and none of them have any breathing problems and they were all big babies. I think maybe it depends on how much you smoke, and if you smoke inside breathing in that 2nd hand carbon dioxide. I tried to quit with my first and the shock made me almost miscarry, so the doc told me to just cut back to 5 a day to keep the baby from going though with drawls... I went ahead and did the same for the rest of my pregnancies as well and none of their doctors had any problems with it, they all encouraged it.


Mom of the Year, here.




A) She's full of shit.

B) If you're going to insult someone's intelligence, you may want to learn when to capitalize your insults.



Quitting gradually and continuing to smoke throughout pregnancy aren't synonyms.  I can copy and paste, too:



Myth: “My doctor said not to quit cold turkey because it is dangerous to my baby”. Fact: Not true. Quitting smoking in pregnancy is safer for you and your baby than continuing to smoke.

Myth: “If I cut down the number of cigarettes I smoke per day, I won’t do as much harm to myself or my baby”.

Fact: Cutting down on the number of cigarettes smoked per day is a great accomplishment, and can be used as a way to help you get started on your quit plan. However, it does not help to protect you or your baby from the harm caused by smoking. 





It could've been totally unrelated.




Or more likely to believe what she wants to believe.  I'm going with the CDC.

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