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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

[[[[[2/5/13 EDIT AT VERY BOTTOM]]]]] Kids with peanut allergies

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 237 Replies
2 moms liked this

I don't get it.  Why ruin it for the entire preschool that your kid has a peanut allergy?  Can't he/she sit at a separate table since he/she's so allergic?

I mean, if your kid is allergic but it's MY kid's lunch...what's the problem?

So I told the preschool director my child would bring ALMOND butter sammies from now on...and she STILL said it was unacceptable.

Just venting...

________________________

*I had NO idea that the scintilla scent of a peanut on the other side of the room would/could cause a child with this dysfunction to die or something like that.

I appreciate the moms who were polite about teaching me about it, though.  So now I know!

I feel bad for your kids, though...the ones with the allergies to peanuts like that.  Peanuts are everywhere in America. 

As your child grows and goes to soccer games or sleepovers, it's going to be awfully difficult to manage the scent of peanuts.

________________________________________

Quoting Momniscient:

It is my kid brother. And anaphylactic reactions are actually rare. Therefore, he is/was armed to the teeth with knowledge, medical interventions and his teachers, admin and nurses as well as his good friends and parents are all well aware of the allergy.

I believe it is actually more dangerous to try to go peanut free. It creates a false sense of security and leads to being complacent.

A school can try but they will fail to be truly allergen free and then the kid walks outside... into a world of allergens.

______________________________

Quote:

A commonly held belief is that the odor from peanut products such as peanut butter can result in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. There are, in fact, a number of case reports in the medical literature of patients who report symptoms of difficulty breathing, chest tightness, skin rashes, itching, and various other symptoms—all from smelling peanut butter or being in the presence of peanut products. However, a recent blinded, placebo-controlled trial of children exposed to open peanut butter was unable to document any reactions (Sicherer et al).

Based on these reports of allergic reactions resulting from “inhalation”, many parents express concern that the mere presence of any peanut product can contaminate the surrounding airborne environment resulting in an entire room or area being unsafe for a child with peanut allergy. In evaluating these reactions from “airborne exposure,” it is important to remember several facts.

First, allergic reactions to food are triggered by specific food proteins. Without contact with protein, there is no allergic reaction.

Second, food particles containing proteins become airborne through several mechanisms. This can be through grinding and pulverization. For example, the mass shelling of peanuts can result in a cloud of peanut particles which then can be dispersed by the wind. Another mechanism is through the release of peanut particles under pressure, such as occurs with the simultaneous opening of hundreds of peanut snacks in a pressurized airplane cabin. The presence of peanut protein in the filters of commercial airliners was documented in a study from the Mayo Clinic in 1996, confirming the possibility of airborne exposure.

Food proteins also can be aerosolized into a vapor phase from the high heating conditions of cooking such as with steaming, boiling, and frying. This is one of the more common ways for food protein to become airborne. Workers in the food industry, involved in food handling, processing, preparation, and cooking, often develop occupational allergies to the foods with which they work.

Airborne exposure consists of small amounts of food protein which can trigger allergic reactions, usually dermatologic or respiratory symptoms. There are case reports of severe asthma from airborne exposure to food but the typical inhalation reaction would be similar to that suffered by a cat-allergic person exposed to a cat walking into a room: itchy eyes, sneezing, and runny nose. The chance of a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction from airborne exposure is very small.

Can the anon who posted that please give me the link?  I'd like to take it to the preschool.  Thx!

_________________________________________________

2/5/13 EDIT:

I spoke with the preschool teacher one-on-one last night after picking up my child from preschool.

Apparently, this child has had known peanut allergies since the beginning of the pre-K school year (end of August), and the only restriction to peanuts was for the child who was allergic to them.  The teachers were not allowed to feed him any snacks containing peanuts.

Yesterday, however, a new aide handed out peanut butter granola bars.  She handed one to the child with peanut allergies.  He did not eat it.  Another teacher saw what happened and said, "This one's got allergies to peanuts.  He needs some carrots instead."  So they gave him carrots.  But the child had placed the pb granola bar (still in the wrapper) inside his pants pocket and took it home that afternoon when his mom came to get him.

Obviously, she called the school upset that one had even been handed to him...but he hadn't eaten it.  Crises averted.

BUT...the mother was so irate that now there are posters saying "This is a peanut-free school zone," and a mass emailing went out to all parents, of which I was one. 

Anyhow, upon talking to the director of the preschool, she said lots of children brought PB sammies to school, even baggies of nuts, to school and there was never one time an issue with the child "smelling" the peanuts and going into shock.  In fact, he never once broke out in a rash or hives from being in a classroom with children who did eat peanuts.

This entire school year (5 months now), this child with peanut allergies has not suffered one adverse incident from peanut "scent" or "oils" being in the preschool.

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:06 PM
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Replies (1-10):
peanutsmommy1
by Ruby Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:08 PM
2 moms liked this
Ah yes, because a child who has airborn allergies would be protected sitting at another table
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Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM
While I agree and find it annoying, put yourself if the other parents shoes. Can you imagine the scare of sending your kid to school everyday, worrying that some idiot would bring a peanut product and potentially kill your child?
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:10 PM

 


Quoting peanutsmommy1:

Ah yes, because a child who has airborn allergies would be protected sitting at another table


 Seriously..AIRBORN allergy to peanuts?  No, I'm seriously asking here.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:10 PM
3 moms liked this

Hey my child has a severe allergy to peanuts, I refuse to let my son die b/c you refuse to understand how serious this it.

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:10 PM
4 moms liked this

Home school and you can feed your kid whatever you want.

mem82
by Platinum Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:10 PM

TROLL

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM

My children were vegetarians and their choices were limited for a good, kid-friendly sandwich.  I was never told my kids couldn't bring PB&J because that is one of the very few things they could eat in a sandwich.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM

 Well, if your child has a peanut allergy, you make sure your child doesn't EAT peanuts...right?

So it's the preschool director's job to ensure, then, that that child isn't eating a peanut, right?

I mean, my kid gets a good source of protein from peanuts (organic, no added sugars).


Quoting Anonymous:

While I agree and find it annoying, put yourself if the other parents shoes. Can you imagine the scare of sending your kid to school everyday, worrying that some idiot would bring a peanut product and potentially kill your child?


 

Schleetle
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM
Well the kid can't help that they have an allergy. There are other kinds of sandwiches out there besides peanut/almond butter, and jelly.
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zomgkerrie
by Geek Goddess on Feb. 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM

yes, some people are so sensitive that just being in the same room can trigger a reaction.

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