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from SLATE:

Fighting anti-vaxxers is critical. The misinformation they spread is incredibly dangerous. First, because it’s simply wrong, almost to a letter. Second, because it spreads fear, and then parents don’t vaccinate their kids or get booster shots themselves. And when that happens, herd immunity drops, and when herd immunity drops, kids start getting infected. Some die. This is no joke: It happens in Australia, it happens in the United Kingdom, it happens here in the United States. Boulder, CO had a breakout last year and one baby came very close to death.

We need to get the word out: Vaccines save lives. And we also need to fight the forces of ignorance when we can.

by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:29 AM
Replies (381-390):
supercarp
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:36 PM

 The numbers do not support you. You probably have no idea what polio is. It's gone from the U.S.


Quoting Kitschy:

Everything you said can also be said for the opposing side. No vaccinating likely saved my son's life. 


 

MyGirlsAbbyLiz
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:38 PM
Because your kid was in the minority of children who had a problem they are automatically bad?


Quoting Anonymous:

funny, they ruined my son's life-PERMANENTLY!!!


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bnsellis
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:39 PM
Babies die from vaccinations too. (I do vaccinate but on my own terms. Just to clarify.)


Quoting supercarp:

 I am anti dead baby.




Quoting PurplePieguy:


Here we go again. 




 


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Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:41 PM
It's not gone. Why do you think our military still has to be vaccinated for it?


Quoting supercarp:

 Actually, there are some diseases that we have eradicated or nearly eradicated with vaccines. Smallpox used to kill many people. It's gone now.




Quoting redneckmama4:

Nope. Immune systems work, if they aren't compromised.

I found my old shot records from the 70's and I got around 6. Now kids get around 39 by 5yo. That is extreme to say the least!

We created the germ infested world we live in and our children are the product.

Our kids don't get shots and our oldest hasn't needed or been to the doc in almost 10 years. The youngest hasn't been in almost 4 years. She is 13 this month and he is 5 this year.



 


MyGirlsAbbyLiz
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:43 PM
I'll vaccinate my kids to keep them safe.if someone wants to put their childs life in danger by not vaccinating, whatever
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Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:07 PM
1 mom liked this

it is tragic that some babies have dies from what people ASSUME are vaccine related deaths.  that does not negate the fact that vaccines save countless lives a year - get your head out of the sand people. 

supercarp
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:10 PM

 Very true. Just because 2 things happen at the same time does not mean that one caused or is even related to the other.


Quoting Anonymous:

it is tragic that some babies have dies from what people ASSUME are vaccine related deaths.  that does not negate the fact that vaccines save countless lives a year - get your head out of the sand people. 


 

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:13 PM

 

This is a hunch - but I suspect the CDC figures are alittle out of date or worst-case scenario.  Take measles for example - they say there is one death per 500.  Where and when are they getting this stat from?  There is an average of 60 cases of measles per year in the USA (according to the CDC).  It would take 9 years to get even one death.  It is too small a population to be basing fatality rates on.  OTOH, there was a widespread recent mealsse outbreak in Europe - with enough data to really look at thing.  The mortality rate was about 1/2500.  I still think mealses is on the scary side - but it is not scary as 1/500.

There are virtually no cases of diptheria and tetanus in the USA. These are disease that would not increase in any significant way even if everybody stopped vaxxing.   It does not matter if they have a 10% death rate - as 10% of close to nothing is close to nothing.

 

I urge anybody who is new to vaccine research to look at the incident rate of diseases in the CDC Pink book - it is in the appendix.

Quoting Anonymous:

Measles
Pneumonia: 6 in 100
Encephalitis: 1 in 1,000
Death: 2 in 1,000

Rubella
Congenital Rubella Syndrome: 1 in 4 (if woman becomes infected early in pregnancy)

VACCINES

MMR
Encephalitis or severe allergic reaction: 
1 in 1,000,000

Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis vs. DTap Vaccine

DISEASE

Diphtheria
Death: 1 in 20

Tetanus
Death: 2 in 10

Pertussis
Pneumonia: 1 in 8
Encephalitis: 1 in 20
Death: 1 in 1,500

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:21 PM

 

Did we ever stop to think that diptheria and tetanus are not an issue because we vaccinate? I'm just saying. But common sense isn't so common.

Also, stating a statistic is a worst case scenerio doesn't make any logical sense. They get their numbers based on reported cases. So they take a FACT and create a statistic. They aren't guessing there were that many cases or making assumptions about it.

As far as being out of date, I could not say. The most recent update for the statistics was taken from the U.S. Department of Health in 2009. So yes, that is 3-4 years, but it's not like they got it from 1979.

Quoting Anonymous:

 

This is a hunch - but I suspect the CDC figures are alittle out of date or worst-case scenario.  Take measles for example - they say there is one death per 500.  Where and when are they getting this stat from?  There is an average of 60 cases of measles per year in the USA (according to the CDC).  it would take 9 years to get even one death.  it is too small a population to be basing fatality rates on.  OTOH, there was a widespread recent mealsse outbreak in Europe - with enough data to really look at thing.  The mortality rate was about 1/2500.  I still think mealses is on the scary side - but it is not scary as 1/500.

There are virtually no cases of diptheria and tetanus in the USA. These are disease that would not increase in any significant way even if everybody stopped vaxxing.   It does not matter if they have a 10% death rate - as 10% of close to nothing is close to nothing.

 

I urge anybody who is new to vaccine research to look at the incident rate of diseases in the CDC Pink book - it is in the appendix.

Quoting Anonymous:

Measles
Pneumonia: 6 in 100
Encephalitis: 1 in 1,000
Death: 2 in 1,000

Rubella
Congenital Rubella Syndrome: 1 in 4 (if woman becomes infected early in pregnancy)

VACCINES

MMR
Encephalitis or severe allergic reaction: 
1 in 1,000,000

Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis vs. DTap Vaccine

DISEASE

Diphtheria
Death: 1 in 20

Tetanus
Death: 2 in 10

Pertussis
Pneumonia: 1 in 8
Encephalitis: 1 in 20
Death: 1 in 1,500

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

tyrelsmom
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:39 PM
And this is why you can't believe the injury stats. Because this is the EXACT attitude when you show up in the ER with a child having a vaccine reaction. No matter how obvious the connection is. Most are never reported.


Quoting supercarp:

 Very true. Just because 2 things happen at the same time does not mean that one caused or is even related to the other.




Quoting Anonymous:


it is tragic that some babies have dies from what people ASSUME are vaccine related deaths.  that does not negate the fact that vaccines save countless lives a year - get your head out of the sand people. 




 


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