Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Undiagnosed autism?

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
My nephew is going to be 5 next month. He doesn't say a single word. He is still in diapers and he shows no emotion. He still chews on everything. Everyone in the family says he has autism...everyone except his parents. They say his pediatrician says its normal. They were supposed to see a specialist over a year ago and never went. My fear is they are just going to try and throw him in a normal kindergarten class and he is going to have such a hard time. He needed to be getting help two years ago and I feel its too late. It seems as if they don't want to accept that there is something wrong with their child.
Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 7, 2013 at 8:26 PM
Replies (11-20):
pampire
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:49 PM

No way their ped said that's normal.  They are in denial.  It's not too late, but they need to get on the ball and take him to a specialist.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM
Quoting sweetboys4me:




Thank you. It is pretty mild. I noticed when he was about 6 months old that he was still keeping his right fist closed like a newborn. He is going to need a brace for his leg and his hand, but he is making awesome progress. Today he was eating yogurt and out of nowhere put his right index finger right in the yogurt and ate it....I didn't even have to coach him. I know it doesn't sound like much, but its amazing progress for him. Around 18 months me and his therapist agreed he would benefit from speech therapy. He was only saying about 10 words and wasn't clapping, pointing or waving. Now he has at least 50 words and is doing all those hand movements. He turned two in December.
sweetboys4me
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:04 PM


Congrats Mama.  it is amazing what early intervention will do. 

Quoting Anonymous:

Quoting sweetboys4me:




Thank you. It is pretty mild. I noticed when he was about 6 months old that he was still keeping his right fist closed like a newborn. He is going to need a brace for his leg and his hand, but he is making awesome progress. Today he was eating yogurt and out of nowhere put his right index finger right in the yogurt and ate it....I didn't even have to coach him. I know it doesn't sound like much, but its amazing progress for him. Around 18 months me and his therapist agreed he would benefit from speech therapy. He was only saying about 10 words and wasn't clapping, pointing or waving. Now he has at least 50 words and is doing all those hand movements. He turned two in December.



brandydesiree
by Platinum Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:05 PM
That's great I wish all schools did that. Separated the classes. That way the kids who excel can learn more efficiently as the kids who need more help could be in a class who works slower.


Quoting sweetboys4me:

My oldest is in kindergarten this year. When we registered him they did basic testing for letter and number recognition, top of page bottom of pages in a book. Just basics so they could place him in the appropriate class. Hes normal functioning tho. My youngest has delays and not officially asd labeled yet. Hes 3 and in special needs preschool. If her nephew is that low functioning, they would never just put him in a regular classroom (I would think)

Quoting brandydesiree:



Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:11 PM
1 mom liked this

My kids school is like this.  They go by levels for math, reading and homeroom (science and social studies) My daughter is in lever 4 (advanced) and my son is level 3 reading, he started out level 2 and they moved him up to level 3, and he is in level 4 math.  I love that they do this, no one is held back and no one is being pushed to do something they cannot do.  They also have no problem moving kids up and down.  They do not like to see a kid struggle or not be challenged.


Quoting brandydesiree:

That's great I wish all schools did that. Separated the classes. That way the kids who excel can learn more efficiently as the kids who need more help could be in a class who works slower.


Quoting sweetboys4me:

My oldest is in kindergarten this year. When we registered him they did basic testing for letter and number recognition, top of page bottom of pages in a book. Just basics so they could place him in the appropriate class. Hes normal functioning tho. My youngest has delays and not officially asd labeled yet. Hes 3 and in special needs preschool. If her nephew is that low functioning, they would never just put him in a regular classroom (I would think)

Quoting brandydesiree:





sweetboys4me
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:14 PM


No one over the internet can diagnose a child.  How old is he though? 

There are various programs (federally funded) to evaluate and serve children with disabilities up to the age of three.  He will need to be refered for evaluation by a doctor.  The process is simple.  Fill out questionaires and go in for evauation/observation to see if he qualifies for services.  I'm in GA so cannot speak for everywhere else.  All therapies were done in my house.  No transporting anywhere after he was deemed eligible.

If he is over the age of three (don't quote me on this but I am pretty sure he does not need a referal), have his parents call the school district he is in and have him evaluated for special needs placement.  The parents will have to fill out a questionaire and take him in for an evaluation/observation as well. 

Whatever you do, do not panic!!!  Many children have delays and are not autistic! 

Quoting Anonymous:

Does that mean my nephew might be autistic? He still acts like a baby and doesn't talk yet
I think him and my 1 year old act the same and babble the same way.



sweetboys4me
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:21 PM


I guess I just assumed that every school tested the same as ours.  We also live in a diverse area.  We have many non native speakers and/or low income families in our school.  maybe that's why they test them as they do.  There are 5 Kindergartens at my son's school and only 2 are completely on level.  The other 3 are much smaller in size and work at getting the kids up to the first grade level.  Every flier sent home is printed English on one side and Spanish on the other.

Quoting brandydesiree:

That's great I wish all schools did that. Separated the classes. That way the kids who excel can learn more efficiently as the kids who need more help could be in a class who works slower.


Quoting sweetboys4me:

My oldest is in kindergarten this year. When we registered him they did basic testing for letter and number recognition, top of page bottom of pages in a book. Just basics so they could place him in the appropriate class. Hes normal functioning tho. My youngest has delays and not officially asd labeled yet. Hes 3 and in special needs preschool. If her nephew is that low functioning, they would never just put him in a regular classroom (I would think)

Quoting brandydesiree:





Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:32 PM
Quoting sweetboys4me:




This is true for my state. If they are already in early intervention, their caseworker will contact the school before their 3rd birthday and set everything up so the day they turn 3 they can start preschool. EI can see them up til the day before their 3rd birthday.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:33 PM
He is 4 almost 5. His parents think it's normal but my niece was speaking, reading, and knew math and numbers by that age while my nephew acts like my 1 year old.


Quoting sweetboys4me:


No one over the internet can diagnose a child.  How old is he though? 

There are various programs (federally funded) to evaluate and serve children with disabilities up to the age of three.  He will need to be refered for evaluation by a doctor.  The process is simple.  Fill out questionaires and go in for evauation/observation to see if he qualifies for services.  I'm in GA so cannot speak for everywhere else.  All therapies were done in my house.  No transporting anywhere after he was deemed eligible.

If he is over the age of three (don't quote me on this but I am pretty sure he does not need a referal), have his parents call the school district he is in and have him evaluated for special needs placement.  The parents will have to fill out a questionaire and take him in for an evaluation/observation as well. 

Whatever you do, do not panic!!!  Many children have delays and are not autistic! 


Quoting Anonymous:

Does that mean my nephew might be autistic? He still acts like a baby and doesn't talk yet

I think him and my 1 year old act the same and babble the same way.





sweetboys4me
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:41 PM


Have his parents call the school districts special education dept in the morning and see what they suggest.  It may take some time to get him observed, go over the results, write an IEP, and get him started.  My son was evaluated the tuesday after Labor Day.  Took about 4-5 wks for the specialists and psychologists to analyze the info and write a report.  We had his IEP on October 18th where we set specific goals for him to meet during the school year (included various therapists and specified therapies).  Took about a week for transportation to work him into their system.  His first day of school was Oct 30th.  With that said, we knew he was needing services and it still took 2 months to get him in the system. For the sake of your nephew, beg his parents to call and get the ball rolling asap!!!  I'll keep him in my thoughts.  Best wishes

Quoting Anonymous:

He is 4 almost 5. His parents think it's normal but my niece was speaking, reading, and knew math and numbers by that age while my nephew acts like my 1 year old.


Quoting sweetboys4me:


No one over the internet can diagnose a child.  How old is he though? 

There are various programs (federally funded) to evaluate and serve children with disabilities up to the age of three.  He will need to be refered for evaluation by a doctor.  The process is simple.  Fill out questionaires and go in for evauation/observation to see if he qualifies for services.  I'm in GA so cannot speak for everywhere else.  All therapies were done in my house.  No transporting anywhere after he was deemed eligible.

If he is over the age of three (don't quote me on this but I am pretty sure he does not need a referal), have his parents call the school district he is in and have him evaluated for special needs placement.  The parents will have to fill out a questionaire and take him in for an evaluation/observation as well. 

Whatever you do, do not panic!!!  Many children have delays and are not autistic! 


Quoting Anonymous:

Does that mean my nephew might be autistic? He still acts like a baby and doesn't talk yet

I think him and my 1 year old act the same and babble the same way.







Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)