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Potty training any ideas?

Posted by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:35 PM
  • 21 Replies

My 2 1/2 year old is giving me the worst time with potty training... I have been working with her for several weeks now and nothing is working. She tells me mom change me and that is a sure sign she is ready but I can not get her to go on the potty.. I take her to the potty about every 20 mins.. It worked well with my other 2 they had no problems at all.. I do not want to stress her out or punish her for not doing it I do feel that is not right.. But man this kid is stubborn LOL do any of you have any ideas?? What worked with your kids?? I have done the candy and sticker thing the new panties.. I even get her a potty time Dora thinking that may work.. nothing...

by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:35 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Stephd710
by Ruby Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:37 PM

Im having the same problem.  Ive got 2 year old twin girls.  They will NOT go on the potty.  They sit down for 2 seconds and hop back up.  Ive let them watch me go several times and they just laugh and run away. LOL!  Im SO ready to be done with stupid diapers!!!

hunnybunny2001
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:39 PM

Yes same here.. She is my last one.. I am so looking forward to never buying diapers again.. i have taken her in with me also.. My 12 yr old has even been trying to work with her.. because she wants to.. she does not have to.. nothing..lol 

Quoting Stephd710:

Im having the same problem.  Ive got 2 year old twin girls.  They will NOT go on the potty.  They sit down for 2 seconds and hop back up.  Ive let them watch me go several times and they just laugh and run away. LOL!  Im SO ready to be done with stupid diapers!!!


Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:45 PM
1 mom liked this

Potty training readiness checklist (age 2)

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
Last updated: November 2011

Is your 2-year-old ready for potty training? There's no magic age at which children are ready to start learning how to use the potty, but some develop the necessary physical and cognitive skills between 18 and 24 months of age.

Many parents don't start potty training until their children are 2 1/2 to 3 years old, when daytime bladder control has become more reliable. And some children aren't interested in potty training until they're closer to 3, or even 4.

Use the checklist below to measure your 2-year-old's progress toward readiness, and keep in mind that starting before your child is truly ready doesn't mean you'll finish sooner — it's more likely that the process will just end up taking longer.

You don't have to wait until you've checked off every item to start training. Just look for a general trend toward independence and an understanding of what it means to go to the bathroom like a grown-up.

Physical signs

  • Can walk and run steadily.
  • Urinates a fair amount at one time.
  • Has regular, well-formed bowel movements at relatively predictable times.
  • Has "dry" periods of at least two hours or more, which shows that her bladder muscles are developed enough to hold urine.

Behavioral signs

  • Can sit down quietly in one position for two to five minutes.
  • Can pull her pants up and down. Dislikes the feeling of wearing a wet or dirty diaper.
  • Shows interest in others' bathroom habits (wants to watch you go to the bathroom or wear underwear).
  • Gives a physical or verbal sign when she's having a bowel movement such as grunting, squatting, or telling you.
  • Demonstrates a desire for independence.
  • Takes pride in her accomplishments.
  • Isn't resistant to learning to use the toilet.
  • Is in a generally cooperative stage, not a negative or contrary one.

Cognitive signs

  • Can follow simple instructions, such as "sit on your potty chair."
  • Understands the value of putting things where they belong.
  • Has words for urine and stool.
  • Understands the physical signals that mean she has to go and can tell you before it happens or even hold it until she has time to get to the potty.


How to Potty Train a Child by tetheredcat
nomorediapers.jpg
I have successfully potty-trained six of my children, as well as three of my siblings, while they were between the ages of 22 and 28 months, in the course of a week. In the next few minutes, I will share my secret method, and hopefully, you too can say good-bye to diaper doody, err, duty, once and for all!

Step 1: Readiness

Around the age of 22-24 months, a toddler will exhibit signs of readiness. Conscious pause in play to poop, whining to be changed when wet or poopy are some of these signs. Also, having the verbal ability to communicate the act (a simple "pee-pee and poo-poo will suffice) is important. Make an effort to determine how long the toddler stays dry on any given day. This means checking every hour for wetness. When the toddler can "hold it" for at least an hour, preferably two, he or she is ready for the next phase.

Step 2: Doo As I Doo

simple potty.jpg
It may sound strange, but kids learn from example! About a week or two before starting the final phase, make a scene when you go potty. Don't worry, the child will not know you look foolish. Standing outside the bathroom door, grab the front of your pants and put an apprehensive look on your face, and say something along the lines of "oh, no! pee-pee!" and dash into the bathroom. I guarantee the toddler will follow out of sheer curiosity and to see what the heck your problem is. If you aren't comfortable doing the deed in front of the child, pretend. Perform that act once or twice a day. Within a week or two, you are ready to proceed. 
Hint: If there are older, potty-trained children around, the toddler will almost likely want to know what on earth is going on in the bathroom, and often will pick up clues by watching them instead. 
Pick up a potty chair with the child. A simple potty chair is best. No fancy gadgets with bells, lights and sound effects. No toilet paper holder. No book rack. Just. A. Potty. Chair.

Step 3: Seven Step Program, Part One

Gerber-Pants-Boys-d.jpg
As in, seven days. Pick one week where you can give the child your completely undivided attention! In the days before the week commences, take the child shopping, and pick out "big boy" or "big girl" underwear. These should be the 100% cloth training pants that are basically underwear, with an extra thick padding in the middle. Not pull-ups, not plastic-lining-on-the-outside underwear. If the kid feels like he or she is wearing a diaper, guess what? They will treat it like a diaper. 
At bedtime the night before the week-long training begins, remind the child that tomorrow he or she will be a big kid and will wear undies! YAY!

Step 4: The Hard Part

When the child wakes in the morning, make a big deal about how they are such a big kid! Remove the diaper, clean as usual, and then put the new training pants on the child. And that is all the child should have from the waist down! This gives the kids a chance to feel when they have wet or pooped. (I have done this method in EVERY season, they never freeze to death, I promise) 
Throughout the day, offer the child dry snacks (to increase thirst just a little) and follow up with plenty of drinks, milk, juices, water, whatever the child will drink. This helps the child actually feel the bladder fill, and eventually correlate the act of drinking and peeing. Every hour, take the child to the potty chair, help them pull the underwear down, and help them sit. Encourage them to pee, using extremely simple language. "Time for pee-pee"! etc, using facial expressions of effort (yes, the grunt face). Wait a few minutes. It won't happen immediately, and most likely, it won't happen at all in the potty the first two days. After about five minutes, consider it a good effort no matter what happens. Offer praise (good try!). 
The first two days, the child will wet themselves every single time. It's just how it is. 
You aren't doing anything wrong. It has to "click" for the kid. You will be very frustrated, but persevere. Backtracking to diapers during the day is confusing. When an accident happens, feel free to look disappointed. Phrases I have used: "aw man! an accident!" and even "ew, stinky poo!" It's not making a child "feel ashamed of bodily functions". It's making the child aware that big people don't walk around pooping and peeing on ourselves and sitting in it. 
At nap time, place a folded old towel under the child, or have some other absorbent but unobtrusive padding under the lower half of the toddler.As soon as he or she wakes, excitedly take them to the potty if they are dry. If they are wet, it's ok to be disappointed and say "aw, you had an accident!" in a sad voice. They can "help" clean up, and when all is right again, say "good job!" and give great big hugs. 
At night, continue the bedtime routine, but insert a potty chair trip just before the last bedtime diaper is put on. 

Step 5: Figuring It Out

The third and fourth days, continue the same steps as the first days, offering snacks, and fluids, but you will notice that the child will pee about 50% of the time in the potty and most likely will have a poop on the potty. Continue to watch clues! When you see the child grunting or pausing in play, especially if he or she is fairly regular like most kids are, say "poo-poo?!?!" and hold their hand, and dash to the potty. Even if they don't make it, they form the opinion that this poo-making business is serious, and therefore must be paid attention to. When they have a poo-accident, make sure they watch you dump the poop into the toilet, have them wave bye-bye to it, and holding their hand for reassurance, flush it. Some kids get nervous with the flush. But most kids have seen/heard it plenty by now, just from following you into the bathroom oh so many times. 

Step 6: Fine Tuning

bwpotty.jpg
The fifth, sixth and seventh days are the fine tuning days. The child now gets the concept, and is working to perfect this new skill. You can now return to the regularly scheduled snacks and drinks. Do continue to ask the child every hour if the potty is needed, just as a reminder, especially when the child is concentrating hard at building a tower or some other fun task. 
On the seventh day, take the brave step of a trip outside the house. Pack a change of bottoms. Pee before you leave, if possible. Ask every hour if the potty is needed. And don't take more than an hour and a half before going back home. This is almost like a test. The child sees that "Wow! People leave the house like this?!" 
As for giving up the night-time diaper, wait until the child goes for at least 2 weeks without a single night-time accident before you let them sleep in their undies. 
Don't forget to do the happy dance when there is success in the potty, no matter how minute. The child will make a grand effort just to see you do that again. 
Good luck, and happy trails...


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:46 PM

 

Same here! My twins are giving me a run for my money

Quoting Stephd710:

Im having the same problem.  Ive got 2 year old twin girls.  They will NOT go on the potty.  They sit down for 2 seconds and hop back up.  Ive let them watch me go several times and they just laugh and run away. LOL!  Im SO ready to be done with stupid diapers!!!


 

ms.sophsmom
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:47 PM
I just got right into. I did pull ups for awhile bt then i decided to just gt her right into undies and do it! Had quite alot of accidents... Still have a few every now and then. But dd is 3 1/2 now and doing great. (i did this last year)
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hunnybunny2001
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:50 PM

Thank you for posting this... She meets all the signs..I am going to try all of this thank you again

Quoting Sassy762:

Potty training readiness checklist (age 2)

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
Last updated: November 2011

Is your 2-year-old ready for potty training? There's no magic age at which children are ready to start learning how to use the potty, but some develop the necessary physical and cognitive skills between 18 and 24 months of age.

Many parents don't start potty training until their children are 2 1/2 to 3 years old, when daytime bladder control has become more reliable. And some children aren't interested in potty training until they're closer to 3, or even 4.

Use the checklist below to measure your 2-year-old's progress toward readiness, and keep in mind that starting before your child is truly ready doesn't mean you'll finish sooner — it's more likely that the process will just end up taking longer.

You don't have to wait until you've checked off every item to start training. Just look for a general trend toward independence and an understanding of what it means to go to the bathroom like a grown-up.

Physical signs

  • Can walk and run steadily.
  • Urinates a fair amount at one time.
  • Has regular, well-formed bowel movements at relatively predictable times.
  • Has "dry" periods of at least two hours or more, which shows that her bladder muscles are developed enough to hold urine.

Behavioral signs

  • Can sit down quietly in one position for two to five minutes.
  • Can pull her pants up and down. Dislikes the feeling of wearing a wet or dirty diaper.
  • Shows interest in others' bathroom habits (wants to watch you go to the bathroom or wear underwear).
  • Gives a physical or verbal sign when she's having a bowel movement such as grunting, squatting, or telling you.
  • Demonstrates a desire for independence.
  • Takes pride in her accomplishments.
  • Isn't resistant to learning to use the toilet.
  • Is in a generally cooperative stage, not a negative or contrary one.

Cognitive signs

  • Can follow simple instructions, such as "sit on your potty chair."
  • Understands the value of putting things where they belong.
  • Has words for urine and stool.
  • Understands the physical signals that mean she has to go and can tell you before it happens or even hold it until she has time to get to the potty.



How to Potty Train a Child by tetheredcat
nomorediapers.jpg
I have successfully potty-trained six of my children, as well as three of my siblings, while they were between the ages of 22 and 28 months, in the course of a week. In the next few minutes, I will share my secret method, and hopefully, you too can say good-bye to diaper doody, err, duty, once and for all!

Step 1: Readiness

Around the age of 22-24 months, a toddler will exhibit signs of readiness. Conscious pause in play to poop, whining to be changed when wet or poopy are some of these signs. Also, having the verbal ability to communicate the act (a simple "pee-pee and poo-poo will suffice) is important. Make an effort to determine how long the toddler stays dry on any given day. This means checking every hour for wetness. When the toddler can "hold it" for at least an hour, preferably two, he or she is ready for the next phase.

Step 2: Doo As I Doo

simple potty.jpg
It may sound strange, but kids learn from example! About a week or two before starting the final phase, make a scene when you go potty. Don't worry, the child will not know you look foolish. Standing outside the bathroom door, grab the front of your pants and put an apprehensive look on your face, and say something along the lines of "oh, no! pee-pee!" and dash into the bathroom. I guarantee the toddler will follow out of sheer curiosity and to see what the heck your problem is. If you aren't comfortable doing the deed in front of the child, pretend. Perform that act once or twice a day. Within a week or two, you are ready to proceed. 
Hint: If there are older, potty-trained children around, the toddler will almost likely want to know what on earth is going on in the bathroom, and often will pick up clues by watching them instead. 
Pick up a potty chair with the child. A simple potty chair is best. No fancy gadgets with bells, lights and sound effects. No toilet paper holder. No book rack. Just. A. Potty. Chair.

Step 3: Seven Step Program, Part One

Gerber-Pants-Boys-d.jpg
As in, seven days. Pick one week where you can give the child your completely undivided attention! In the days before the week commences, take the child shopping, and pick out "big boy" or "big girl" underwear. These should be the 100% cloth training pants that are basically underwear, with an extra thick padding in the middle. Not pull-ups, not plastic-lining-on-the-outside underwear. If the kid feels like he or she is wearing a diaper, guess what? They will treat it like a diaper. 
At bedtime the night before the week-long training begins, remind the child that tomorrow he or she will be a big kid and will wear undies! YAY!

Step 4: The Hard Part

When the child wakes in the morning, make a big deal about how they are such a big kid! Remove the diaper, clean as usual, and then put the new training pants on the child. And that is all the child should have from the waist down! This gives the kids a chance to feel when they have wet or pooped. (I have done this method in EVERY season, they never freeze to death, I promise) 
Throughout the day, offer the child dry snacks (to increase thirst just a little) and follow up with plenty of drinks, milk, juices, water, whatever the child will drink. This helps the child actually feel the bladder fill, and eventually correlate the act of drinking and peeing. Every hour, take the child to the potty chair, help them pull the underwear down, and help them sit. Encourage them to pee, using extremely simple language. "Time for pee-pee"! etc, using facial expressions of effort (yes, the grunt face). Wait a few minutes. It won't happen immediately, and most likely, it won't happen at all in the potty the first two days. After about five minutes, consider it a good effort no matter what happens. Offer praise (good try!). 
The first two days, the child will wet themselves every single time. It's just how it is. 
You aren't doing anything wrong. It has to "click" for the kid. You will be very frustrated, but persevere. Backtracking to diapers during the day is confusing. When an accident happens, feel free to look disappointed. Phrases I have used: "aw man! an accident!" and even "ew, stinky poo!" It's not making a child "feel ashamed of bodily functions". It's making the child aware that big people don't walk around pooping and peeing on ourselves and sitting in it. 
At nap time, place a folded old towel under the child, or have some other absorbent but unobtrusive padding under the lower half of the toddler.As soon as he or she wakes, excitedly take them to the potty if they are dry. If they are wet, it's ok to be disappointed and say "aw, you had an accident!" in a sad voice. They can "help" clean up, and when all is right again, say "good job!" and give great big hugs. 
At night, continue the bedtime routine, but insert a potty chair trip just before the last bedtime diaper is put on. 

Step 5: Figuring It Out

The third and fourth days, continue the same steps as the first days, offering snacks, and fluids, but you will notice that the child will pee about 50% of the time in the potty and most likely will have a poop on the potty. Continue to watch clues! When you see the child grunting or pausing in play, especially if he or she is fairly regular like most kids are, say "poo-poo?!?!" and hold their hand, and dash to the potty. Even if they don't make it, they form the opinion that this poo-making business is serious, and therefore must be paid attention to. When they have a poo-accident, make sure they watch you dump the poop into the toilet, have them wave bye-bye to it, and holding their hand for reassurance, flush it. Some kids get nervous with the flush. But most kids have seen/heard it plenty by now, just from following you into the bathroom oh so many times. 

Step 6: Fine Tuning

bwpotty.jpg
The fifth, sixth and seventh days are the fine tuning days. The child now gets the concept, and is working to perfect this new skill. You can now return to the regularly scheduled snacks and drinks. Do continue to ask the child every hour if the potty is needed, just as a reminder, especially when the child is concentrating hard at building a tower or some other fun task. 
On the seventh day, take the brave step of a trip outside the house. Pack a change of bottoms. Pee before you leave, if possible. Ask every hour if the potty is needed. And don't take more than an hour and a half before going back home. This is almost like a test. The child sees that "Wow! People leave the house like this?!" 
As for giving up the night-time diaper, wait until the child goes for at least 2 weeks without a single night-time accident before you let them sleep in their undies. 
Don't forget to do the happy dance when there is success in the potty, no matter how minute. The child will make a grand effort just to see you do that again. 
Good luck, and happy trails...



Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:51 PM
My son is 3 years 4 months and has zero interest. He also does not care if he is wet or dirty. But he can read(simple books like dr suess) and do simple math, which to me is more important. Im sure he will be ready eventually.
Stephd710
by Ruby Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:53 PM
1 mom liked this

Im so frustrated.  I work full time 5 days a week too so I think its going to be super hard to get a routine going with them.  My sitter said she will help, but im still worried about them understanding. 


Quoting Anonymous:


Same here! My twins are giving me a run for my money

Quoting Stephd710:

Im having the same problem.  Ive got 2 year old twin girls.  They will NOT go on the potty.  They sit down for 2 seconds and hop back up.  Ive let them watch me go several times and they just laugh and run away. LOL!  Im SO ready to be done with stupid diapers!!!





Toxic.Stardust
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:54 PM

maybe she's just not ready? My DD wasn't potty trained until right before she turned 3. 3 is the average age

hunnybunny2001
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:56 PM
Yes I was thinking that also. That's what my husband says too

Quoting Toxic.Stardust:

maybe she's just not ready? My DD wasn't potty trained until right before she turned 3. 3 is the average age

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